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by Edward C. Lorenz
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Edward C. Lorenz
  • ISBN:
    0268025517
  • ISBN13:
    978-0268025519
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Notre Dame Press; First Edition edition (October 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    328 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1735 kb
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    1594 kb
  • DJVU format
    1120 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
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    458
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by. Lorenz, Edward C. Publication date.

by.

Defining Global Justice offers the first comprehensive overview of the history of the United States' role in the International Labor Organization (ILO)

Defining Global Justice offers the first comprehensive overview of the history of the United States' role in the International Labor Organization (ILO). In this thought-provoking book, Edward Lorenz addresses the challenge laid down by the President of the American Political Science Association in 2000, who urged scholars to discover "how well-structured institutions could enable the world to have 'a new birth of freedom'. Lorenz's study describes one model of a well-structured institution.

Despite its title, the book nowhere defines "justice," but Lorenz implicitly identifies it with enforceable international labor standards rather than mere declarations of labor rights

Despite its title, the book nowhere defines "justice," but Lorenz implicitly identifies it with enforceable international labor standards rather than mere declarations of labor rights. In his view, these standards should include, inter alia, free labor unions, the abolition of child labor, and a meaningful minimum wage. More: Economics Global Institutions. Defining Global Justice: The History of . International Labor Standards Policy.

Defining Global Justice is by a social historian who chronicles in a. But its author, Edward C. Lorenz, who teaches history at a relatively small Michigan college, seems.

history of economic thought has been tied up with profound differences about. optimal policies regarding trade among nations. blissfully unaware of the rigid -start-school conventions. found in most college’s economics departments’ curricula.

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Here Edward Lorenz offers us a history of US political debates over the International Labor Organization (ILO), founded precisely to stop that spiral.

Knowledge, Learning and Routines (Critical Studies in Economic Institutions, 4). Nathalie Lazaric, Edward Lorenz. 8 RUR. Internatinal Labor Standards Policy. Edward Norton Lorenz.

Defining Global Justice by Edward C. Lorenz, October 2001, University . September 15, 2018 History.

September 15, 2018 History. Defining Global Justice. Published October 2001 by University of Notre Dame Press.

Defining Global Justice: The History of . Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame University Press, 2001.

This text covers the history of the USA's role in the International Labor Organization (ILO). It covers the challenge by the President of the American Political Science Association in 2000, who urged scholars to discover how "well-structured institutions could enable the world to have a new birth of freedom". Lorenz's study describes one model of a well-structured institution. His history of the US interaction with the ILO shows how some popular organizations, including organized labour, the women's movement, academics, the legal community, and religious institutions have been able to utilize the ILO structure to counter what the APSA president called "self-serving elites and...their worst impulses". These organizations succeeded repeatedly in introducing popular visions of social justice into global economic planning and the world economy. The text reveals why the USA, despite showing exceptional restraint in domestic social policy making, played a leading role in the pursuit of just international labour standards.