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Download A Long Time Coming UK PB edition: The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and the Historic Election of Barack Obama fb2

by Staff of Newsweek,Evan Thomas
Download A Long Time Coming UK PB edition: The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and the Historic Election of Barack Obama fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Staff of Newsweek,Evan Thomas
  • ISBN:
    1586487612
  • ISBN13:
    978-1586487614
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    PublicAffairs; International edition (February 3, 2009)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1133 kb
  • ePUB format
    1246 kb
  • DJVU format
    1315 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    853
  • Formats:
    txt lrf lit doc


The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and the Historic Election of Barack Obama.

The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and the Historic Election of Barack Obama. Alan Brinkley is provost and Allan Nevins professor of history at Columbia University.

Since 1984, Newsweek has been renowned for its vivid, in-depth special election coverage of the ordeal of running for the presidency. A year before the election, Newsweek assigns reporters to get inside the campaigns of the Republican and Democratic candidates. They travel with the candidates, are there at crucial turning points and confidential meetings, and uncover stories not covered in day-to-day reporting.

Verdict: Dispatches from five Newsweek reporters are skillfully blended into this readable narrative of the 2008 election

Verdict: Dispatches from five Newsweek reporters are skillfully blended into this readable narrative of the 2008 election Читать весь отзыв.

Thomas offers a behind-the-scenes recount of the 2008 presidential campaign

This ebook consists of a summary of the ideas, viewpoints and facts presented by Evan Thomas and the Staff of Newsweek in his book A Long Time Coming: The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and the Historic Election of Barack Obama. This summary offers a concise overview of the entire book in less than 30 minutes reading time. However this work does not replace in any case Evan Thomas’ and the Staff of Newsweek’s book. Thomas offers a behind-the-scenes recount of the 2008 presidential campaign. He explains the rise of Obama and gives inside stories about the other presidential candidates

Publisher : Perseus Books Group. Since 1984, Newsweek has been renowned for its vivid, in-depth special election coverage of the ordeal of running for the presidency.

Publisher : Perseus Books Group.

A Long Time Coming, The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and the Historic Election of Barack Obama. A Long Time Coming, The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and the Historic Election of Barack Obama.

A Long Time Coming book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Long Time Coming: The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and the Historic Election of Barack Obama as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Evan Thomas and Newsweek

Evan Thomas and Newsweek. Published by PublicAffairs,U.

A Long Time Coming - Evan Thomas. And yes, one can find all the original articles still online, but who wants to go through all that trouble of finding, downloading, and printing. That is not to say that the book is completely devoid of good insight.

This title provides a revelatory account of the 2008 presidential election with the premier political reporters from "Newsweek". Since 1984, "Newsweek" has been renowned for its vivid, in-depth special election coverage of the ordeal of running for the presidency. A year before the election, "Newsweek" assigns reporters to get inside the campaigns of the Republican and Democratic candidates. "Newsweek" promises not to publish any information until after the votes are cast, and in exchange, the reporters receive remarkable access. They travel with the candidates, are there at crucial turning points and confidential meetings, and uncover stories not covered in day-to-day reporting. In this book, with a compelling narrative by Evan Thomas, "Newsweek" shares the inside stories from one of the most exciting elections in recent history, illuminating the personalities and events that influenced the outcome, and taking stock of the key players and key issues for the new administration. This will be an absorbing read for anyone interested in American politics.

Faulkree
The book was enjoyable for me as I love all things politics. However, there was nothing new in terms of what was going on behind the scenes while events were taking place during the 2008 presidential campaign. It was definitely an easy reading book for politico-files who can't get enough of the 2008 campaign and just want to go back into time.

I just wished there were more behind the scene stories of all the candidates in the campaign, but alas there were none. I am only sorry I didn't borrow the book from the library so I can give it back and save the money. I was disappointed!! But I did enjoy the writing style that is when I read Newsweek!!
Nekora
I really enjoyed this book, a great recap of the election. I saw on some other reviews that is just a reprint of the articles in the Newsweek magazine. Maybe it was, but I live a small town and am not always able to get Newsweek and Time magazines. The local stores do not carry them, or if they do, only a few copies, because they never seem to have them. The independent book store I go to, only gets a few, and they are always sold out. I did read one article on line, but when I found out the author was going to put the articles in a book, I just waited. So for me, this was great. A great read, and really, really interesting.
Sironynyr
Obviously a lot goes on during an election that shouldn't meet the eye before election day - Newsweek had reporters inside observing everything but embargoed until after the returns were counted - it makes for a great read even tho you know how it came out - and makes you even happier about the result
Sharpmane
As a political junkie, I always look forward to the Newsweek Election Book. Newsweek has always called this reporting "The Project;" it's a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the presidential campaign, and it never fails to deliver.

After this historic election, one of the most intriguing ever, I just could not WAIT for the Newsweek book to come out! I was thrilled when, the day after the election, Newsweek.com published on their webpage what I thought was a very, very huge "excerpt" of the forthcoming book, always released in early January following an election. The November 17th, 2008 issue print edition of Newsweek was almost entirely composed of this "The Project" and I was happy to have the issue so I could preserve the original "excerpt."

So, imagine my surprise when I purchased "A Long Time Coming" for $[...] and settled into what I hoped would be a long evening of reading the book and filling in all the details that were left out of the magazine and online versions. With just a simple glance through the book, I realized ever chapter was titled the same as the November article, and was presented in the same sequential order as in the book. So, starting to feel pretty disappointed, I pulled out my Nov. 17th Newsweek and got to comparing the two.

Down to the punctuation, this book is merely a reprint. Word for word! The book includes a pretty lame "Epilogue" as well as a rather uninteresting interview with President-Elect Obama at the end, but other than these additions, the book is just a complete copy of the original article! Including the photographs!!

Of course I'm returning the book. Why pay $[...] when I have the original Newsweek issue for $[...]? Heck you can read the entire book for free online at Newsweek.com, still!

I find it incredibly dishonest of Newsweek to not alert purchasers of this book that it is just a reprint of the original piece.

One final nitpick... you'd think that by printing the book, they would have corrected some of the major factual errors that appeared in the original piece. For example, in the original version the writers wrote that Hillary Clinton's sniper fire exaggeration occurred in April, when it occurred in March. This error was not corrected in the hardback edition of the book I purchased.

So, gentle readers, please avoid this book and try to just find a backissue of that Newsweek. Or go online. But don't waste your money on this disappointing book.
Vivaral
Barack Obama's historic election in 2008 may mark the resurgence of a dormant liberalism philosophy that has been dormant since the breakdown of Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty. If this turns out to be true, the 2008 campaign will be studied, analyzed and written about for many years from now. "A Long Time Coming" is probably the first in a long and interminable line of books about the election. It is often said that journalism is the first draft of history and as such, this book provides the closest understanding we have of the inside players and the decisions that made the election of Obama possible. There is an old saying that "victory has a hundred fathers, but defeat is an orphan." As such, the conventional wisdom was that almost every strategic decision that McCain and his inner circle made tended to be disastrous. But, if one takes a closer look at the numbers, and especially the battleground states of Colorado, Virginia, Ohio and Florida, the switching of a few thousand votes may have made a huge and ultimately monumental difference in the outcome. If those votes had been switched around, the narrative may have been how John McCain pulled off an historic upset on the scale of Truman in 1948. However, it didn't happen that way, so every mistake that McCain made, from the picking of Sarah Palin to the short lived suspension of his campaign in September is magnified ten thousand times over. Whereas , everything that Obama did was brilliant from focusing on the caucus states early on to using the internet to woo new voters and most especially donors. In the appendix to this book, Mr. Obama, in an interview even says that there was a lot of on the job training going on in 2007, and but for his triumphal speech at the Jefferson-Jackson dinner in Iowa in late 2007, we may have just inaugurated the first Woman president, rather than the first African American one.
However, the point that Mr. Evans makes, and makes rather well, is that in politics, the simple things matter. Obama was probably the most effective candidate, in recent memory, at staying on message throughout his campaign, while McCain's campaign was reduced to a series of gimmicks that unfortunately stand at odds with the selfless patriot and hero that McCain was. This book was, for the most part, taken from the Newsweek cover story in the week after the election, and does not expand on it, except for a brief introduction by Newsweek editor Mr. Meachem and an interview with Mr. Obama conducted during the middle of the election. But in a year that saw the greatest economic meltdown since the Great Depression, the party that represented the status quo had a tough road, but certainly the infighting in Mr. McCain's campaign did not help, and may have made Obama's victory a sure thing. In fact, the author writes that McCain's inner circle knew it was over a month before the election. The real history of this election, is that if someone like a John Kerry had won the nomination, there is probably a very good chance that he could have won with the way the economy was going, but the fact of the matter is that we will never know. In the future, the ebbs and flows of the 2008 campaign will be memorialized in books, documentaries and probably movies, but read this book and prepare for the tumult ahead as the facts become more legend then anything grounded in reality.