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Download The Great Hedge of India (Quest for One of the Lost Wonders of the World) fb2

by Roy Moxham
Download The Great Hedge of India (Quest for One of the Lost Wonders of the World) fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Roy Moxham
  • ISBN:
    1841194670
  • ISBN13:
    978-1841194677
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Constable (August 1, 2017)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1320 kb
  • ePUB format
    1302 kb
  • DJVU format
    1896 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    561
  • Formats:
    rtf txt doc mbr


This is the quest for a lost wonder of the world, in the author's words his 'ridiculous obsession', arose from the chance discovery of some dusty memoirs that told of a mighty hedge spanning the Indian subcontinent in th. .

This is the quest for a lost wonder of the world, in the author's words his 'ridiculous obsession', arose from the chance discovery of some dusty memoirs that told of a mighty hedge spanning the Indian subcontinent in the nineteenth century. The hedge was set in place to allow the collection of the Salt Tax by British customs officers. Free 5-8 business-day shipping within the . Prices may vary for AK and H.

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This is the story of the author's ridiculous quest for a legendary hedge planted across the Indian .

This is the story of the author's ridiculous quest for a legendary hedge planted across the Indian sub-continent and manned and cared for by 12,000 men. The hedge stood for over 50 years and at its greatest extent, formed part of a barrier 2500 miles long. Although it is one of the largest man-made constructions in human-history, the hedge appears in no history books and remains forgotten in both Britain and India. This inspired Roy Moxham to travel to India and investigate whether it had existed, what its purpose had been and whether any part of it had remained.

This is the quest for a lost wonder of the world, in the author's words his 'ridiculous obsession', arose from the chance discovery of some dusty memoirs that told of a mighty hedge spanning the Indian subcontinent in the nineteenth century

This is the quest for a lost wonder of the world, in the author's words his 'ridiculous obsession', arose from the chance discovery of some dusty memoirs that told of a mighty hedge spanning the Indian subcontinent in the nineteenth century. The hedge was set in place to allow the collection of the Salt Tax by British customs officers, Inspired by the concept of this amazing living barrier, now forgotten, Roy Moxham set off to find out what has happened to it and whether any remnant existed today.

Although it is one of the largest man-made constructions in human-history, the hedge appears in no history books and remains forgotten in both Britain and India

Although it is one of the largest man-made constructions in human-history, the hedge appears in no history books and remains forgotten in both Britain and India.

The Great Hedge consisted of Indian plum and other thorny bushes planted either on raised banks or in ditches. That comes over so clearly at the beginning of the book that I wondered if the book was going to be readable. Despite its epic scale, trying to find evidence of it nearly 120 years later clearly represented a major challenge. Roy Moxham, an archivist by profession, acknowledges that it was a problem he became obsessed with. I'm glad he did, and particularly enjoyed the sub-plot in which he relates his setbacks, frustrations and great tenacity in his quest. Recommended if British Indian history is your thing.

That hedge-which for fifty years had been manned and cared for by 12,000 men and had run a length of 2,500 miles-becomes what Moxham calls his "ridiculous obsession.

Roy Moxham was born and brought up in Evesham in Worcestershire

Roy Moxham was born and brought up in Evesham in Worcestershire. He has been an art gallery owner, book and paper conservator, and been in charge of conservation at the University of London Library. He is also the author of the Brief History of Tea also published by Robinson. Country of Publication.

No wonder that the ginger-headed man with the silky voice and the freeand easy manners was now looked upon with deep interest upon the banksof the great South American river, though the feelings he inspired werenaturally mixed, since the gratitude of the natives was equaled by theresentment of those who desired to exploit them. One useful result ofhis former experiences was that he could talk fluently in the LingoaGeral, which is the peculiar talk, one-third Portuguese and two-thirdsIndian, which is current all over Brazil.

It tells the story of one of the least-known wonders . The Great Hedge is part history, part detective story, part travel book. Roy Moxham was born and brought up in Evesham in Worcestershire.

It tells the story of one of the least-known wonders of Queen Victoria's India - a customs barrier 2,300 miles long, most of it made of hedge. Above all, it's a great read.

This is the quest for a lost wonder of the world, in the author's words his 'ridiculous obsession', arose from the chance discovery of some dusty memoirs that told of a mighty hedge spanning the Indian subcontinent in the nineteenth century.

The hedge was set in place to allow the collection of the Salt Tax by British customs officers, Inspired by the concept of this amazing living barrier, now forgotten, Roy Moxham set off to find out what has happened to it and whether any remnant existed today. His travels in India, and what he found there, form the basis for this illuminating book.

Writer Jan Morris comments, 'At first I thought this remarkable book must be a hoax . . . It tells the story of one of the least-known wonders of Queen Victoria's India - a customs barrier 2,300 miles long, most of it made of hedge. It was patrolled by 12,000 men and would have stretched from London to Constantinople, yet few historians mention it and most of us have never heard of it. Could anything be more astonishing?'


Hi_Jacker
A very interesting and entertaining book, which is part travelogue and part history lesson. His search for remnants of the "customs hedge" is compelling, and (spoiler alert), it's satisfying when he finds it. The only reason I gave this book 4 stars instead of 5 is that there aren't any photographs of the places he searched, the people he met, or, most importantly, the section of the hedge he found!
Nalaylewe
Amazingly, something as vast as this hedge, built under British supervision a century and a half ago, had disappeared from the 'history' of that time and place. Even more amazing, the author hit on this story totally by accident.

We travel with him as he searches for remnants of this massive but forgotten relic of the Raj. Moxham, with the help of both friends and strangers, travels with limited budget to rural areas of India during his holidays for several years.

Written in an informal style, I got a real sense of the area and the fun of the chase. For an 'off the beaten path' foray into the history of India in the 19th century, grab a copy of this and go exploring for several hours.

There is a short glossary, chart of weights and measurements and bibliography in the back and a general area map in the front.
Mr_Mole
Moxham has uncovered a part of the history of the British in India that has almost disappeared from general textbooks. The hedge was a monumental accomplishment. Or almost accomplishment, as it was an element of incredible suffering imposed on the people of India in the interests of making money. This story will help people understand why Gandhi's march to the ocean to make salt had such significance.
Ghordana
It's a great read, full of history and much research done by the author. It's a gift for an adventurous friend.