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by Bernard von Bothmer
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Bernard von Bothmer
  • ISBN:
    1558497323
  • ISBN13:
    978-1558497320
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Massachusetts Press (January 5, 2010)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1518 kb
  • ePUB format
    1511 kb
  • DJVU format
    1612 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    461
  • Formats:
    docx azw lit mobi


The Sixties: Ronald Reagan cherry-picked what he wanted and used the rest as a reason to oppose government . As a bonus, von Bothmer's lively use of primary sources and fluid writing style makes Framing the Sixties an enjoyable read.

The Sixties: Ronald Reagan cherry-picked what he wanted and used the rest as a reason to oppose government; George H. W. Bush condensed them into the 'Vietnam Syndrome' that he used for another war; Bill Clinton ran parallel to the decade for political safety; George W. Bush twisted the Sixties to defeat one of its iconic figures, John Kerry. I recommend it to all, but especially anyone who was around in these times.

Framing the Sixties book. In addition to analyzing the pronouncements of the presidents themselves, von Bothmer draws on interviews he conducted with more than one hundred and twenty cabinet members, speechwriters, advisers, strategists, historians, journalists, and activists from across the political spectrum - from Julian Bond, Daniel Ellsberg, Todd Gitlin, and Arthur Schlesinger to James Baker, Robert Bork, Phyllis Schlafly, and Paul Weyrich.

In Framing the Sixties, Bernard von Bothmer examines this battle over . George H. Bush’s positions on the critical issues of the 1960s played a prominent role in his presidency

In Framing the Sixties, Bernard von Bothmer examines this battle over the collective memory of the decade primarily through the lens of presidential politics. What this book documents is the extent to which political leaders, left and right, consciously exploited those divisions by framing the memory of that turbulent decade to serve their own partisan interests. eISBN: 978-1-61376-052-9. Subjects: Sociology, History. Bush’s positions on the critical issues of the 1960s played a prominent role in his presidency. He referred often to the Vietnam War as well as to the civil rights movement.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Dr. Bernard von Bothmer on "Framing the Sixties". com: Framing the Sixties: The Use and Abuse of a Decade from Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush (9781558497320): Bernard von Bothmer: Books. Bernard is speaking at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco tonight. Speaker Nancy Pelosi & Dr. Bernard von Bothmer, Author, "Framing the Sixties".

In Framing the Sixties, Bernard von Bothmer examines this battle over the collective memory of the decade primarily through the lens of presidential politics

In Framing the Sixties, Bernard von Bothmer examines this battle over the collective memory of the decade primarily through the lens of presidential politics.

Use and Abuse of a Decade from Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush.

Framing the Sixties : The Use and Abuse of a Decade from Ronald Reagan to George W. by Bernard von Bothmer. Over the past quarter century, American liberals and conservatives alike have invoked memories of the 1960s to define their respective ideological positions and to influence voters.

Now, as no other historian has done, Bernard von Bothmer follows the trail of the 60s into the presidencies of the 80s, 90s, the 00s and up to the present in Framing the Sixties: The Use and Abuse of a Decade from Ronald Reagan to George W. This book will be invaluable to anyone eager to know the real story behind the political and cultural consequences of that tumultuous time.

Framing the Sixties Exposes the Scapegoating of an Er. Bernard von Bothmer's fascinating look at the 1960's – and the ways the decade has been portrayed by political winners and wannabes – adds an important chapter to our understanding of the domestic right wing.

Framing the Sixties Exposes the Scapegoating of an Era. By. Eleanor J. Bader . While progressives have also called up images from this beleaguered decade, conservatives have triumphed in seven of the last 11 presidential elections – 1968 to 2008 – victories that can be partially attributed to backlash against sixties excesses, both real and imagined. Nostalgia, von Bothmer writes: Don’t miss a beat.

Over the past quarter century, American liberals and conservatives alike have invoked memories of the 1960s to define their respective ideological positions and to influence voters. Liberals recall the positive associations of what might be called the "good Sixties"―the "Camelot" years of JFK, the early civil rights movement, and the dreams of the Great Society―while conservatives conjure images of the "bad Sixties"―a time of urban riots, antiwar protests, and countercultural revolt. In Framing the Sixties, Bernard von Bothmer examines this battle over the collective memory of the decade primarily through the lens of presidential politics. He shows how four presidents―Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush―each sought to advance his political agenda by consciously shaping public understanding of the meaning of "the Sixties." He compares not only the way that each depicted the decade as a whole, but also their commentary on a set of specific topics: the presidency of John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society" initiatives, the civil rights movement, and the Vietnam War. In addition to analyzing the pronouncements of the presidents themselves, von Bothmer draws on interviews he conducted with more than one hundred and twenty cabinet members, speechwriters, advisers, strategists, historians, journalists, and activists from across the political spectrum―from Julian Bond, Daniel Ellsberg, Todd Gitlin, and Arthur Schlesinger to James Baker, Robert Bork, Phyllis Schlafly, and Paul Weyrich. It is no secret that the upheavals of the 1960s opened fissures within American society that have continued to affect the nation's politics and to intensify its so-called culture wars. What this book documents is the extent to which political leaders, left and right, consciously exploited those divisions by "framing" the memory of that turbulent decade to serve their own partisan interests.

Gavirus
The most significant characteristic of a good book is its ability to make the reader think. Judging by the amount of thinking that Framing The Sixties has encouraged me to do, it must be one heck of a good book. As I grew up in the sixties, I remember feelings that were both good and bad. My family started the decade with a TV that delivered black and white images of JFK inspiring us to public service and a trip to the moon. We ended the decade with color images of the Vietnam war and LSD-touting hippies. For us, the war was bad, but so were the hippies. Going to the moon was good, the fear of Russia beating us was not. Our household sympathized with the civil rights movement but extremist groups and images of the Watts Riots made us fearful. Today, I see the sixties as all good--it was a period that made us who we are.

As von Bothmer reveals, politicians have continually resurrected feelings about the sixties to associate themselves with "good" events while encumbering their opponents with all things "bad". He also shows how partisan accounts of this period diverge from the facts. This book is timely, as the facts of history and science are under increasing attacks. It will make a great gift for my friends and relatives.
Haralem
Some of today's younger set often tell us, survivors of the Sixties, "You had ideals, you had goals you wanted to see accomplished, you wanted to change things that were unfair and you made your voices heard ! Now, we worry about finding decent schools, jobs and housing, the next pair of designer sunglasses, and making sure we don't get to know our neighbors too well."

Just as one can write remarkably well about the Roman Empire not having lived through it, Professor von Bothmer has written remarkably well about an era he has studied and dissected. He proves that the decade is still very much alive in today's political world and he really explains how and why.

His objective point of view is powerful in that he doesn't try to influence the reader. He states facts and quotes in a highly readable form. While this reviewer will abstain from giving out personal opinions of those turbulent years, I recommend this book to anyone who wants to remember some of the details or understand the influence many of the events had on those who are today's grown-ups.
Jube
Bought this for a college course on the 1950s and 1960s. This book was read last, and really put the decades into context. It goes through four presidents and how they used the decade to their advantage. I would recommend this for individuals who know a bit more about the decade, and are interested in putting that knowledge in a larger context.
Ice_One_Guys
"So long as politicians who came of age in the 1960s see high office -- and perhaps longer-- the tensions of the era will retain their power", writes historian Bernard von Bothmer. I am not running for office, but I graduated from college in 1969, and those tensions stunted, shaped and inspired my generation. This book which describes how those same tensions are being re-packaged, spun and used today is the book I have been waiting for. Douglas Brinkley got it exactly right in his blurb: "von Bothmer analyzes the spin factor irresponsibly promulgated by both the right and left". I could not wait to get my hands on it, and it has been an utterly fascinating read.
Clonanau
Remarkable that this topic is still interesting and relevant 40+ years on, but von Bothmer pulls it off. Using an incredible array of first person interviews from the left and the right, he manages to connect the dots from the 50s right through the current divide that permeates the American political landscape. Well done.
Nicanagy
Framing the Sixties is an interesting and well researched book about a fascinating time in American History. Von Bothmer explains how the 1960s, like the Civil Ware era, will forever define our Country and how the political landscape of the 60s has shaped current politics and presidential elections. "Indeed both liberals and conservatives agreed that the 1960s gave rise to the two factions that now compete politically" writes von Bothmer. He explains how the ideologies of the 1960s divided many Americans, and how in some ways they have never reunited. Ones learns in this book how the 1960s gave birth to the current Liberal and Conservative movement and why the impact of that decade will not go away.
Fordg
A Timely Book--Even After All These Years

This is a great book. I was right in the middle of it all (Columbia, 1968)but this book gave me a larger perspective and understanding to all of the events that swirlled around me. The basic point that this period shaped much of our political history since then (and still does) is right on the money. As a bonus, von Bothmer's lively use of primary sources and fluid writing style makes Framing the Sixties an enjoyable read. I recommend it to all, but especially anyone who was around in these times.