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by Author,Dave Grossman
Download On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Author,Dave Grossman
  • ISBN:
    1600245935
  • ISBN13:
    978-1600245930
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Little, Brown & Company; Unabridged edition (June 22, 2009)
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1404 kb
  • ePUB format
    1917 kb
  • DJVU format
    1600 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    404
  • Formats:
    lit rtf lrf mbr


Every time I read the book I learn something new, or relearn something I had forgotten. 69 people found this helpful.

Every time I read the book I learn something new, or relearn something I had forgotten.

The good news is that most soldiers are loath to kill. Dave Grossman's thesis, is responsible for our rising rate of murder among the young. Upon its initial The good news is that most soldiers are loath to kill. The simple truth is that for every example author uses to question an individual's willingness to aim a firearm and fire at another human being, anyone with knowledge of military history of 19th century can easily point to an engagement where well-aimed rifled musket/bolt action rifle fire was shockingly effective.

On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society is a book by Dave Grossman exploring the psychology of the act of killing, and the military and law enforcement establishments' attempt to understand and deal with the co. .

On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society is a book by Dave Grossman exploring the psychology of the act of killing, and the military and law enforcement establishments' attempt to understand and deal with the consequences of killing. The book is based on . Marshall's studies from World War II, which proposed that contrary to popular perception, the majority of soldiers in war do not ever fire their weapons, because of an innate resistance to killing

Электронная книга "On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society", Dave Grossman

Электронная книга "On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society", Dave Grossman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

New York: Back Bay Books. Introduction Killing and Science: On Dangerous Ground. This is the time of year when people would slaughter, back when people did that - Rollie and Eunice Hochstetter, I think, were the last in Lake Wobegon. They kept pigs, and they'd slaughter them in the fall when the weather got cold and the meat would keep. I went out to see them slaughter hogs once when I was a kid, along with my cousin and my uncle, who was going to help Rollie

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Authors: Dave Grossman.

Authors: Dave Grossman. And though death was more rare than common (perhaps because he felt the pulse of life 100 KILLING AND PHYSICAL D I S T A N C E and the nearness of death under his fingers), he also had to live his days remembering the man's eyes whose skull he crushed. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

A dynamic man, ON KILLING was hailed as a landmark study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects soldiers, and of the societal implications of escalating violence

A dynamic man, ON KILLING was hailed as a landmark study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects soldiers, and of the societal implications of escalating violence. Now, Grossman has updated this classic work to include information on 21st-century military conflicts, recent trends in crime, suicide bombings, school shootings, and more. The result is a work certain to be relevant and important for decades to come. оставлен porsche mike04. A must read for warriors.

Book details Title: On Killing: The Psychological Cost .

Book details Title: On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society Author: Dave Grossman . Dave Grossman’s thesis, is responsible for our rising rate of murder among the young. Upon its initial publication, On Killing was hailed as a landmark study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects soldiers, and of the societal implications of escalating violence.

Dave Grossman draws unsettling, even sinister parallels between the psychological conditioning required to make soldiers kill in war and the similar effect. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

The good news is that the vast majority of soldiers are loath to kill in battle. Unfortunately, modern armies, using Pavlovian and operant conditioning have developed sophisticated ways of overcoming this instinctive aversion. The psychological cost for soldiers, as witnessed by the increase in post-traumatic stress, is devastating. The psychological cost for the rest of us is even more so: contemporary civilian society, particularly the media, replicates the army's conditioning techniques and, according to Lt. Col. Dave Grossman's thesis, is responsible for our rising rate of murder among the young.Upon its first publication, ON KILLING was hailed as a landmark study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects the soldier, and of the societal implications of escalating violence. Now, Grossman has updated this classic work to include information on 21st-century military conflicts, recent crime rates, suicide bombings, school shootings, and much more. The result is a work that is sure to be relevant and important for decades to come.

Naktilar
As a police officer I just went through a major shooting incident. As I read this book, Col. Grossman went through it with me. He described to a tee every emotion I experienced. Reading this book was extremely helpful.
Shadowredeemer
Lt. Col. Grossman's systematic and thoughtful study of why people kill -- and why they do not -- is important. His analysis on the role of conditioning on overcoming the natural resistance to killing another person provides helpful insight into how and why American society has become increasingly violent in recent decades. The last few chapters, which takes the lessons learned in the rest of the book and applies them to American society, ought to be required reading for those who insist on blaming the tools of violence for the existence of violence.

Thanks, Lt. Col. Grossman, for studying this topic with such rigor and for explaining your work so cogently.
Gabar
An interesting study on killing during war, from the Civil War to the present. Contrary to what one sees through Hollywood's eyes, there is an extreme reluctance for one human being to kill another, even in time of war. Further, the author's findings help explain PTSD, a frequent result found in our combat veterans. Then applied to our society's current ills, he identifies the logical explanation for random mass murders and other mayhem. Overall, it's a thought-provoking read.
Zepavitta
In 1969 I enlisted to do my Patriotic Duty, and chose to be an MP while performing that duty. I was in Vietnam (25th Inf Div for the first 14 months) from January 1970 to March 1972. After the first few months I surely had a monster case of PTSD because that was about when everything began to seem “normal”, but there wasn’t a term for it back then. When I came back from Vietnam my enlistment was up. I got off the plane (Flying Tiger airline), received a meal involving a very tough steak, and was essentially told to “go home and be normal”. My brother, now a retired Marine, had done his tour in Vietnam. I got a job where he worked (he later re-enlisted and completed his 20 for retirement). Several other employees were also Vietnam vets but we never talked about it.
My job involved hard labor and was just what I needed because I really wasn’t fit for polite society for the first year. After a year and a half I applied at several local law enforcement agencies and was hired by one with Civil Service. While working full time I also went back to college and got my degree in Criminal Justice. The image of the Vietnam Vet back then was of a deranged person who climbed onto a rooftop and started shooting people. I didn’t discuss Vietnam, or my recurring “Vietnam Dream”, with anybody. I needed the job, I liked the job, and I didn’t want people to think that I was crazy. Frankly, I wasn’t totally sure that I wasn’t, at least to some degree.
After about twenty years on the dept, and I was a Lt. by then, I was assigned to attend a seminar on Deadly Force and Pursuit Policies. One of the instructors was a Psychologist who covered the symptoms of PTSD. I suddenly realized that after my return from Vietnam I had fit the profile perfectly.
After retirement I was a Federal Courthouse Security Officer for eleven years. Another CSO had a copy of “On Killing” by Lt. Col. David Grossman and I read it, several times. Since then I have purchased my own copy, twice. I think that Grossman got it about 90+% right. I am not going to pick the book apart because, as Jesus warned, “while you are pulling the weeds, you may root up the wheat with them”. Also, I could be in error about that other 10%. Every time I read the book I learn something new, or relearn something I had forgotten. I recommend this book most highly to every combat veteran and law enforcement officer!
Molotok
This is required reading in military leadership courses and extremely insightful. I would strongly recommend this book for any service members (I'm a retired Soldier), law enforcement, or psychologists and clinical social workers (my wife is an LCSW) who work with military or law enforcement. I read this book after my second combat deployment when I had a lot weighing on my mind and it really put things into prospective for me.
Vozuru
Spot on.
Bluddefender
An excellent explanation about the psychology killing. It is frightening as he explains the Pavlovian conditioning given to modern soldiers and police.
As a combat veteran from RVN and a career Infantry Officer I found this read to be interesting and should be reading for young men and women thinking about going into the service, especially one of the combat arms and for the spouses and partners of military members. His references gave the book credibility. Enjoyed the book.