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by Hannes Wessels
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Hannes Wessels
  • ISBN:
    1920143491
  • ISBN13:
    978-1920143497
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    30 Degrees South Publishers (October 15, 2010)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1786 kb
  • ePUB format
    1879 kb
  • DJVU format
    1398 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    273
  • Formats:
    docx txt rtf lit


HANNES WESSELS was born in 1956 in Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe) but grew up in Umtali . I put 'Lightweight' in those inverted commas because that is how Pieter van der Byl liked to present himself

I put 'Lightweight' in those inverted commas because that is how Pieter van der Byl liked to present himself. Why he did this is not too hard to guess: he wanted to put people at ease and so adopted the pose of many a CEO and aristocrat, and let himself be disarmingly silly.

ISBN: 1920143491; Издательство: 30 Degrees South Publishers. Much can be contested about PK van der Byl but few will dispute he was an extremely colorful character with a devilish sense of humor. Historically relevant and important, with much previously unpublished political information, PK van de Byl's story is controversial, uncompromising and 'in-your-face', but also eminently readable, laced with anecdotes and humor. Much can be contested about PK van der Byl but few will dispute he was an extremely colorful character with a devilish sense of humor OZON. Похожие книги: Humor In Der Arabischen Kultur, Humor in Arabic Culture.

The narrative gives the reader an overview of the history of the white man.

Van der Byl was born and raised in Cape Town, the son of the South African politician P V van der Byl, and .

Van der Byl was born and raised in Cape Town, the son of the South African politician P V van der Byl, and served in the Middle East and Europe during the Second World War. After a high-flying international education, he moved to the self-governing British colony of Southern Rhodesia in 1950 to manage family farms. His extreme views and brusque manner made him a surprising choice for a diplomat (a November 1976 profile in The Times described him as "a man calculated to give offence"). After offending the South African government, Van der Byl was removed from the Defence Ministry.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Hannes Wessels books online. Notify me. Pk Van Der Byl. Hannes Wessels. Strange Tales from the African Bush. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. A handful of hard men.

Pk Van Der Byl African Statesman. Are you sure you want to remove Hannes Wessels from your list?

Hannes Wessels is one of the most talented writers that we at Safari Press have read in a long time. Wessels also weighs in on his own experience when he tells of being seriously gored by a buffalo.

Hannes Wessels is one of the most talented writers that we at Safari Press have read in a long time. This former PH in Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe writes tales of hapless figures and derring-do gone wrong that will make you laugh out louda rarity in the cut-and-dry genre of big-game hunting. Whether telling the story of rafting down an uncharted river to set up a new safari camp or highlighting the experiences of a PH such as Lew Games, you will find Wessels's stories so entertaining that you'll be sorry when the book ends.

University of Pretoria. Class of 1984 · Civil engineering · Pretoria, South Africa. Pretoria, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Current City and Home Town.

Price comparison results showing the cheapest place to get Pk Van Der Byl An African Diplomat. We are now comparing your books price at all the online stores. Due to internet traffic it can take anywhere from 20 - 60 seconds so please be patient. Realtime Price Comparison Results For: PK van der Byl: An African Diplomat. Author(s): Hannes Wessels Publish Date: 2010 Publisher: 30 Degrees South Publishers Format: Paperback ISBN 10: 1920143491 ISBN 13: 9781920143497.

Controversial, charming, provocative and infuriating, PK is a fascinating character, and by over-praising him, Wessels does not do him justice: still, the book is. .P. K. van der Byl. Rhodesian African Rifles. Rhodesian Bush War. Rhodesian Light Infantry.

Controversial, charming, provocative and infuriating, PK is a fascinating character, and by over-praising him, Wessels does not do him justice: still, the book is invaluable for anyone interested in Southern African cultural and political history.

Historically relevant and important, with much previously unpublished political information, PK van de Byl's story is controversial, uncompromising and ‘in-your-face', but also eminently readable, laced with anecdotes and humor. The narrative gives the reader an overview of the history of the white man in southern Africa with detailed emphasis on the Rhodesian story through the life and times of PK van der Byl; one of the major players in a political drama that ended in the accession to power of Robert Mugabe under the auspices of the British government led by then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. By his very nature PK was controversial and confrontational. This account is likely to give offense to some because it portrays him as bluntly as he was in real life. Much can be contested about PK van der Byl but few will dispute he was an extremely colorful character with a devilish sense of humor. This memoir covers his life with a full flourish while doing nothing to detract from the seriousness of the international political and military conflict in which he was engaged. The reader will glean new information on a highly controversial subject and emerge with a more sympathetic understanding of what PK van der Byl and his colleagues did and strove for. The human tragedy that has followed the removal from power of Ian Smith and his Rhodesian Front party will almost certainly force the reader to deal with some uncomfortable conclusions, of value to anyone sincere about grappling with the volatile and deeply troubling challenges that confront all Africans today.

Malien
I put 'Lightweight' in those inverted commas because that is how Pieter van der Byl liked to present himself. Why he did this is not too hard to guess: he wanted to put people at ease and so adopted the pose of many a CEO and aristocrat, and let himself be disarmingly silly. When he was at Cambridge, his drawling manner and bespoke tailoring got him the sobriquet "The Piccadilly Dutchman," and this was perfectly fine with him, so long as he wasn't alienating people. He figured out early on that this would always be the big hazard. He was too moneyed, too suave, too privileged, too handsome (never mind that uncharacteristic cover photo with the unfurling pompadour, cigarette and snarl; he's about 55 there and undoubtedly a little sloshed).

And lucky. How lucky? He goes elephant-hunting, and his first kill, an African bull, is the biggest elephant ever measured; its remains are now on display in New York at the Museum of Natural History. His first and only marriage, at age 56, is not only a very successful one, to judge by the offspring and his widow's fondness, but is to a Hapsburg princess. The princess's Uncle Otto, heir and pretender to the throne of the Holy Roman Empire, just happened to be one of PK's best friends and confidants, to the extent that he made PK a key member of his Catholic Conservative European think tank (although PK himself was neither Catholic nor European by nationality--now that's what comes of having the right people like you).

Unlucky PK was only in tobacco farming, which he jumped into feet-first without ever having seen a tobacco plant. Perhaps also in diplomacy, but you know the story. He was a foreign minister, but of a country that was recognized by only one other, and that happened to be South Africa. And Prime Minister Botha didn't like him, or felt that it was diplomatically advantageous not to like him. Thus ended PK's career as foreign minister, but Rhodesia was going down the tubes anyway, thanks in part to Botha, who decided to feed Rhodesia to the crocodiles in order to buy a little more time for his own satrapy.

I suppose PK was also unlucky with the press. The God-awful, poltroonish campaign of slander against Rhodesia that was waged by the London journalists (Max Hastings, yes, but also Peregrine Worsthorne, of all people) is still mind-boggling. PK retired to the Cape Town area, where his people had lived for hundreds of years. He raised his family and lived out a long and full life despite all odds. How's that Mugabe thing working out for you, 'Zimbabwe'?
HyderCraft
A fascinating portrayal of a unique personality and family, interwoven with an excellent account of that period of history. Frustrating to contemplate what might have been if Rhodesia had have been given the opportunity to succeed. Rhodesia was imperfect, but when compared to what replaced it, it's hard to argue the average Zimbabwean is now better off. If the white population had been encouraged to remain, increase and contribute, instead of being hounded out of the country, a successful and harmonious black / white partnership may have been forged and subsequently prospered. This book covers this angle really well, and gives another perspective to the usual tired cries of white self hating, cultural marxism, imperialism and exploitation that get shouted at anyone who questions the prevailing socialist wisdom.
Legionstatic
A fascinating portrayal of a unique personality and family, interwoven with an excellent account of that period of history. Frustrating to contemplate what might have been if Rhodesia had have been given the opportunity to succeed. Rhodesia was imperfect, but when compared to what replaced it, it's hard to argue the average Zimbabwean is now better off. If the white population had been encouraged to remain, increase and contribute, instead of being hounded out of the country, a successful and harmonious black / white partnership may have been forged and subsequently prospered. This book covers this angle really well, and gives another perspective to the usual tired cries of racism, imperialism and exploitation that get shouted at anyone who questions the prevailing socialist wisdom.
Kendis
I would recommend this book only if you are already interested in Zimbabwe and how it is today, or if you want to read a biography of a major character in Rhodesia's history besides Ian Smith.

This book is important to Zimbabwean/Rhodesian history for the new information it presents on PK van der Byl, a previously untouched subject. In that it's an important contribution to the field. However, its execution is lacking.

First, the good. The author had intimate knowledge of the subject, and was therefore able to gain access to heaps of primary sources such as interviews from all the major characters in Mr. van der Byl's life--and a lot of previously unpublished photos. Thus, others hoping to study Rhodesian politics now have another great reference at their disposal.

However, there are a number of drawbacks. This book is poorly organized. Of course it details Mr. van der Byl chronologically, but there are so many random facts and long extended quotations haphazardly thrown in (almost peripheral at times in relation to the subject) that it's difficult to keep everything straight. As a result, if you were not a participant in the events (which I was not but have read a good deal about) the picture is rather fuzzy. I can't help but wonder that the author assumes the reader will come to the table with a fair amount of knowledge about the events unfolding in the book. But if that is the case, then why does the author attempt to tie van der Byl into Southern Africa's white history in general? Wouldn't a highly literate reader already be able to make those connections? Such are the incongruities of this book.

Second is the issue of bias. Mr. Wessels claims that his book "portrays him [van der Byl] as bluntly as he was in real life." But if this is the case, then why does the book really fail to criticize van der Byl at any point? Mr. Wessels does not certainly take a hard look. He tells a number of bawdy stories regarding van der Byl, but Wessels spends a fair amount of his energy trying to justify van der Byl and Rhodesia. Over and over again Wessels mentions atrocities conducted by black Africans (and seems to relish in showing those bits), but there is hardly a word of criticism of the basically authoritarian regime of Ian Smith's itself. Was van der Byl an angel? Probably not. The problem, thus, is more the result of the author in cozying up so much to his subject (and the subject's family, as there's a picture of them together) that he had to--intentionally or not--portray a flattering portrait. I will give him the benefit of the doubt.

Therefore, I would recommend this book to any person strongly interested in Zimbabwean history (though the author never hesitates to throw in the word "Rhodesia" when possible). For all of its shortcomings, it is important because of the previously unstudied subject matter. However, take the author's spin with a large grain of salt.