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by Esad Boskailo,Julia Lieblich
Download Wounded I Am More Awake: Finding Meaning after Terror fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Esad Boskailo,Julia Lieblich
  • ISBN:
    0826518265
  • ISBN13:
    978-0826518262
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vanderbilt University Press (April 24, 2012)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1400 kb
  • ePUB format
    1562 kb
  • DJVU format
    1929 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    929
  • Formats:
    txt lrf docx rtf


Wounded I Am More Awake is a clear-eyed gem of a memoir with a message far beyond one man's experience. It tells Boskailo's story artfully

Wounded I Am More Awake is a clear-eyed gem of a memoir with a message far beyond one man's experience. It tells Boskailo's story artfully. Above all, Boskailo's courage and empathy help us imagine how it is possible to transcend the worst sufferings one human can impose on another. -The Chicago Tribune. Employing a human-rights framework rather than a theological one, this book illustrates how storytelling can be healing-a timely lesson for congregants, churches, and clergy as they grapple with the problem of evil in an age of terror.

Wounded I Am More Awake book. Is it possible to find meaning after end Wounded I Am More Awake follows the story of Esad Boskailo, a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia and emerges with powerful new lessons for healing in an age of genocide. Is it possible to find meaning after enduring crimes against humanity? Can people heal after trauma?

Wounded I Am More Awake: Finding Meaning After Terror.

Wounded I Am More Awake: Finding Meaning After Terror. Wounded I Am More Awake, co-authored with Esad Boskailo, follows the story of a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia and emerges with powerful new lessons for healing in an age of genocide. Sisters: Lives of Devotion and Defiance.

Wounded I Am More Awake follows the story of Esad Boskailo, a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia and emerges with powerful new lessons . Julia Lieblich, Esad Boskailo.

Wounded I Am More Awake follows the story of Esad Boskailo, a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia and emerges with powerful new lessons for healing in an age of genocide.

Wounded I Am More Awake Finding Meaning after Terror by Julia Lieblich; Esad Boskailo and Publisher Vanderbilt University Press. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780826518279, 0826518273. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780826518255, 0826518257. Purchase and read your book immediately. Listen and follow along as Bookshelf reads to you. Study Tools. Built-in study tools like highlights and more.

3 Esad Boskailo, a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia .

Description this book Wounded I Am More Awake follows the story of Esad Boskailo, a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia and emerges with powerful new lessons for healing in an age of genocide.

About Julia Lieblich. Julia Lieblich, a journalism professor at Loyola University in Chicago, coauthored Wounded I Am More Awake: Finding Meaning after Terror with Esad Boškailo. Sorry, no results for Julia Lieblich on Nieman Foundation but check for results from other Nieman sites at left.

Wounded I Am More Awake follows the story of Esad Boskailo, a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia and emerges with powerful new lessons for healing in an age of genocide

Wounded I Am More Awake follows the story of Esad Boskailo, a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia and emerges with powerful new lessons for healing in an age of genocide. Is it possible to find meaning after enduring crimes against humanity? Can people heal after trauma? Human rights journalist Julia Lieblich takes the reader through Boskailo's early years under Tito to the wars when friends turned on friends.

Wounded I Am More Awake follows the story of Esad Boskailo, a doctor who survives six concentration camps in Bosnia and emerges with powerful new lessons for healing in an age of genocide.

This gripping account raises questions for healers, survivors, and readers striving to understand the reality of war and the aftermath of terror. Is it possible to find meaning after enduring crimes against humanity? Can people heal after trauma?

Human rights journalist Julia Lieblich takes the reader through Boskailo's early years under Tito to the wars when friends turned on friends. She documents his harrowing experiences in the camps, where the men he once joined for coffee murder his best friend from childhood.

But the story does not end there. Boskailo moves to the United States and decides to become a psychiatrist so he can guide survivors through the long-term process of restoring hope. Today, inspired by the late psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl, Boskailo uses his own experience to help patients mourn their losses and find meaning in the aftermath of terror.


Nalmergas
Lieblich and Boškailo have written an eloquent book that somehow finds words to describe the ineffable suffering of victims of torture. The stories are searing, the lessons deep. Boškailo is a psychiatrist who likens the recovery process to cardiology: "When a patient has heart surgery, the only predictive factor for recovery is how much reserve the heart has. [He] thought about the reserve in his patients' hearts. . . . Sometimes we can reclaim our dignity just by recognizing that we did not fight violence with violence when our friends betrayed us. If I learned one thing in the camps, it is that we have the ability to choose our attitude and actions in the direst of circumstances."

People use the term existentialism loosely, yet this book shows us the true meaning of the philosophy. Even though the horror of "'never again' happened again and again," the authors find hope in the way survivors not only find but exalt their humanity.

This book will change you . . . for the better.
Fenrikasa
This book, along with Viktor Frankl's "Man's Search for Meaning", should be a mandatory textbook for all humanities and social studies undergraduate programs around the world. With courage and frankness, Lieblich and Boskailo call things by their true names, be it the UN, EU and US failures in Bosnia, the genocide and the atrocities that were committed there, or the personal losses and responsibilities of the individual. Highly competent in their respective fields of journalism and psychiatry, they do not shy away from difficult questions of political, philosophical, psychological, and spiritual nature. These 170 pages are packed with value, providing clarity and eloquence and making this book sufficient by itself for the reader who does not have much background information about the events and ideas in the book. Grounded in the grim realities of the Bosnian genocide in the last decade of the 20th Century, it draws from the best and brightest experts and humanists in diverse fields to keep the reader well informed about every aspect of the book--Viktor Frankl in psychiatry, Noel Malcolm in history, Roy Gutman in journalism, Eric Stover in human rights, Frank Ochberg in trauma work, and many others.
The first part of the book leads us through Dr. Boskailo's experience of the Bosnian war, the ordeal of the concentration camps, his healing and defiant triumph. This defiant triumph of the human spirit is very characteristic of Bosnia itself, best expressed by the famous Bosnian proverb putting a limit to human irresponsibility: You can do whatever you want, but not as long as you want to. The second part is about Boskailo's approach to psychotherapy, grief and loss work, and "integration" as he calls it. It is a much necessary reminder for all in the helping professions that success in treatment is not just decrease of symptoms, but restoring the individual to a state of mind that is closest to the one before the trauma, with the trauma "integrated" into the person's life. This conceptualization reminds me of the great American thinker and scholar of mythology Joseph Campbell, who said that the dragon you swallow gives you its power. This book leads me to conclude that just as the individual heals and integrates by restoration to a state before the trauma, the same must be true for communities and countries. This is not only a roadmap to the individual's integration, but also to Bosnia's integration, which still suffers under apartheid and ethnic divisions. Also, the need to come to terms with one's losses applies to institutions too--the UN and EU in particular lost their moral compass in Bosnia. The crisis in the EU did not start in Greece, but in Bosnia, with the betrayal of "Never Again."

Roumen Bezergianov, author of "Character Education with Chess"
Whitemaster
Well written account of what NEVER should have happened after the horror of the Holocaust. Apparently, NEVER AGAIN, does not mean NEVER AGAIN. After the Nazi's Holocaust one would never believe man would commit "ethnic cleansing" or attempt genocide again especially in a country that was already subjected to such hatred. However, human history has its dark side and this is one . . .
This firsthand account deals with the struggles during and in the aftermath of such horror and how one's puts their life back together. There are many examples as the subject chooses to treat those affected by terror/PTSD and then how to deal with the aftermath of survivorship. Great interplay between the author and the subject and their personal journey through this dark chapter in human history. I would highly recommend this book to medical professionals who deal with such tragedy, military medical personnel dealing with the wounded and tortured in POW camps and those interested in history. It is tragic in many places but there are areas of hope as well.
Overall, high ratings as the book is well written and the author is able to take you right there with their visual imagery.
Wyameluna
It takes great courage on the part of survivors to tell their stories publicly. In this well written book, Esad Boskailo faces his memories and feelings so that others can understand and benefit from his own trauma. As a psychiatrist, he stands on the inside and outside of his own experiences which is only enhanced by teaming up with journalist Julia Lieblich. Esad's life is a monument to an obvious commitment to 'give back' to his community and this book is just another example. I want to thank them for the privilege to read such an insightful book.