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by Charles B. Maurer
Download Call to Revolution: The Mystical Anarchism of Gustav Landauer fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Charles B. Maurer
  • ISBN:
    0814314414
  • ISBN13:
    978-0814314418
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wayne State University Press; 1st edition (January 1, 1971)
  • Pages:
    222 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1358 kb
  • ePUB format
    1401 kb
  • DJVU format
    1623 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    421
  • Formats:
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Maurer, Charles . 1933-; Paul Avrich Collection (Library of Congress) DL.

Maurer, Charles . 1933-; Paul Avrich Collection (Library of Congress) DLC. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by chrissy-robinson on September 14, 2017. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014). 1933-. Landauer, Gustav, 1870-1919. Detroit, Wayne State University Press. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on October 8, 2013.

Call to revolution; book. Gustav Landauer was a thinker and critic of middling importance during the fin de siecle who met his death as so many thinkers and critics do being beaten death in prison

Call to revolution; book. Gustav Landauer was a thinker and critic of middling importance during the fin de siecle who met his death as so many thinkers and critics do being beaten death in prison. That was the bloody heyday of the post-war Bavarian "revolution", so prison beatings were par for the course, keeping the bench warm for those Nazi guys right around the corner.

Landauer supported anarchism already in the 1890s. Call to Revolution: The Mystical Anarchism of Gustav Landauer. Wayne State University Press, 1971). In those years, he was especially enthusiastic about the individualistic approach of Max Stirner and Friedrich Nietzsche, but also "cautioned against an apotheosis of the unrestrained individual, potentially leading to the neglect of solidarity". Landauer believed that social change could not be achieved solely through control of the state or economic apparatus, but required a revolution in interpersonal relations.

Call to Revolution and Mystical Anarchism - Free download as PDF File . df), Text File . xt) or read online for free. Call to Revolution and Mystical Anarchism. For these and other reasons Charles B. Maurer's book, the first one to make Landauer's life and thought known, in extenso, to the English-speaking world, is both timely and "relevant.

Landauer’s anarchism was suffused with his reading of his Jewishness . New Perspectives on Anarchism Maurer, C. (1971) Call to Revolution, the Mystical Anarchism of Gustav Landauer. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.

Landauer’s anarchism was suffused with his reading of his Jewishness, and as such, although he prefigures Derrida and Agamben in many ways, he ultimately refused to completely reject the sovereignty of the subject, providing a means by which to engage European political theory with indigenous struggles in the world today. New Perspectives on Anarchism. Boulder: Lexington Books, pp. 189–209. Hutchings, K. (2008) Time and World Politics: Thinking the Present. Maurer, C. Mendes-Flohr, P. (2015) Introduction.

the mystical anarchism of Gustav Landauer. by Charles B. Maurer. Published 1971 by Wayne State University Press in Detroit. Gustav Landauer (1870-1919). Bibliography: p. 207-211.

Call to Revolution: The Mystical Anarchism of Gustav Landauer. Michael Löwy, Redemption & Utopia: Jewish Libertarian Thought in Central Europe, a Study in Elective Affinity. Translated by Hope Heaney. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1992. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1949.

Landauer’s was a Romantic, non-doctrinaire anarchism which, although rooted in the ideas of Proudhon and .

Landauer’s was a Romantic, non-doctrinaire anarchism which, although rooted in the ideas of Proudhon and Kropotkin, went unashamedly against the grain of the anarchist orthodoxy of late 19th and early 20th century Europe. On completion of his Gymnasium studies Landauer moved on to the universities of Heidelberg, Berlin and Strasbourg where he pursued courses in German philosophy, history and culture.

Book by Maurer, Charles B