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by Douglas Smith
Download Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Douglas Smith
  • ISBN:
    087580246X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0875802466
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Northern Illinois University Press; 1 edition (May 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    267 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1874 kb
  • ePUB format
    1568 kb
  • DJVU format
    1258 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    995
  • Formats:
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Working the Rough Stone is a great examination of the Masonic movement during the reign of Catherine II (the Great) in Russia

Working the Rough Stone is a great examination of the Masonic movement during the reign of Catherine II (the Great) in Russia. This is a great work for anyone interested in the socio-cultural context behind the reign of Catherine the Great.

Working the Rough Stone book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Working the Rough Stone book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

p. 227 n. 16) Surely, if there is some truth to the claim that Freemasonry is not a marginal historical phenomenon (p. 178), and.

Working the Rough Stone. Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia

Working the Rough Stone. Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia. Part of the process of Westernization begun by Peter the Great, Freemasonry flourished in Russia throughout the second half of the eighteenth century when thousands of brothers attended a large network of lodges extending from St. Petersburg to Siberia. Overview of the Book. Part of the process of Westernization begun by Peter the Great, Freemasonry flourished in Russia throughout the second half of the eighteenth century when thousands of brothers attended a large network of lodges extending from S. .

Douglas Smith is an American writer, historian and translator best known for his books about the history of Russia. Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia. Northern Illinois University Press, 1999. Smith was born and raised in Minnesota. After studying German and Russian at the University of Vermont, he earned a PhD in History from the University of California, Los Angeles. He has also worked for the US Department of State in the Soviet Union, and as a Russia analyst for Radio Free Europe  .

By "working the rough stone" of their inner thoughts and feelings, such men sought to become champions of moral .

By "working the rough stone" of their inner thoughts and feelings, such men sought to become champions of moral enlightenment and to create a vision of social action that could bring about change without challenging the social and political precepts on which Russia's stability depended. By challenging a number of long-held notions about Russian society, Smith broadens our understanding of the complex history of eighteenth-century Russia

Smith, p. 4. argaret C. Jacob, 'Freemasonry and the Utopian Impulse, in Millenarianism and Messianism', in Richard H. Popkin (e. SLAVIC REV. Marc Raeff.

Smith, p. English Literature and Thought, 1650-1800: Clark Library Lectures, 1981-1982 (Leiden: Brill, 1988), pp. 138-9. For an English translation and detailed analysis see: Raffaella Faggionato A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth-Century Russia: The Masonic Circle of . N Trubetskoi (Moscow, 1784).

Items related to Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society .

Items related to Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society i.Smith, Douglas Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia (NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies). "Working the Rough Stone, built on a rich documentary base and catholic in scope, is a solid contribution to the study of early modern Russian elite culture. ―Slavic and East European Journal.

Douglas Smith, Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia

Douglas Smith, Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 1999. Smith’s work is well documented and contains an extensive bibliography not only on Russian Freemasonry, but also on Freemasonry as a whole, from its Scot-tish origins to its spread across the continent.

Stone : Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia .

Working the Rough Stone : Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia. An examination of the forces that attracted many social and intellectual leaders of 18th-century Russia to Freemasonry as an instrument for change and progress. By working the rough stone of their inner thoughts and feelings, such men sought to become champions of moral enlightenment and to create a vision of social action that could bring about change without challenging the social and political precepts on which Russia's stability depended.

Using a wealth of archival sources previously unavailable to scholars, Smith examines the forces that attracted many social and intellectual leaders of eighteenth-century Russia to Freemasonry as an instrument for change and progress. By "working the rough stone" of their inner thoughts and feelings, such men sought to become champions of moral enlightenment and to create a vision of social action that could bring about change without challenging the social and political precepts on which Russia's stability depended. By challenging a number of long-held notions about Russian society, Smith broadens our understanding of the complex history of eighteenth-century Russia. Engagingly written and richly illustrated with rare engravings of Masonic life and ritual, this volume will appeal to readers interested in Russia, Europe, the Enlightenment, and the history of Freemasonry.


Wenaiand
Working the Rough Stone is a great examination of the Masonic movement during the reign of Catherine II (the Great) in Russia. The book is well-researched (the author includes a review of the scholarship available on the topic), presents interesting conclusions, and reads well and quickly. This is a great work for anyone interested in the socio-cultural context behind the reign of Catherine the Great.
Ubrise
With a wealth of archival sources previously unavailable, this first study of eighteenth-century Russian Freemasonry to appear in English examines the Masonic lodges and their meaning for the men who were drawn to them. As some of the earliest organizations in Russia to open membership beyond social class, the lodges offered the opportunity for social interaction, personal discipline, and a free exchange of ideas. Teaching new standards of civility and politeness, they helped to prepare the way for the birth of a civil society in Russia. WORKING THE ROUGH STONE reveals the private world of Masonic lodges and the significance of the brothers' rituals and practices. By "working the rough stone" of their inner thoughts and feelings, the social and intellectual leaders who belonged to the lodges sought to distinguish themselves as champions of moral enlightenment. As men of conscience and superior moral worth, many envisioned a future of social action that could bring about change without challenging the social and political precepts on which Russia's stability depended. In addition to exploring the inner workings of the Masonic lodges, WORKING THE ROUGH STONE shows how Freemasonry became part of a larger social transformation that saw the development of salons, literary circles, and learned societies. As quiet shelters for men of learning and conscience, these institutions offered a social alternative to life at the tsarist court. The lodges thus played an important role in fashioning personal and social identities at a time when questions of identity were widely debated in Russia. During the reign of Catherine the Great, the lodges were perceived as havens for democratic ideas dangerous to the aristocracy, and many of them were forced to close their doors. Freemasonry would eventually flourish again in Russia, although the lodges' fortunes have fluctuated with history's upheavals. For Smith, Freemasonry is a prism through which to view changes in Russian society Anyone interested in Russia, Europe during the Enlightenment, and the history of Freemasonry will find WORKING THE ROUGH STONE rich with insight into the hidden social nexuses that created cultural politics in the 18th century.
Marirne
Great reading material. Every rough stone will turn in to a workable stone by using these guidelines. I really enjoyed it
Nothing personal
Excellent book to people that wish to understand as the masons acted in Russia in past.
Ucantia
This is a very rich and detailed book, which makes one meditate on how varied Russian Freemasonry was, while in a sense being somewhat imported (from Sweden). It doesn't raise the more foundational question of whether Russian society at the time could have actually supported Freemasonry as a phenomenon, at least in the same form it existed in the rest of Europe. But it brings one into fascinating corners of endeavor that are often overlooked in relation to Russian history, if one looks at the major histories. At any rate it all seems very elegant and refined, so unlike all the nutty, pathetic and lunatic fringe of anti-Masonic conspiracy theorists operating in Russia today imagining Masonry behind every bush. Where there is ignorance and lack of education, and lack of personal integrity people will create whatever they want. It all has nothing to do with Freemasonry or its humane goals in the world.
Cerar
Dear Douglas Smith,
Unfortunately, my English is not so good to read your book in English - but the reviews of your books about Russia (which I've read here) make me turn to you. Tell me please, what your book published in Russian (or will be publish in Russia)? - I'd like to read them in Russian. Another reason why I am asking you, is as follows.
I read that Shekhar Kapur will shoot TV's "Rasputin", and that Paul Scheuring, will write the script of this film based on YOUR book, dear Douglas Smith. I have no doubt that you and Paul Scheuring will write a great script. I just want to suggest you familiarize yourself with some of my studies on this topic.. I've dealt with this topic - perhaps some of my research and my scripts can be useful in your work on this TV series .
I'm screenwriter of the documentary and feature films about Nicholas II ("The Emperor, who knew the fate"), in which Rasputin was one of the characters . My documentary ( 2009, see [...] ) received several top awards at international film festivals in Russia and Ukraine (including two awards for Best Screenplay ). My script for a feature film (about Nicholas II ) liked the famous Russian film director Vladimir Khotinenko (but he could not find funding sources in Russia) .
You can also see my big book about Nicholas II on Amazon (in Russian):
http://www.amazon.com/Imperator-kotoryy-sudbu-Rossiya-kotoraya/dp/5977506910/ref=la_B009HTVPLS_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1393496039&sr=1-10
and a small brochure “Rasputin. False myths and unknown true” (in English):
http://www.amazon.com/Rasputin-False-myths-true-Romanov-ebook/dp/B00IHJ2TY6/ref=la_B009HTVPLS_1_12?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1393496039&sr=1-12

I suggest you my help (as a consultant) on your television series about Rasputin . I can send you (free) text of my brochure "Rasputin. False myths and unknown true" (in English) , as well as my script for a feature film “The Emperor who knew the Fate” (in Russian).
My page on IMDbPro:
[...]

With kind regards and best wishes
Boris Romanov
Sankt Peterburg, Russia
[email protected]

P.S.
Rasputin. False myths and unknown true.
Summary
Biography Rasputin described in detail in hundreds of books and articles. The author of this brochure was not intended to write another detailed biography. Several little-known and most controversial topics accentuated here:
- When, how and for what purpose were created false myths about Rasputin . This part of the brochure also contains the latest versions of the political crisis in the autumn of 1916 Russia , which have been linked to corruption in organizations headed by opposition leaders.
- Sexuality and " debauchery " Rasputin - myths or reality? The author presents his version of the theme.
- What was actually a character and outlook of Rasputin? What was his influence on the policies of Nicholas II? - The author describes the previously little-known version, based on the memoirs of the head of the Police Department , whose agents watched Rasputin in 1913-1916.
The last chapter of this brochuret is an artistic reconstruction of his last day Rasputin ( 16 December 1916 ) - before his assassination . This reconstruction is based on known documents and recollections of participants in those events. This chapter is part of the author's script of the film " The Emperor, who knew the fate."
http://www.amazon.com/Rasputin-False-myths-true-Romanov-ebook/dp/B00IHJ2TY6/ref=la_B009HTVPLS_1_12?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1393496039&sr=1-12