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by Merrill D. Peterson
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Merrill D. Peterson
  • ISBN:
    0813922674
  • ISBN13:
    978-0813922676
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Virginia Press; First Edition edition (April 21, 2004)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1301 kb
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    1470 kb
  • DJVU format
    1584 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    534
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Merrill D. Peterson concentrates on the Armenian genocide as it affected American consciousness, conscience and . Peterson writes on p. 161 that Nazi anti-Semitism "was without parallel in Turkish feelings toward Armenians

Merrill D. Peterson concentrates on the Armenian genocide as it affected American consciousness, conscience and policy. Having already-established contacts within the Armenian communities of the Ottoman Empire, the US was exceptionally poised to offer aid and rescue when the Empire began its desperate ethnic bloodpurge. As one might expect, however, the response was not exactly so forthcoming. 161 that Nazi anti-Semitism "was without parallel in Turkish feelings toward Armenians. Religion, insofar as it was bound up in ethnic identity, was a critical factor in the Holocaust.

Starving Armenians book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Starving Armenians book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Starving Armenians: America and the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1930 and After as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Authors and affiliations. First Online: 08 January 2008. Authors and Affiliations.

There are many similarities between the Armenian Genocide and the Jewish Genocide but they both had different . Peterson was a peace Corps volunteer who went to the country in 1997

There are many similarities between the Armenian Genocide and the Jewish Genocide but they both had different responses which this book highlights. Armenia also wanted to establish an independent republic under American Auspices which did not happen because it was taken over by the Soviet Union. This could be compared to the Jewish Nation trying to establish a Nation together. They both struggle to form their own independent state after such an horrible event. Peterson was a peace Corps volunteer who went to the country in 1997. Remembrance and denial: The case of the Armenian Genocide

the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1930 and After, by Merrill D. Peterson. the genocide between 1915 and 1923

Starving Armenians": America and the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1930 and After, by Merrill D. Charlottesville, VA and London, UK: University of Virginia Press, 2004. the genocide between 1915 and 1923. Twenty years after the publication of Bryson's article, the literature on this subject has remained the same.

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Peterson explores the American response to these atrocities, from initial reports to President Wilson until Armenia's eventual absorption into the Soviet Union. Starving Armenians: America and the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1930 and After. University of Virginia Press. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything.

Similar books and articles. Educating a New Generation: The Model of the Genocide and Human Rights University Program.

The persecution and suffering of the Armenian people, a religious and cultural minority in the Ottoman Empire, reached a peak in the era of World War I at the hands of the Turks. Between 1915 and 1925 as many as 1.5 million Armenian men, women, and children died in Ottoman Turkey, victims of execution, starvation, and death marches to the Syrian desert.

In "Starving Armenians," Merrill Peterson explores the American response to these atrocities, beginning with the initial reports to President Wilson from his Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, Henry Morgenthau, who described Turkey as "a place of horror." The West gradually began to take notice. As the New York Times carried stories about the "slow massacre of a race," public outrage over this tragedy led to an unprecedented philanthropic crusade spearheaded by Near East Relief, an organization rooted in Protestant missionary endeavors in the Near East and dedicated to saving the survivors of the first genocide of the twentieth century. The book also addresses the Armenian aspirations for an independent republic under American auspices; these hopes went unfulfilled in the peacemaking after the war and ended altogether when Armenia was absorbed into the Soviet Union.

Part of a generation who were admonished as children to "remember the starving Armenians," Peterson went to Armenia in 1997 as a Peace Corps volunteer and became fascinated by the country’s troubled history. The extensive research he embarked upon afterwards revealed not only the scope of the people’s hardship and amazing resilience; it located in the American effort to help the Armenians a unique perspective on our own nation’s experience of the twentieth century. "Starving Armenians" is an eloquent narrative of an all but forgotten part of that experience.


Ochach
"Starving Armenians: America and the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1930 and After: by Merrill Peterson, ISBN: 0-8139-2267-4 (2004) Univ. VA Press, HC 178 pgs., 22 illustrations, plus Notes 10 pgs., Index 7 pgs., 6 1/8" x 8 3/4"

Peterson, both historian & published writer, gives a meaty synopsis of Henry Morgenthau's reporting & observations while Ambassaor to Turkey & follows this with 5 chapters entitled: 1. Awakening, 2. Genocide, 3. Near East Relief (NER) in War & Peace, 4. Chaos, Carnage & Survivors, and 5. The Great Betrayal - he concludes with an enticing Epilogue.

Of the now numerous books covering the Armenian Question, Massacres & Genocide - Peterson's is one of the better written & researched chronicles of those events; he provides a good detailed accounting of the NER. In the chapter "The Great Betrayal" he pulls no punches in detailing the machinations behind the overtly indifference of various allied powers on their impotency & failure to taken any military or meaningful political actions; the US resorting instead to basically encourage & promote the US populace to render humanitarian aid via NER & later, its "greatest asset",the "International Golden Rule Sunday" (1924-1931). Standard Oil (New Jersey) under the Rockefeller empire, induced the State Department to use its influence to permit it access to Mesopotamia (Iraqi) oil reserves alongside the Anglo-Persian Company (British) which is akin to BP.

Concluding remarks on immigration quotas, & Turkey's denials of their complicity in the Ottoman massacres, AG, etc. including several scandulous attempts to deny AG through contrary teachings in several American universities are aptly detailed. Peterson presents some important detailed factual information lacking in other treatises.
Fordg
Thank you!
Foginn
Merrill D. Peterson concentrates on the Armenian genocide as it affected American consciousness, conscience and policy. Having already-established contacts within the Armenian communities of the Ottoman Empire, the US was exceptionally poised to offer aid and rescue when the Empire began its desperate ethnic bloodpurge. As one might expect, however, the response was not exactly so forthcoming. Initial moral indignation, familiar cries that one must "do something," deflated over time into the also-familiar language of compassion fatigue: "They have asked for help so much that they are boring us" (p. 98).

The impulse for moral crusade ran up against the brick wall of realpolitik, of the necessity for good relations with the New Turkey; a wall that no US President will stand before while demanding its demolition. From concessions for Standard Oil to the need for NATO security, Turkey has successfully deflected any outside outrage over its various genocides, from Armenians of this book's era to the Kurds of the 1990s. Peterson writes on p. 161 that Nazi anti-Semitism "was without parallel in Turkish feelings toward Armenians. Religion, insofar as it was bound up in ethnic identity, was a critical factor in the Holocaust." With this I strongly disagree: religion per se was a matter of supreme indifference to the Nazi planners of genocide, as it was for the secular nationalist Young Turks.

Despite impassioned calls to turn Armenia into a proto-Israel protectorate, American military power of the time was not up to permanent global force projection. This does beg another issue of realpolitik: a despised minority viewed as aliens by its host nation will always develop sympathetic links with its host's enemies, raising paranoia of a Fifth Column that can intensify its suffering. To what extent are outside "friends" themselves responsible - however indirectly - for their client's persecution? This went unanswered in 1915, and was blithely ignored in the Balkans at the time of this book's writing. But it is so easy to stir a hornet's nest with a long stick, while blaming the resulting carnage on the vicious nature of the aggressor.

The American government and public did what it could, given the limitations of its system and the times. The world was spared a "humanitarian intervention" that could have been as big a disaster as the original catastrophe. The hypocrisy of ramping up relief for a minority persecuted by an enemy state was contrasted by the indifference toward another contemporary ethnic massacre: the Jews in the Ukraine at the hands of Polish, Ukrainian, and White Russian armies. Yet the latter's suffering was ultimately recognized in the face of friendly states. The Armenian oppression, like the Palestinian, has yet to travel the full road to "legitimization."
Orevise
Professor Merrill has written a fascinating book with many lessons. Instructive is the way oil politics at the 1923 Lusanne Conference got in the way of a European response to the national and humanitarian consequences of the Armenians' 20 previous years of suffering Turk inflicted "crimes against humanity" (the word genocide hadn't been coined, but crimes against humanity had been identified at the Versailles Conference). Now the west wants to use human rights to cover the military drive to the middle east oil spigot, thus an instructive irony.
I had experience in Central America in the late 1970s and early 1980s and comparisons with congregationalist ministers in 19th century Armenia and Catholic liberation theologians in Central America are relevant. Also, in both cases the indigenous peoples were wiped off of the map of fertile lowlands and condemned to infertile highlands. The human rights response was similar too with the congregationalist Near East Relief organization comparable to the widespread Catholic church support of Caritas, the Paulists, or others for Central American indigenous peoples under seige.
Also, here in the US Armenian success stories are legion. My family boasts relatives of the Colombosian family, famous for their Colombo yogurt. The Colombosian family lost extensive 1st generation family in the genocide. They continue to support the establishment of the Armenian holocaust museum in Washington DC, among other efforts.