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by Liz Davies
Download Through the Looking Glass: A Dissenter Inside New Labour fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Liz Davies
  • ISBN:
    1859846092
  • ISBN13:
    978-1859846094
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Verso; 1st Edition. edition (June 2001)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1260 kb
  • ePUB format
    1369 kb
  • DJVU format
    1511 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    890
  • Formats:
    docx mbr lit lrf


Through the Looking Glass book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Through the Looking Glass: A Dissenter Inside New Labour as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Through the Looking Glass book. Start by marking Through the Looking Glass: A Dissenter Inside New Labour as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

For two years prior to the party conference of September 2000, Davies sat on the highest body of the party, its National Executive Committee.

Liz Davies Through the Looking Glass, London: Verso, 2001.

Andy McSmith Faces of Labour, London: Verso, 2001, . 35. Peter Barberis, John McHugh, Mike Tyldesley Encyclopedia of British and Irish Political Organizations: Parties, Groups and Movements of the Twentieth Century, London: Pinter, 2000, . 84. Liz Davies Through the Looking Glass, London: Verso, 2001. "Executive wake-up call" Archived 2013-04-24 at Archive. today, Weekly Worker, 454, October 31, 2002.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Through the Looking Glass: A Dissenter Inside . Through the Looking Glass: A Dissenter Inside New Labour

Through the Looking Glass: A Dissenter Inside New Labour. Title : Through the Looking Glass: A Dissenter Inside New Labour. LIKE NEW: Appears unread, may have minor superficial markings. Product Category : Books. Read full description.

In 1998 Liz Davies was elected to Labour's governing body in the face of stiff . Liz Davies' new book, Through The Looking Glass, is published by Verso at £15.

In 1998 Liz Davies was elected to Labour's governing body in the face of stiff resistance from Downing Street. Two-and-a-half years later she left the party denouncing its 'cult-like atmosphere'. It was November 17 1998 and inside Millbank the national executive committee met in "the boardroom", a large meeting room with a grand picture window looking out over the Thames. Those on the top table, including Tony Blair, John Prescott and Margaret McDonagh, were seated with their backs to the window so the the rest of us faced them.

uk's Liz Davies Page and shop for all Liz Davies books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Liz Davies. Through the Looking Glass: A Dissenter Inside New Labour. Eligible for FREE UK Delivery. "Executive wake-up call", Weekly Worker, 454, October 31, 2002.

In Through the Looking Glass: a dissenter inside new Labour (Verso, 15), Liz Davies accuses Blair of betraying everything that Labour once stood for and explains why she left the party after many years of activism

In Through the Looking Glass: a dissenter inside new Labour (Verso, 15), Liz Davies accuses Blair of betraying everything that Labour once stood for and explains why she left the party after many years of activism. A more theoretical critique of the Blairite model of modernisation is offered by Alex Callinicos in Against the Third Way (Polity Press, 1. 9), which is unforgiving of those who seek to blur the distinctions between left and right.

Liz Davies Through the Looking Glass, London: Verso, 2001 ISBN 1-85984-609-2. Liz Davies Through the Looking Glass, London: Verso, 2001 ISBN 1-85984-609-2. "A Spin too Far", Sign of the Times seminar, February 24, 2002 (subsequently updated).

As New Labour prepares the ground for a second term in government, Liz Davies provides a compelling insider’s account of the annihilation of the party’s internal democracy. For two years prior to the party conference of September 2000, Davies sat on the highest body of the party, its National Executive Committee. From this unique viewpoint she reveals in riveting detail the extent to which cynical doublethink has come to permeate the party’s leadership.Focusing particularly on the frenzied attempts to prevent Ken Livingston from becoming London’s next mayor, Davies details how Blair and his acolytes sought to manipulate every detail of the NEC’s proceedings, repeatedly blocking open discussion and the counting of votes. With elected representatives rendered powerless in NEC meetings, full-time officials briefed selected journalists on what was being decided, often hours before the meeting itself took place.Davies chronicles Blair’s evident discomfort in the face of close questioning at the meetings, and his impatience with even the mildest dissent. She exposes the hollowness of John Prescott’s Old Labour credentials as well as the relentless manipulation of Margaret McDonagh, the party’s hard-nosed General Secretary. She watches aghast as trade union representatives repeatedly defy positions adopted by their members, and while special interests, notably those representing business, twist policies to suit their needs.Employing a redoubtable independence of mind, as well as verbatim notes kept in each of the meetings, Davies provides an electrifying picture of the systematic corruption of a major political institution.