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by Anna Stavrianakis
Download Taking Aim at the Arms Trade: NGOS, Global Civil Society and the World Military Order fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Anna Stavrianakis
  • ISBN:
    1848132697
  • ISBN13:
    978-1848132696
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Zed Books (June 15, 2010)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
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    1326 kb
  • ePUB format
    1115 kb
  • DJVU format
    1716 kb
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    4.6
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Anna Stavrianakis is a lecturer in international relations at the University of Sussex. Taking Aim at the Arms Trade.

Anna Stavrianakis is a lecturer in international relations at the University of Sussex. NGOs, Global Civil Society. London & New York

Stavrianakis exposes the tensions inherent in NGOs' engagement with the arms trade and argues for a re-examination of dominant assumptions about NGOs as global civil society actors.

Stavrianakis exposes the tensions inherent in NGOs' engagement with the arms trade and argues for a re-examination of dominant assumptions about NGOs as global civil society actors. Online Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound. Paperback, 224 pages. She earned her PhD in the Department of Politics at the University of Bristol. We are PENNSYLVANIA'S LARGEST USED BOOKSTORE specializing in second-hand and out- of-print scholarly books in all fields! We offer the finest.

Non-governmental organisation (NGO) activism on the arms trade is emblematic of the significant and .

Non-governmental organisation (NGO) activism on the arms trade is emblematic of the significant and emancipatory role attributed to civil society in post-Cold War international politics.

Conceptualising global civil society. 2. What's the problem? NGOs and the arms trade. Mark Duffield, University of Bristol. 3. NGO strategies and the disciplining of global civil society. 4. Arming the North: Transatlantic and European military production and trade. Anna Stavrianakis combines detailed analysis with critical insights in a manner that is both illuminating and stimulating and raises issues that are at the core of civil society.

By: Doctor Anna Stavrianakis. Publisher: Zed Books, Limited. Print ISBN: 9781848132696, 1848132697. eText ISBN: 9781848139008, 1848139004.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781848139008, 1848139004. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781848132696, 1848132697. By: Doctor Anna Stavrianakis.

by Stavrianakis, Anna. Recommend this! Marketplace Prices. All pages and the cover is intact. The spine may show signs of wear. Pages include notes and/or highlighting. Acceptable (readable condition). Pages include considerable notes in pen or highlighter, but the text is not obscured.

This was essential for the development of a new era of global trade.

Taking Aim at the Arms Trade takes a critical look at the ways in which NGOs portray the arms trade as a problem of international politics and the strategies they use to effect change. While NGOs have been pivotal in bringing the suffering caused by the arms trade to public attention and documenting its negative impacts on human rights, conflict, security and development around the world, their overall activity has the perverse effect of justifying the status quo in the arms trade. They unintentionally contribute to the generation of consent for a hierarchical and asymmetrical world military order, facilitating intervention in the global South based on liberal understandings of the arms trade and associated issues of conflict, development and human rights. As a consequence, their actions contribute to the construction of the South as a site of Northern benevolence and intervention, a stark contrast to NGOs' self-image and widespread reputation as progressive actors. In exposing the contradictions inherent in NGOs engagement with the arms trade, Stavrianakis argues forcefully for a change of approach that can avoid such damaging outcomes.