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by Denise Meredyth,Kay Ferres
Download An Articulate Country: Re-Inventing Citizenship in Australia fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Denise Meredyth,Kay Ferres
  • ISBN:
    0702231185
  • ISBN13:
    978-0702231186
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Queensland Pr (Australia) (November 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1626 kb
  • ePUB format
    1530 kb
  • DJVU format
    1737 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    433
  • Formats:
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An Articulate Country: Re-Inventing Citizenship in Australia. Kay Ferres, Denise Meredyth. This article explores the effectiveness of appeals to ‘active citizenship’ as an answer to the ‘neoliberal’ political vocabulary of consumer choice and market freedom. It does so through a case stud. More). 2001, University of Queensland Press. Libraries near you: WorldCat. An Articulate Country: Re-Inventing Citizenship in Australia.

Kay Ferres, Denise Meredyth, An Articulate Country: Reinventing Citizenship in Australia (Cover Image), Queensland University Press, 2001. Richard Nile, The Australian Legend and Its Discontents (Cover Image), Queensland University Press, 2000. David Bennett, Cultural Studies: Pluralism & Theory (Cover Image), Melbourne University Literary & Cultural Studies, University of Melbourne Press, 1993. Richard Nile (e. ‘Country and Calling’ (Cover Image), Journal of Australian Studies University of Queensland Press, 2000 Richard Nile/Michael Williams, (ed.

Her most recent books include An Articulate Country: Reinventing Citizenship in Australia (co-authored with Denise Meredyth, University of Queensland Press, 2001) and Deciphering Culture: Ordinary Curiosities an. .

Her most recent books include An Articulate Country: Reinventing Citizenship in Australia (co-authored with Denise Meredyth, University of Queensland Press, 2001) and Deciphering Culture: Ordinary Curiosities and Subjective Narratives (co-authored with Jane Crisp and Gillian Swanson, Routledge, 2000).

Reinventing Citizenship reveals how race and citizenship transform as they cross countries and continents. By documenting the interconnected histories of African Americans and Koreans in Japan, Tsuchiya enables us to rethink present ideas of community and belonging.

Australian nationality law determines who is and who is not an Australian citizen. The status of Australian nationality or Australian citizenship was created by the Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948 (in 1973 renamed the Australian Citizenship Act. The status of Australian nationality or Australian citizenship was created by the Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948 (in 1973 renamed the Australian Citizenship Act 1948), which came into force on 26 January 1949. The 1948 Act was amended many times, notably in 1973, 1984, 1986 and 2002. It was replaced by the Australian Citizenship Act 2007, which commenced on 1 July 2007.

A citizenship ceremony in Australia. Each country has its own policies, regulations and criteria as to who is entitled to its citizenship. A person can be recognized or granted citizenship on a number of bases. Nationality is often used as a synonym for citizenship in English – notably in international law – although the term is sometimes understood as denoting a person's membership of a nation (a large ethnic group). In some countries, . the United States, the United Kingdom, nationality and citizenship can have different meanings (for more information, see Nationality versus citizenship).

A Foreign Country The Oxford Book of Australian Schooldays (. 91) Melbourne. This paper considers the role of the teacher in relation to moral education in Catholic schools in Australia and Ireland. The Modernisation of Irish Society. Literature pertaining to faith-based schooling, the moral role of the teacher and moral education across the curriculum in both countries is outlined. The paper draws on a small-scale study involving a survey with 154 respondents and individual interviews with nine teachers. Some interesting country differences emerged that are indicative of cultural settings.

For teachers charged with implementing a government-sponsored Discovering Democracy curriculum, this study surveys Australian and North American debates over civics education in a pluralistic society. The authors, presumably educators, discuss Australia's democratic tradition and its agenda for ed