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by Sumit Ganguly,Devin T. Hagerty
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Sumit Ganguly,Devin T. Hagerty
  • ISBN:
    0295985259
  • ISBN13:
    978-0295985251
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ of Washington Pr (July 30, 2005)
  • Pages:
    223 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1399 kb
  • ePUB format
    1479 kb
  • DJVU format
    1228 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    269
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An outstanding book which shows that nuclear weapons are a force for peace, but with major qualifications "Represents a superb effort to understand the impact of nuclear weapons on South Asian stability

An outstanding book which shows that nuclear weapons are a force for peace, but with major qualifications. ―John J. Mearsheimer, University of Chicago. Explains a great deal about. important events, many of them not well known, and about international rivalry in general. Represents a superb effort to understand the impact of nuclear weapons on South Asian stability. ―Ashley J. Tellis, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Fearful symmetry Ganguly, Sumit Hagerty, Devin T. Неизвестно 9780295986357 : Questioning why India and Pakistan have not fought another major war . Fearful symmetry, Ganguly, Sumit Hagerty, Devin T. Варианты приобретения. Неизвестно 9780295986357 : Questioning why India and Pakistan have not fought another major war, this book gives a crisp answer: nuclear weapo.

productive India-Pakistan relationship. This book asks an important question: Why have India and Pakistan not fought a major war in the past two decade? It gives a crisp answer: nuclear weapons. Sumit Ganguly is professor of political science and Rabindranath Tagore Chair of Indian Cultures and Civilizations at Indiana University, Bloomington. Devin T. Hagerty is associate professor of political science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Sumit Ganguly and Devin T. Hagerty carefully analyze each crisis .

Steve CollPulitzer Prize-winning, author of Ghost Wars. An outstanding book which shows that nuclear weapons are a force for peace, but with major qualifications. John J.

Fearful Symmetry book .

Dangerous Deterrent: Nuclear Weapons Proliferation and Conflict in South Asia Stanford, Stanford University Press .

Dangerous Deterrent: Nuclear Weapons Proliferation and Conflict in South Asia Stanford, Stanford University Press, 2007, 262 pages. by Alexandre Hummel By the same author. ISO 690. Hummel Alexandre, SUMIT GANGULY, DEVIN T. HAGERTY Fearful Symmetry : India-Pakistan, Crises in the Shadow of Nuclear WeaponsSeattle, University of Washington Press, 2005, 224 pages. S. PAUL KAPUR Dangerous Deterrent : Nuclear Weapons Proliferation and Conflict in South , Critique internationale, 2008/3 (No 40), p. 159-164.

By Sumit Ganguly and Devin T. Hagerty. These crises are the starting point for Ganguly and Hagerty, whose book is much more original and substantial. Ever since Kenneth Waltz began arguing that not all nuclear proliferation is a bad thing, and that a nuclear balance could stabilize conflicts in the developing world just as it stabilized relations during the Cold War, South Asia has been seen as the key test of this thesis. In the 1970s, both countries began building a nuclear capability, which was confirmed in 1998 by a competitive sequence of test explosions conducted by both sides.

Laadige alla võrguühenduseta lugemiseks, raamatu Fearful Symmetry: India-Pakistan Crises in the Shadow .

Laadige alla võrguühenduseta lugemiseks, raamatu Fearful Symmetry: India-Pakistan Crises in the Shadow of Nuclear Weapons lugemise ajal esiletõstude või järjehoidjate lisamiseks või märkmete tegemiseks.

Fearful Symmetry : India-Pakistan Crises in the Shadow of Nuclear Weapons. With the nuclearization of the Indian subcontinent, Indo-Pakistani crisis behavior has acquired a deadly significance

Fearful Symmetry : India-Pakistan Crises in the Shadow of Nuclear Weapons. by Devin T. Hagerty and Šumit Ganguly. With the nuclearization of the Indian subcontinent, Indo-Pakistani crisis behavior has acquired a deadly significance. The past two decades have witnessed no fewer than six crises against the backdrop of a vigorous nuclear arms race. Except for the Kargil war of 1998-9, all these events were resolved peacefully.

The book’s final chapter offers a step-by-step road map for Washington to. .

The book’s final chapter offers a step-by-step road map for Washington to encourage a more positive Indo-Pakistani relationship. If all that were required was a more proactive . Ganguly and Hagerty display greater faith in the efficacy of deterrence but call on the United States to be more proactive in brokering a political settlement in Kashmir. 1. Sumit Ganguly, Conflict Unending: India-Pakistan Tensions Since 1947 ( New York and Washington, DC: Columbia University Press and Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2001). 2. Glenn Kessler and Robin Wright, Earthquake Aid for Pakistan Might Help . Image, The Washington Post, October 13, 2005.

With the nuclearization of the Indian subcontinent, Indo-Pakistani crisis behavior has acquired a deadly significance. The past two decades have witnessed no fewer than six crises against the backdrop of a vigorous nuclear arms race. Except for the Kargil war of 1998-9, all these events were resolved peacefully.

Nuclear war was avoided despite bitter mistrust, everyday tensions, an intractable political conflict over Kashmir, three wars, and the steady refinement of each side's nuclear capabilities. Sumit Ganguly and Devin T. Hagerty carefully analyze each crisis, reviewing the Indian and Pakistani domestic political systems and key decisions during the relevant period.

This lucid and comprehensive study of the two nations' crisis behavior in the nuclear age is the first work on Indo-Pakistani relations to take systematic account of the role played by the United States in South Asia's security dynamics over the past two decades in the context of unipolarization, and formulates a blueprint for American policy toward a more positive and productive India-Pakistan relationship.


Nidora
This book, by a leading American scholar of South Asia and a leading expert on South Asian nuclear weapons, examines how the assumed existence of nuclear weapons has affected the behavior of the two sides during five separate crises starting in the late 1980s. This same subject is also covered in a book by the leading American scholar on South Asia, Stephen P. Cohen, and two co-authors. I hope to compare their treatment of the same crises. Ganguly and Hagerty argue that nuclear weapons have created a mutual deterrence that benefits the weaker conventional power, Pakistan, at the expense of the stronger power, India, when dealing with Kashmir.
Ustamya
Countries sometimes to act like rival highschool teams. And the more similar the schools (or countries) the stronger the rivalry. In schools they play football. With countries they go to war.

But all of a sudden this doean't work any more. The Cold War never turned very hot. I've often wondered if this was because of nuclear weapons. For once, the old men can't sit around and send young people off to do the fighting. The old men, sitting in their capital building are just as much on the front line as the Grunt carrying a rifle. The longest stretch of time since the Roman era passed with the largest powers going to war.

In this book, the authors describe a similar situation that seems to exist between India and Pakistan. After fighting several smaller wars, both countries obtained atomic weapons. Now they have avoided a war. Did the leaders suddenly realize that their own personal hide was on the line?

Do you think that Osama would think differently if he was convinced that continued bombings might cause a mushroom cloud to grow over Mecca?