» » Dying for Heaven: Holy Pleasure and Suicide Bombers—Why the Best Qualities of Religion Are Also Its Most Dangerous

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by Ariel Glucklich
Download Dying for Heaven: Holy Pleasure and Suicide Bombers—Why the Best Qualities of Religion Are Also Its Most Dangerous fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Ariel Glucklich
  • ISBN:
    0061430811
  • ISBN13:
    978-0061430817
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperOne; 1st edition (November 3, 2009)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1127 kb
  • ePUB format
    1738 kb
  • DJVU format
    1390 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    633
  • Formats:
    txt azw lit lrf


Includes bibliographical references (pages 293-328) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 293-328) and index. Religious and nuclear deterrence - The mysteries of pleasure - The varieties of religious pleasure - The school for happiness - Disgust and desire: why we sacrifice for the group - God's love and the Prozac effect - Spiritual love and the seeds of annihilation - The paradise paradox: the misery of. Heaven-addicts - The martyr's theater.

In Dying for Heaven, Ariel Glucklich argues against the misconception that religious terrorists fight their enemies .

In Dying for Heaven, Ariel Glucklich argues against the misconception that religious terrorists fight their enemies out of hatred. Rather, it is the positive aspects of religion that inspire the most heinous actions. There may be some confusion about the book itself, because the cover and title may lead readers to expect that it's 300 pages of case studies from bombers' lives.

Ariel Glucklichs Dying for Heaven offers a provocative explanation of religion .

Ariel Glucklichs Dying for Heaven offers a provocative explanation of religion and terrorism based on a Darwinian approach. Although not all readers will embrace this analysis, it provides absorbing food for thought and a surprisingly attractive solution for the problem it addresses. is more than 300 pages of gripping analysis about the inner motivations—the high-octane rocket fuel—within religion. He is also the author of many books, including Sacred Pain: Hurting the Body for the Sake of the Soul, which won an award for excellence from the American Academy of Religion; Climbing Chamundi Hill; and The Strides of Vishnu.

Dying for Heaven reveals a groundbreaking theory of religion andreligious destructiveness, providing the key for . To ensure we are able to help you as best we can, please include your reference number: X1ZYII7HPG.

Dying for Heaven reveals a groundbreaking theory of religion andreligious destructiveness, providing the key for understanding thereligious drive to self-destruct, and offering a new vision forpreventing.

Dying for Heaven - Ariel Glucklich.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. This provocative work of political science argues that the very best qualities of religion-its ability to make people feel good and bring them together-are in fact its most dangerous. Glucklich, author of Sacred Pain and Climbing Chamundi Hill, offers a new understanding of religion and provides a vision for preventing further violence. Dying for Heaven - Ariel Glucklich.

Dying for Heaven book. Glucklich, author of Sacred Pain and Climbing Cham In Dying for Heaven, Georgetown scholar and advisor to the defense community Ariel Glucklich explains the religious motivation of terrorism. In Dying for Heaven, Georgetown scholar and advisor to the defense.

In Dying for Heaven, Georgetown scholar and advisor to the defense community Ariel Glucklich explains the .

In Dying for Heaven, Georgetown scholar and advisor to the defense community Ariel Glucklich explains the religious motivation of terrorism.

A scholar and advisor to the Pentagon explains the religious motivations of terrorists, and tells why suicide missions may be rational and pleasurable for them. Recently added by. ArtisteBleue57, Reddog48, armonkallio, jackworthing2002, testVSFS, ACexample, maribou, StevenLJones, faridesack,.

Dying for Heaven: Holy Pleasure and Suicide Bombers–Why the Best Qualities of Religion Are Also its Most Dangerous by Ariel Glucklich (HarperOne, November 3, 2009). Writing about suicide bombers is a crowded field, especially since 9/11. Dying for heaven : holy pleasure and suicide bombers-why the best qualities of religion are.

In Dying for Heaven, Georgetown scholar and advisor to the defense community Ariel Glucklich explains the religious motivation of terrorism. This provocative work of political science argues that the very best qualities of religion—its ability to make people feel good and bring them together—are in fact its most dangerous. Glucklich, author of Sacred Pain and Climbing Chamundi Hill, offers a new understanding of religion and provides a vision for preventing further religiously-inspired violence.

Sagda
Like Philosophy 101. I learned a lot. Glucklich writes well and with humor. I liked his solution to counter religious terrorism.
Gold Crown
Mark Twain famously said "Against the assault of laughter, nothing can stand." Professor Glucklich seems to agree with him, although he did not use the quote. From page 274-289 this book presents an interesting argument that Islamic suicide terrorism can be largely eliminated when the general Muslim culture decides to poke fun at the perpetrators. At present, these societies elevate the murderous martyrs, something that Christianity and Judaism have outgrown. However, honoring the self-destructive in the larger society is only part of the problem. A more complicated aspect is the "happiness" one gets from literally giving "all" to God. It is that argument that Glucklich spends the first 273 pages exploring, and this huge chunk of book was to me boring, confusing, over-detailed with obscure references, and not persuasively stated.

I do not know if Harper Collins, the publisher, assigned a great editor to the professor, who then ignored his or her advice, or if the editor was incompetent or far too timid, but the work to me is just about fatally flawed. As another reviewer, Monica, stated, those last dozen pages should have come first, and then the argument to justify his opinions could have been made. The marketing people, who probably named the book and created the cover blurb, caught my attention on the new book shelf at my public library, and that's why I brought "Dying for Heaven" home three weeks ago. Sadly, I had to force myself to keep plugging away in here, hoping that the book represented on the dust jacket was actually between these covers somewhere. One-third of the way through, Glucklich comments "the reader may be forgiven for feeling a little bit lost." Wow, does that sentence capture the wrong-headed arrogance of the author. IT WAS HIS JOB TO AVOID LOSING THE READER. DUH. I have trouble forgiving a writer who's blaming me for not getting his point.

The professor gets annoying in another way as well. He keeps telling us what he is about to prove, or about to connect, but his next chapter "proofs" and "connections" are not stated in a style that persuades me. Somewhere around page 130, he quotes another writer as saying "The biggest challenge is the reader's boredom." Duh, again. Where was the editor, who should have jumped all over the author and told him "You are right. And you are guilty. This topic is about life, death, murder, and the hope of heaven. If you can't make that stuff fascinating, hire a ghost writer"? Page 134 was pretty well-done, but then we quickly sink back into the ancient history of religious rituals thousands of years ago in excruciating detail better suited to a doctoral thesis. I believe the author has great knowledge in his field, and good intentions, and may have a valid point about how to reduce the terrorism problem. He just isn't a compelling teller of the tale.
Shistus
This is a must-read for policy makers in the West. In the forever quest to down-play religion as a cause of problem in issues of global affairs, there is a tendency to ignore what animates most people on this earth...their faith in God. To over-simplify acts of terrorism (carried out in the name of God) as resultant due, only to socio-economic reasons or loss of cultural identity (in the post-colonial frame-work) will prove extremely tactless. However, more books have been written to either victimize or criminalize adherents of a faith who take up arms or lay down their lives in the name of God. This book provides an insight into the world of "heart" as that is where faith and God reside. And, in the name of faith or God, from the heart, emanates love for both acts, compassion and crime.
Goldendragon
I'm giving this book 5 stars because Dr. Ariel Glucklich's work is substantial and his book is trying to open a new door in our analysis of what's driving suicide bombers. There may be some confusion about the book itself, because the cover and title may lead readers to expect that it's 300 pages of case studies from bombers' lives.

That's not the case.

The bulk of this book is about the nature of the spiritual fuel itself, which takes us from the lives of saints to scriptures to lines of poetry to psychological analysis to the inner workings of religious ecstasy to suicide bombers eventually.

Dr. Glucklich is a highly respected scholar in religion, psychology and anthropology and one of his major areas of research involves the troubling forms of religious expression that are self destructive.

That may seem like a strange area of expertise--but it's actually extremely important. As a journalist for more than 30 years, I've covered stories around the world about disastrously destructive human behavior. Some years ago, for example, the world was stunned by the Japanese sect that released poison gas in subways. Later, when documentary films were released of the sect's followers, it was confounding to find these people still so kindly and simply trying to follow remaining spiritual practices of this deadly group--even after the founder was in prison. If you're curious, Amazon sells the documentaries: A

Our tendency is to react to suicide attacks, like this example in Japan, as evidence the attackers are crazy and their actions have nothing to do with "real" religion. Rather, Dr. Glucklich shows that their inner fuel, their point of departure from true religion into these tragically destructive ends, really is the same fuel that produces the great saints, for example.

This actually is good, constructive news, because--if his analysis proves to be true long term--then it can lead to interventions to prevent this wonderfully noble spiritual energy from jumping the tracks at some point and aiming itself at violent ends.

I strongly recommend the book and suggest small groups discuss its findings. Remember, though, mostly the book is an examination of this spiritual fuel down through history and various forms of religious expressions. It's fascinating and provocative. You'll have no shortage of discussion in your group.
Small Black
Dying for Heaven is more than meets the eyes. I was surprised to see that it is essentially an evolutionary theory of religion. But unlike books on religion and evolution it is not about genetics but behavior. It explains how religion recruits human loyalty to the group and even engenders acts of self-sacrifice to the group and it does so by manipulating pleasures. I found the argument startling and the writing fresh. The front image and the chapters on suicide bombers catch the eye but are not essential to this book.