» » Sex and the State: Abortion, Divorce, and the Family under Latin American Dictatorships and Democracies

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by Mala Htun
Download Sex and the State: Abortion, Divorce, and the Family under Latin American Dictatorships and Democracies fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Mala Htun
  • ISBN:
    0521810493
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521810494
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (April 7, 2003)
  • Pages:
    232 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1117 kb
  • ePUB format
    1822 kb
  • DJVU format
    1250 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    372
  • Formats:
    rtf lrf mobi doc


Sex and the State illuminates the ways in which policy innovation occurs, what shapes the terms of debate on the . After two decades of scholarship on the subject, this is simply the most important book yet to appear on gender and politics in Latin America.

Sex and the State illuminates the ways in which policy innovation occurs, what shapes the terms of debate on the age-old question of the separation of church and state, and why the influence of the Catholic Church on social policy looms larger at some times and in some places than others. Frances Hagopian, University of Notre Dame. Sex and the State demonstrates persuasively that gender-related issues cannot be lumped together simply because they pertain to women.

MALA HTUN This book shows that liberalizing reforms on gender and the family may come . toward illiberal democracy in the region (Diamond 1999; O’Donnell 1994; Zakaria 1997).

published by the press syndicate of the university of cambridge The Pitt Building, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, United Kingdom. This book shows that liberalizing reforms on gender and the family may come about in surprising ways. Between 1960 and 1990, conservative mili-tary governments in Latin America introduced liberalizing reforms to laws on gender and the family.

edu and the wider internet faster and more securely, please take a few seconds to upgrade your browser. Time for Change: Reproductive Rights in Latin America in the 21st Century. By Jane Marcus-Delgado. Abortion Law Reforms in Colombia and Nicaragua: Issue Networks and Opportunity Contexts. To Make All Children Equal is a Change in the Power Structures of Society : The Politics of Family Law in Twentieth-Century Chile and Latin America. List of Tables vii List of Abbreviations viii Acknowledgements xii Notes on the Contributors xiii.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2005, Stephanie Rousseau and others published Sex and the State: Abortion, Divorce, and .

DOI: 1. 307/41800281.

Bibliographic Citation. Related Items in Google Scholar. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Mala Htun's book on gender and public policymaking under democracy and dictatorship is an important scholarly contribution, filling many of the gaps in the literature on public policy and feminist activism in Latin America. Export citation Request permission. Recommend this journal.

Sex and the state in Latin America. Four normative traditions. Completing the agenda: family equality and democratic politics. Why hasn't abortion been liberalized in Latin America?

Sex and the state in Latin America. Reforming women's rights under military dictatorships. Church and state in the struggle for divorce. Why hasn't abortion been liberalized in Latin America? Table of Contents provided by Publisher.

Sex and the State book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Sex and the State: Abortion, Divorce, and the Family Under Latin American Dictatorships and Democracies.

Indeed, the opposite often occurs; Latin American democracies have, for example, uniformly failed to change old laws on abortion. This Htun attributes to the region's lack of a history of constitutional liberalism and the institutions that sustain it. Democracy, therefore, opens the door to both liberal and illiberal mobilization on gender policy (and, given the influence of the Catholic Church in countries without a strong civil society, the latter is often more likely).

As Argentina, Brazil, and Chile made transitions from democratic to authoritarian forms of government (and back), they confronted challenges posed by the rise of the feminist movement, social changes, and the power of the Catholic Church. This study explores the patterns of gender-related policy reform in these countries and reveals their implications for the peoples of Latin America. In addition, it offers a broader understanding of the logic behind the state's role in affecting private lives and gender relations everywhere.