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by Warren Zimmermann
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Warren Zimmermann
  • ISBN:
    0374528934
  • ISBN13:
    978-0374528935
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Farrar, Straus and Giroux; Reprint edition (January 15, 2004)
  • Pages:
    576 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1121 kb
  • ePUB format
    1353 kb
  • DJVU format
    1274 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    333
  • Formats:
    txt mbr lrf doc


is essential background for anyone interested in how the United States arrived at its present place in the world. a fascinating visit to an era that has received far too little attention. Richard Holbrooke, Foreign Affairs. Warren Zimmermann spent thirty-three years as an officer in the . Foreign Service, serving in France, Austria, Spain, Switzerland, Venezuela, the Soviet Union, and as our last ambassador to Yugoslavia.

Warren Zimmermann (November 16, 1934 – February 3, 2004) was an American career diplomat best . First Great Triumph: How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004).

Warren Zimmermann (November 16, 1934 – February 3, 2004) was an American career diplomat best known as the last US ambassador to SFR Yugoslavia before its disintegration in a series of civil wars. Zimmermann was a member of the Yale Class of 1956, and a member of Scroll and Key Society Contents.

First Great Triumph book. Zimmerman presents this as a single narrative that tells the story of "How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power" (the book's subtitle), but it's by no means that integrated. The first 200 pages or so are the interlocking biographies of the five men in question, imperialists all: Theodore Roosevelt; TR's Secretary of State, John Hay; his Secretary of War, Elihu Root; Massachusetts Senator Henry Cabot Took a while to get through this one, but that's OK; its style lends itself to that.

Ethics and International Affairs 17 (1):181-182 (2003). A Property Right to Medical Care.

Book Format: Choose an option

Book Format: Choose an option. He makes it clear why no discussion of America's international responsibilities today can be complete without understanding how the United States claimed its global powers a century ago. Specifications. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

By Warren Zimmermann. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2002 . The book addresses the emergence of imperialism as the leitmotif of US foreign policy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Zimmermann calls them the "fathers of modern American imperialism. He succeeds by combining biography with a rich synthesis of political, social, diplomatic, and military history.

Zimmermann not only discusses the emergence of the United States onto the world scene as a major player, but also interweaves five . Zimmerman's First Great Triumph is a welcome dissertation for many reasons.

Zimmermann not only discusses the emergence of the United States onto the world scene as a major player, but also interweaves five amazing men: John Hay, Alfred Thayer Mahan, Elihu Root, Henry Cabot Lodge, and Theodore. It is both an analysis of the history and aims of American foreign policy and a collection of biographical sketches.

How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power. The renowned diplomat and writer Warren Zimmermann seeks answers in the lives and relationships of five remarkable figures: the hyper-energetic Theodore Roosevelt, the ascetic naval strategist Alfred T. Mahan, the bigoted and wily Henry Cabot Lodge, the self-doubting moderate Secretary of State John Hay, and the hard-edged corporate lawyer turned colonial administrator Elihu Root.

How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power

How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power. by Warren Zimmermann. Indeed, he writes, imperialism was not very popular in 1898 either, so that two of the chief architects of America’s global expansion, Theodore Roosevelt and Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, resorted to euphemisms such as Americanism and large policy.

'AMERICANS like to pretend that they have no imperial past,'' Warren Zimmermann tells us in ''First Great Triumph: How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power.

"We were sure that we would win, that we should score the first great triumph in a mighty world-movement."--Theodore Roosevelt, 1904

Americans like to think they have no imperial past. In fact, the United States became an imperial nation within five short years a century ago (1898-1903), exploding onto the international scene with the conquest of Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, and (indirectly) Panama. How did the nation become a player in world politics so suddenly-and what inspired the move toward imperialism in the first place?

The renowned diplomat and writer Warren Zimmermann seeks answers in the lives and relationships of five remarkable figures: the hyper-energetic Theodore Roosevelt, the ascetic naval strategist Alfred T. Mahan, the bigoted and wily Henry Cabot Lodge, the self-doubting moderate Secretary of State John Hay, and the hard-edged corporate lawyer turned colonial administrator Elihu Root. Faced with difficult choices, these extraordinary men, all close friends, instituted new political and diplomatic policies with intermittent audacity, arrogance, generosity, paternalism, and vision.

Zimmermann's discerning account of these five men also examines the ways they exploited the readiness of the American people to support a surge of expansion overseas. He makes it clear why no discussion of America's international responsibilities today can be complete without understanding how the United States claimed its global powers a century ago.


Granijurus
This lengthy book is a detailed introduction to the history of U.S. foreign policy under the McKinley and Roosevelt administrations with particular attention to five major political figures (Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge, Elihu Hoot, John Hay and Alfred Thayer Mahan). The former diplomat Warren Zimmermann provides a clear and cogent picture of the backgrounds of the five people and how they shaped the rise of America as a global power. Unlike some academic publications, this work is free of esoteric jargons and concepts and is thus highly readable for all. However, some parts of the book are more descriptive than illustrative. Nevertheless, it is a good guide to the topic.
Dishadel
This book is an ambitious work which not only combines biography and history, but which depicts the biographies of 5 people intertwined in a sweeping and important period of American history. To the author's credit, he succeeds in weaving this all together in a highly coherent and insightful manner which does justice to and provides fair analysis on its subjects and historical period. This book is rooted in an extensive and rich bibliography, and the author's background as a diplomat provides keen perspective on the international relations of the period's events.

I would give this book 4.5 stars if I could, but I enjoyed it so much I round it up. There are some very minor flaws which, if corrected in a second edition, would result in self-contained perfection. First, there are a couple grammatical errors in the early chapters (ex, "a friend of Roosevelt's" should be "a friend of Roosevelt"), which the editor should have corrected. The second issue is the author, who succeeds in writing highly-cited analysis, makes flippant, uncited, and incorrect remarks about 19th century robber baron Jay Gould, who modern historians have shown to be no more evil and no more altruistic than any other baron from his era (again for the editor to catch). The third problem is, in the conclusion of the book, the author soils what is a timeless analysis on timeless subject matter with references to fleeting issues which took place at the time of his writing, around 2003, which, particularly in hindsight, pale in importance, influence and relevance to the grand themes and events he dedicates 500 pages to discussing.

This book is serious subject matter for a serious reader; it begins with the life stories of Theodore Roosevelt, Alfred Mahan, Elihu Root, Henry Cabot Lodge and John Hay before picking up momentum with a narrative of the context and events of 1898 and beyond. However, the care the author takes to be as brief and focused as possible comes across and is well done, and the 500 pages it takes to tell this story is a testament to the subject matter's ginormous scope. I highly recommend this work for an interested student of this period in American history.
Binthars
In First Great Triumph, author Warren Zimmermann demonstrates a masterful knowledge of the beginnings of American imperialism. He first develops biographical sketches into the background of the five men he feels made the most significant contributions to imperialist doctrines then uses the second part of the book to develop his theory. The result is a readable, engaging work that represents an important contribution to American diplomatic history.
But Zimmermann also uses his book as a partial mirror to the present day. In 1898, America badgered Spain into a war the Spanish could not win. The reader cannot help but notice strong parallels to the approach America is using towards Iraq in 2003. Zimmermann?s quote about how American?s see themselves as liberators but are seen as oppressors by those they conquer echoes of America?s relationship with Pakistan today. His final twenty or so pages carry the work in sketch form to the present and helps portray his interpretation of the situation of America as an imperialist power.
Zimmermann?s work is well crafted, but there are questions about who he includes and who he only give limited space. After their biographical chapters, John Hay and Elihu Root, and to a lesser extent Alfred Mahan, receive only limited attention. The main players are Henry Cabot Lodge and Theodore Roosevelt. William McKinley and Woodrow Wilson receive mention in the latter part, but are omitted in the first. More detailed chapters on them may have helped the transition that occurred in 1920 where overt imperialism was set aside in Harding's "Return to Normalcy" (whatever that means) campaign. Also there is no mention of Roosevelt as a progressive Republican that reached across class lines to achieve great popularity.
All things being equal, this is a very good book and Zimmermann has established himself as a powerful force in this time period. His title seems a bit unusual, as one may confuse it with something on the American Revolution or the Constitution, but it is a quote borrowed from Roosevelt on his way to Cuba with the Rough Riders.
SARAND
This is a great book about a little known and less studied period of American history---- the time between the Spanish American War and WW1. It also deals with some great American statesman who didn't become president. This was a time in history that America began to emerge as a legitimate world power. The building of the navy and development of modern Naval war tactics under Alfred Mahan is greatly discussed.In my study of American history three more names kept coming up regularly in this period: Henry Cabot Lodge, John Hay and Elihu Root. All three men had long distinguished careers in the senate and various cabinet postions and all three men were involved in decisions that lead America through the Spanish American War, dealing with the territories we acquired from that war and how America finally came to be the world power it was meant to be