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by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche,Adrian Collins
Download On the Use and Abuse of History for Life (Dodo Press) fb2
Philosophy
  • Author:
    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche,Adrian Collins
  • ISBN:
    1409941663
  • ISBN13:
    978-1409941668
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dodo Press (October 31, 2008)
  • Pages:
    76 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Philosophy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1270 kb
  • ePUB format
    1897 kb
  • DJVU format
    1689 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    401
  • Formats:
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With these words Friedrich Nietzsche He wrote many books, such as Basic Writings of Nietzsche,Thus Spoke Zarathustra,The Twilight of th. .

With these words Friedrich Nietzsche. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a German philosopher, cultural critic, poet and composer, most known for his statement, "God is dead. He suffered a mental collapse, and spent the last eleven years of his life in a psychiatric clinic. He wrote many books, such as Basic Writings of Nietzsche,Thus Spoke Zarathustra,The Twilight of the Idols and The Anti-Christ, the ed Will to Power, etc. As a young man, he even tried his hand at composition ].

Moreover I hate everything that merely instructs me without increasing or directly quickening my activity

Moreover I hate everything that merely instructs me without increasing or directly quickening my activity. These words of Goethe, like a sincere ceterum censeo may well stand at the head of my thoughts on the worth and the worthlessness of history

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a German philosopher.

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a German philosopher. His writing included critiques of religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, using a distinctive style and displaying a fondness for aphorism. Nietzschea?s influenc. Nietzschea?s influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism.

Book by Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. On the Usefulness and Disadvantage of History for Life

Book by Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. On the Usefulness and Disadvantage of History for Life. Between 1872, when his first book Die Geburt der Tragödie appeared, and 1876, when he left the University of Basel to write in Italy, Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) wrote an enormous amount of prose, most of which he did not bring to a satisfactory completion. However, he did publish, singly, a series of short books/pamphlets he called Unzeitgemässe Betrachtungen (Untimely Considerations), which at one point he had projected to include On the Usefulness and Disadvantage of History for Life.

The son of a Lutheran pastor, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was born in 1844 in Roecken, Prussia, and studied classical . In January 1889, Nietzsche suffered a sudden mental collapse; he lived the last 10 years of his life in a condition of insanity.

The son of a Lutheran pastor, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was born in 1844 in Roecken, Prussia, and studied classical philology at the Universities of Bonn and Leipzig. While at Leipzig he read the works of Schopenhauer, which greatly impressed him. He also became a disciple of the composer Richard Wagner. After his death, his sister published many of his papers under the title The Will to Power. Nietzsche was a radical questioner who often wrote polemically with deliberate obscurity, intending to perplex, shock, and offend his readers.

Nietzsche's longer paragraphs have been broken into shorter paragraphs. We wish to use history only insofar as it serves living. But there is a degree of doing history and a valuing of it through which life atrophies and degenerates

Nietzsche's longer paragraphs have been broken into shorter paragraphs. This text is in the public domain, released September 1998. This text was revised slightly and a counter added on April 23, 2000]. But there is a degree of doing history and a valuing of it through which life atrophies and degenerates. To bring this phenomenon to light as a remarkable symptom of our time is every bit as necessary as it may be painful. I have tried to describe a feeling which has often enough tormented me.

Similar books and articles On the Advantage and Disadvantage of History for Life. Friedrich Nietzsche - 1980 - Hackett Publishing Company. Added to PP index 2015-02-02

Similar books and articles. On Abuses in the Uses of History: Blumenberg on Nietzsche; Nietzsche on Genealogy. N. Widder - 2000 - History of Political Thought 21 (2):308-326. On the Use and Abuse of History for Life. Friedrich Nietzsche - unknown. Will Durant - 2010 - Simon & Schuster Paperbacks. History Out of Joint: Essays on the Use and Abuse of History. On the Advantage and Disadvantage of History for Life. Added to PP index 2015-02-02. Total views 0. Recent downloads (6 months) 0. How can I increase my downloads? Downloads.

When Nietzsche published this work in 1873, just two years following German reunification led by Otto Von Bismarck, he described himself as "out of touch with the times

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a German philosopher. His writing included critiques of religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, using a distinctive style and displaying a fondness for aphorism. Nietzscheâ?s influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism. He began his career as a philologist before turning to philosophy. At the age of 24 he became Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, but resigned in 1879 due to health problems, which would plague him for most of his life. In 1889 he exhibited symptoms of serious mental illness, living out his remaining years in the care of his mother and sister until his death in 1900. His works include From my Life (1858), On Music (1858), Napoleon III as a President (1862), Free Willand Fate (1862), My Life (1864), The Birth of Tragedy (1872), Richard Wagner in Bayreuth (1876), Human, All-Too-Human (1878), Beyond Good and Evil (1886), The Antichrist (1888) and Ecce Homo (1888).

Cala
[NOTE: this review is about the 73-page paperback translation by Adrian Collins.]

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a German philosopher, cultural critic, poet and composer, most known for his statement, "God is dead." He suffered a mental collapse, and spent the last eleven years of his life in a psychiatric clinic. He wrote many books, such as Basic Writings of Nietzsche,Thus Spoke Zarathustra,The Twilight of the Idols and The Anti-Christ, the posthumously-published Will to Power, etc. As a young man, he even tried his hand at composition ].

He wrote in the Preface of this 1874 essay, “These thoughts are ‘out of season,’ because I am trying to represent something of which the age is rightly proud---its historical culture---as a fault and a defect in our time, believing as I do that was are all suffering from a malignant historical fever and should at least recognize the fact... I must admit so much in virtue of my profession as a classical scholar; for I do not know what meaning classical scholarship may have for our time except in its being ‘unseasonable’---that is, contrary to our time, and yet with an influence on it for the benefit, it may be hoped, of a future time.” (Pg. 4)

He states, “Whoever asks his friends whether they would live the last ten or twenty years over again will easily see… they will all answer no… But that question … is capable of another; also a ‘no,’ but on different grounds. It is the ‘no’ of the ‘super-historical’ man who sees no salvation in evolution, for whom the world is complete and fulfills its aim in every single moment. How could the next ten years teach what the past ten were not able to teach?” (Pg. 10)

He suggests, “History regarded as pure knowledge and allowed to sway the intellect would mean for men the final balancing of the ledger of life. Historical study is only fruitful for the future is it follows a powerful life-giving influence, for example, a new system of culture---only, therefore, if it is guided and dominated by a higher force, and does not itself guide and dominate.” (Pg. 12)

He observes, “The opposition of INNER and OUTER makes the outer side still more barbarous, as it would naturally be when the outward growth of a rude people merely developed its primitive inner needs. For what means has nature of repressing too great a luxuriance from without? Only one---to be affected by it as little as possible, to set it aside and stamp it out at the first opportunity. And so we have the custom of no longer taking real things seriously, we get the feeble personality on which the real and the permanent make so little impression.” (Pg. 24)

He says, “History unsettles the feelings when they are not powerful enough to measure the past by themselves. The man who no longer dares trust himself, but asks history against his will for advice ‘how he ought to feel now,’ is insensibly turned by his timidity into a play-actor, and plays a part or, generally, many parts---very badly, therefore, and superficially. Gradually all connection ceases between the man and his historical subjects.” (Pg. 32)

He asserts, “The measurement of the opinions and deeds of the past by the universal opinions of the present is called ‘objectivity’ by these simple people. They find the canon of all truth here: their work is to adapt the past to the present triviality. And they call all historical writing ‘subjective’ that does not regard these popular opinions as canonical.” (Pg. 37)

He predicts, “The time will come when we shall wisely keep away from all constructions of the world-process, or even of the history of man---a time when we shall no more look at masses but at individuals who form a sort of bridge over the wan stream of becoming. They may not perhaps continue a process, but they live out of time, as contemporaries… The task of history is to be a mediator between these, and even to give the motive and power to produce the great man. The aim of mankind can lie ultimately only in its highest examples.” (Pg. 59)

This brief book---which was also published as part of Nietzsche’s “Untimely Meditations”---will be of keen interest to fans of Nietzsche.
Aradwyn
I wish that this long, weird, little-known essay could be read by every college freshman.

Here Nietzsche argues that the great people of history should be a source of inspiration for the present. It seems a simple, self-evident truth.

Then, why do so few people turn to the past for real-life guidance? Nietzsche says that one culprit is an approach to history that is sometimes called historicism, a notion which assumes that historical figures or events are unique unto themselves and to their own particular time, and, as a result, are not relevant in the far-different Now.

Underlying historicism is a perceived distinction between "being" and "becoming." The contemporary point of view often accepts outright -- without a second thought -- that humanity is not static. It is not "being," but evolving, becoming something new all the time. And so what worked and what was considered truth 100 or 1,000 years ago has no currency. In fact, there is no truth over time.

The other culprit is devotion to objectivity, unmasking the full, sometimes ugly, face of the past. (This is necessary, though Nietzsche might disagree.). But in unmasking the past, we should be sure to ask whether our failings negate the achievements. Thomas Jefferson presents an obvious example. Do his flaws mean that he has nothing to say to us now? And if he does have something to say, what is it? What should we copy? Bill Clinton presents a more recent case. Flaws and all, did he have something to offer?

What a heartfelt cry this was. Let history speak to us, Nietzsche says. We need it. In fact, he writes, "the aim of mankind can lie ultimately only in its highest examples."

Listen to the greats. Read about the greats. "Satisfy your souls on Plutarch," he says, "and dare to believe in yourselves when you believe in your heroes."

How arrogant our present selves can be. This essay reminds me of a quote from G.K. Chesterton: "Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead."

So, cheers to Lincoln, Churchill, the American Founders, the industrialists, the writers (the Solzenitzens of the world), the explorers, the preachers, the inventors, the thinkers, the doers and all the bold and righteous of the past who gave us their greatness.

I have heard that Nietzsche changed his mind about this essay. I don't know if that's true; but either way, his word has been out a long time. Let it rip.
Usishele
Why would they do that?