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by Paul THEROUX
Download Millroy the magician fb2
Philosophy
  • Author:
    Paul THEROUX
  • ISBN:
    0241131855
  • ISBN13:
    978-0241131855
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hamish Hamilton; 1st ed. edition (1993)
  • Pages:
    400 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Philosophy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1716 kb
  • ePUB format
    1796 kb
  • DJVU format
    1491 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    249
  • Formats:
    mbr lit txt docx


Paul Theroux was born in Medford, Massachusetts in 1941 and published his first novel, Waldo, in 1967. His subsequent novels include The Family Arsenal, Picture Palace, The Mosquito Coast, O-Zone, Millroy the Magician, My Secret History, My Other Life, and, most recently, A Dead Hand.

Paul Theroux was born in Medford, Massachusetts in 1941 and published his first novel, Waldo, in 1967. His highly acclaimed travel books include Riding the Iron Rooster, The Great Railway Bazaar, The Old Patagonian Express, Fresh-Air Fiend, Ghost Train to the Eastern Star and The Tao of Travel. He divides his time between Cape Cod and the Hawaiian Islands. Books by Paul Theroux.

Millroy the Magician is a novel by American writer Paul Theroux. It was published in 1993 by Hamish Hamilton in the UK and by Random House the following year in the US, where it was chosen as one of the New York Times notable books of the year

Millroy the Magician is a novel by American writer Paul Theroux. It was published in 1993 by Hamish Hamilton in the UK and by Random House the following year in the US, where it was chosen as one of the New York Times notable books of the year. The novel has been identified as one of the best of the 1990s. It is a satire of American consumer culture and love of fast food and contains elements of parable and magic realism.

For Millroy was no ordinary magician

For Millroy was no ordinary magician. funny, dark satire of America's obsessions

Millroy the Magician book. For Millroy Fourteen-year-old Jilly Farina was mesmerized by Millroy the Magician at the Barnstable County Fair

Millroy the Magician book. For Millroy Fourteen-year-old Jilly Farina was mesmerized by Millroy the Magician at the Barnstable County Fair. After all, he once turned a girl from the audience into a glass of milk and drank her. But when Jilly stepped into the wickerwork coffin during a performance, she had no idea he would transform her dreary life into something truly magical, and a touch bizarre. For Millroy was no ordinary magician. He could smell the future, and Jilly was going to be part of it.

Millroy The Magician has been added to your Cart. Paul Theroux was born in Medford, Massachusetts, in 1941, and published his first novel, Waldo, in 1967. He wrote his next three novels, Fong and the Indians, Girls at Play and Jungle Lovers, after a five-year stay in Africa. He subsequently taught at the University of Singapore, and during his three years there produced a collection of short stories, Sinning with Annie, and highly praised novel Saint Jack.

Fourteen-year-old Jilly Farina walks into the tent at the County Fair and finds her life transformed

Fourteen-year-old Jilly Farina walks into the tent at the County Fair and finds her life transformed. Fixing her with her hypnotic gaze, Millroy the Magician performs astonishing miracles. When she is later magicked into his trailer and Millroy promised to train her as his assistant, Jilly feels safe for the first time her her short life. But Millroy is more than a mere stage-show magician.

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Used availability for Paul Theroux's Millroy the Magician. April 1996 : USA Hardback.

Аудиокнига "Millroy the Magician", Paul Theroux. Читает Christopher Hurt. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы

Аудиокнига "Millroy the Magician", Paul Theroux. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Millroy the Magician is a novel by American writer Paul Theroux. Paul Edward Theroux is an American travel writer and novelist, whose best-known work is The Great Railway Bazaar (1975). He has published numerous works of fiction, some of which were adapted as feature films. He was awarded the 1981 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel The Mosquito Coast, which was adapted for the 1986 movie of the same name.


Weiehan
I love this book! It is very different from Paul's usual travel books but a great read! Great health advice too!
Mariwyn
The book is lively and very entertaining. The service in purchasing the book and delivery were exceptional. Great experience.
Binthars
I've enjoyed a number of Theroux's books,- Saint Jack, Half Moon Street, and My Other Life. This was slow going, ponderous and disjointed. After a couple of hundred pages, and a myriad sampling of the author's obsessions and nonsensical snippets of new age philosophy, I retired the book to the utilitarian life of a door stop.
Gadar
It's long, densely-written, and rather monotonous. Billed as a "funny, dark satire" on my paperback copy, it's really none of those things. Despite all this, "Millroy The Magician" makes for a surprising journey into what is possible, not necessarily in this world we live in but rather in the hands of a talented, focused writer shaping his own reality.

Jilly Farina is a 14-year-old girl whose dead mother was all the love she knew. Yet she's still a relative innocent, a teenager whose strongest expletive is "Jeekers!" She has plenty of opportunity to use that word when she goes to the fair and meets a magician named Millroy who immediately befriends her and makes her the centerpiece of an amazing trick. For a little while, she wonders how Millroy does it. Then she realizes: It's really magic. Millroy meanwhile decides to work his magic on improving America's diet, using the Bible as a kind of cookbook. But his heart belongs to Jilly, making her both proud and uneasy.

At some point, pushing through the first 100 pages or so, you either reject "Millroy" as a drecky sludge of author Paul Theroux's too-deep interest in matters not all that interesting to most of us, or accept it as a gem from the school of magic realism, a fairy tale grounded in earthly detail about two lonely people finding each other that dares to look a bit beyond "happily ever after." I bounced back and forth, fascinated, perplexed, but never exactly engaged. You get an assortment of wild plot twists, characters who come and go and tricky situations Millroy and his young friend find themselves in, but Theroux doesn't do much with them. When your protagonist is a magic man, there's not much to these things beyond saying "Abracadabra," so to speak.

The novel's strongest element is the central relationship between Millroy and Jilly. When the focus is on them, "Millroy" kept me reading. Some see the New Testament as a chief source of inspiration (or satire), and it's hard to miss echoes of "The Tempest" in the ending. Me, I kept thinking especially early on of the Dylan Thomas story "After The Fair," which presents a similarly unlikely friendship between girl and fairground attraction in a world that seems to jiggle between dream-state and reality. Jilly likes Millroy, and comes to feel protected, and yet she's uneasy about the guy, creating an effective undertow of constructive suspense.

"His magic made the world seem amazing, unfamiliar and a little frightening because there was always a hint of danger in it, as though he had reached down deeply and stuck his hand into another, darker world in order to produce these wonders," Theroux writes.

When Theroux introduces other elements into his novel, like Millroy's venture into television, his tangling with a bitter children's-show host and an unhinged evangelist, his launch of a chain of health-food diners, and his gathering a tribe of "Sons and Daughters" who have escaped from homes worse than Jilly's, the plot wanders less convincingly and failed to hold my attention.

Theroux does strike a nice balance in tone, getting across both Jilly's innocence and Millroy's outsized wonders in such a way I began to wonder if what I was reading wasn't supposed to be the wholly subjective take of Jilly as an unreliable narrator. But that interpretation doesn't hold water, especially when Millroy is walking on it, or even parting it like Moses as the story winds down in Hawaii.

I don't know what to make of the ending, which definitely takes chances with a reader's sensibilities if not their sense of who these characters are from 400 pages in their company. But Theroux takes such pains to bring you along on this singular journey, it's hard to quibble with the odd place it leaves you. "Millroy" is not a fun book, but it makes for a memorable experience.
I am hcv men
I got hooked on Theroux the year Mosquito Coast came out, and I've always enjoyed his insight into the human condition and his rich authorial voice. But something tells me he was way too invested in this novel, the first thing of his I've read that I probably won't finish.

It strikes me that he's making a try at writing a Steven King kind of novel. He flat doesn't pull it off, because he can't get enough distance from the point that he insists on making on every page. While I appreciate his position, reading the book turns into an exercise like unto listening to a symphony orchestra made up entirely of kettledrums.

Theroux falls prey to a rather interesting conceit, yet one not terribly uncommon among creative writers: He thinks he has a clever ear for consumer-item nomenclature, ad and tv jingles, and the like. He intersperses these throughout the text -- King sometimes does the same -- and tends to like mingling his made-up stuff in lists that include real-world things. So we get a list with, for example: Captain Kangaroo, the Mumbling Humptulips, the Flintstones, and the Frawlies. Y'know .. mumbling humptulips! How can ya not laugh? "Mumble" and "Hump" sound so funny together, hee hee hee! And "hump tulips" -- giggle! (No, thud.) Meanwhile, "Paradise Park" was the name of a real tourist destination (not a tv show). In Hawaii. Where he lives half the year. You can tell he didn't invent it, because it has an authentic ring.

I'll be a little more selective with his novels from now on. This one's too, well, plugged up with monomania.
Jark
I have read nearly all of Paul Theroux's novels and travel books and I'm getting down to the last couple. If this is your first Theroux...don't go by this.

I'd started reading MILLROY THE MAGICIAN several times since it was published but just couldn't get into it. Since there are only a couple left, I had no choice but to tackle it again.

And I didn't like it. At first, I thought it was too close to THE MOSQUITO COAST with Millroy as an even-more bizarre incarnation of Allie Fox with Jilly as another teen narrator in his shadow. The jabs at religion are constant and, as it turns out, distracting. The descriptions of Millroy cooking read like they take up 100 pages. His disgust at observing how and what Americans eat takes up another 100 pages. Repititious was a word that I kept thinking over and over.

With every one of Theroux's works I could always get something out of it. An intriguing character, an exotic and authentic location, an interesting storyline.

Not with MILLROY THE MAGICIAN. Couldn't believe a word of it. Except for Theroux's contempt for American culture. And who doesn't have that?