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by Professor Pascal Engel
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Philosophy
  • Author:
    Professor Pascal Engel
  • ISBN:
    1902683587
  • ISBN13:
    978-1902683584
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    McGill-Queen's University Press (May 1, 2007)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Philosophy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1569 kb
  • ePUB format
    1504 kb
  • DJVU format
    1446 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    377
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Engel's Truth is an example of philosophy at its very best, being enjoyable and useful. It has these significant strengths: Critically covers the major approaches to truth. Points out problems and consequences of each

Engel's Truth is an example of philosophy at its very best, being enjoyable and useful. Points out problems and consequences of each. Contains a five page section on mathematical truth, an important topic that is often slighted in other texts. There are also treatments of scientific and ethical truth, of similar length.

Pascal Engel is Professor of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy at the University of Geneva. Alternative conceptions of realism is a major theme of the entire book

Pascal Engel is Professor of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy at the University of Geneva. Engel's Truth is an example of philosophy at its very best, being enjoyable and useful. Alternative conceptions of realism is a major theme of the entire book. It picks up speed in Chapter 3 on minimal realism, and is the central topic of Chapter 4. This discussion reveals the subtlety of the realism concept, showing its close connections with the truth concept. Connections between truth and knowledge are also covered, but not to as great an extent.

Central Problems of Philosophy. By (author) Professor Pascal Engel. Engel argues that, although the minimalist conception of truth is basically right, it does not follow that truth can be eliminated from our philosophical thinking, as is claimed by some radical deflationists. In particular, he shows that some deflationist views have a definitively relativist and "postmodernist" ring and should be rejected.

Items related to Truth (Central Problems of Philosophy) "Pascal Engel, who teaches at the Sorbonne, is one of the leading figures i. .

Items related to Truth (Central Problems of Philosophy). Engel, Pascal Truth (Central Problems of Philosophy). ISBN 13: 9781902683584. Pascal Engel is Professor of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy at the University of Geneva.

This book begins with a presentation of the classical conceptions of truth - the correspondence theory, the .

In this critical introduction to contemporary philosophical issues in the theory of truth Pascal Engel provides clear and authoritative exposition of recent and current ideas while providing original perspectives that advances discussion of the key issues.

Professor Blackburn’s lecture has been an excellent onset of our conference Drawing primarily from Schelling's Erlangen lecture, The Nature of Philosophy as a Science, I explain how Schelling challenges such idealism, arguing for a living philosophical.

Professor Blackburn’s lecture has been an excellent onset of our conference. Now we will focus on truth in a contribution by Emanuele Severino followed by contributions from panellists. I would like to give the floor to Professor Emanuele Severino, professor at the University of Venice and San Raffaele University of Milan. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. Drawing primarily from Schelling's Erlangen lecture, The Nature of Philosophy as a Science, I explain how Schelling challenges such idealism, arguing for a living philosophical system whose principle is not reason or abstract thought but an ecstatic mode of being-in-the-world.

Start by marking Truth (Central Problems of Philosophy) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Truth is one of the central subjects in philosophy

Truth is one of the central subjects in philosophy. It is also one of the largest. Truth has been a topic of discussion in its own right for thousands of years. Moreover, a huge variety of issues in philosophy relate to truth, either by relying on theses about truth, or implying theses about truth. There are a number of book-length surveys of the topics discussed here, including Burgess and Burgess (2011), Kirkham (1992), and Künne (2003). Also, a number of the topics discussed here, and many further ones, are surveyed at more length in papers in Glanzberg (2018).

Pascal Engel offers this concise presentation and discussion of contemporary philosophical issues in the theory of truth. After a brief presentation of the classical conceptions of truth (correspondentist, coherentist, verificationist and pragmatist) the study focuses upon the debate between those who favour substantive conceptions of this classical kind and those who advocate so-called minimalist and deflationist conceptions, and who deny that truth can be any more than a thin concept, carrying no metaphysical weight. The author argues that, although the minimalist conception of truth is basically right, it does not follow that truth can be eliminated from our philosophical thinking, as it is claimed by some upholders of radical deflationist views. It is argued, in particular, that some deflationist views have a definitely relativist and postmodernist ring and should be rejected. Even if a metaphysical substantive theory of truth has little chance to succeed, the author argues, truth can keep a central role within our thinking, as a norm or guiding value of our rational inquiries and practices, in the philosophy of knowledge and in ethics.

Nothing personal
Engel's Truth is an example of philosophy at its very best, being enjoyable and useful. It has these significant strengths:

* Critically covers the major approaches to truth. Points out problems and consequences of each.

* Contains a five page section on mathematical truth, an important topic that is often slighted in other texts. There are also treatments of scientific and ethical truth, of similar length.

* Discusses the pendulum motion between realism and anti-realism, exposing the tensions within theories.

* Explains the normative role of truth. This is a signature theme of Engel, and a key reason for avoiding less ambitious truth interpretations.

* Truth is well organized and is always on point. The writing is clear; it has a concise yet flowing quality that covers a lot of ground in 150 pages.

* Engel is a minimal realist about truth, a position he reached as a compromise between the unacceptable poles of deflationism and problematic, substantive theories. I like to hear authors express their considered opinions rather than leave you guessing what conclusions they have reached.

* A fascinating, core part of the book is the realist/anti-realist debate. Alternative conceptions of realism is a major theme of the entire book. It picks up speed in Chapter 3 on minimal realism, and is the central topic of Chapter 4. This discussion reveals the subtlety of the realism concept, showing its close connections with the truth concept. Connections between truth and knowledge are also covered, but not to as great an extent.

Make no mistake, this is not "Truth for Dummies". Many of the sections require careful reading and back references. Any previous reading or thought you have done on the subject will be helpful. I greatly benefited from this short book, and recommend it as an introduction to truth for mature readers. Of course, tastes and backgrounds vary widely, and you may not be as engaged as I was. Still it's worth a look.
Andromathris
A hard read for a non academic without at least and undergrad in Math, Philosophy or another analytical discipline. None the less, I recommend it to all my crank philosopher friends to work through it. It is the real stuff and it cuts to the central problems in philosophy.
Bladecliff
superb text and service