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by Chris Turner,Jean Baudrillard
Download The Spirit of Terrorism, New Revised Edition fb2
Philosophy
  • Author:
    Chris Turner,Jean Baudrillard
  • ISBN:
    1859844480
  • ISBN13:
    978-1859844489
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Verso; New Edition edition (October 2003)
  • Pages:
    120 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Philosophy
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  • Rating:
    4.2
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    465
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Baudrillard sees the power of the terrorists as lying in the symbolism of slaughter – not merely the reality of death, but in a. .

Baudrillard sees the power of the terrorists as lying in the symbolism of slaughter – not merely the reality of death, but in a sacrifice that challenges the whole system. Where previously the old revolutionary sought to conduct a struggle between real forces in the context of ideology and politics, the new terrorist mounts a powerful symbolic challenge which, when combined with high-tech resources, constitutes an unprecedented assault on an over-sophisticated and vulnerable West.

Jean Baudrillard (1929–2007) began teaching sociology at the Université de.One person found this helpful.

Jean Baudrillard (1929–2007) began teaching sociology at the Université de Paris-X in 1966. He retired from academia in 1987 to write books and travel until his death in 2007. The New Terrorism is more a response to creeping world globalism than it is against one political system. He debunks the rhetoric of Clash of Cultures with this new terrorism, and discounts the significance of Islam in this movement. Inasmuch as globalism is the real target, the new terrorists could have been from another region or religion.

Jean Baudrillard, Chris Turner (Translator). Baudrillard sees the power of the terrorists as lying in the symbolism of slaughter - not merely the reality of death, but in a sacrifice that challenges the whole system. Published October 17th 2003 by Verso (first published November 3rd 2001).

by. Jean Baudrillard.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. Radical Thinkers series.

The Spirit of Terrorism (Paperback). Jean Baudrillard (author), Chris Turner (translator). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

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Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Jean Baudrillard, Chris Turner. 7 Mb. The Politics of Jean-Francois Lyotard: Justice and Political Theory. Chris Rojek, Mr Bryan S Turner, Bryan Turner. Category: Philosophy.

In this remarkable book Jean s leading theorist of that the .

In this remarkable book Jean s leading theorist of that the notion of the end is part of the fantasy of a linear history. Today we are not approaching the end of history but moving into reverse, into a process of systematic obliteration. Baudrillard explores the fatal strategies of time which shape our ways of thinking about history and its imaginary end. Ranging from the revolutions in Eastern Europe to the Gulf War, from the transformation of nature to the hyper-reality of the media, this postmodern mediation on modernity and its aftermath will be widely read.

ISBN 13: 9781859844489. Jean Baudrillard (1929–2007) began teaching sociology at the Université de Paris-X in 1966.

Translated by. Chris Turner. Translated by.

It is a series of assertions, inspired by his travels in America, in which Baudrillard strains his hardest to be clever and provocative. Download the new Indpendent Premium app. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines. It's crammed with paradoxes (America is "the only remaining primitive society") ; outlandish metaphors ("The marathon is a form of demonstrative suicide") and patronising generalisations ("America is a desert"; Americans are "brutally naïve").

Baudrillard sees the power of the terrorists as lying in the symbolism of slaughter – not merely the reality of death, but in a sacrifice that challenges the whole system. Where previously the old revolutionary sought to conduct a struggle between real forces in the context of ideology and politics, the new terrorist mounts a powerful symbolic challenge which, when combined with high-tech resources, constitutes an unprecedented assault on an over-sophisticated and vulnerable West. This new edition is up-dated with the essays ‘Hypotheses on Terrorism’ and ‘Violence of the Global’.

Jonide
Baudrillard speaks both as a Westerner, yet outside of the discourse most Americans would be familiar with (Good vs Evil, Us vs Them, Democracy vs Fundamentalism, Christians vs Muslims, "they hate us because we are free", etc). For those who only know these views, his ideas may come as a shock; for those who wish to think freely (outside what others say we must think), his ideas are a breath of fresh air. The style of the book is accessible for those unfamiliar with Baudrillardian ideas/concepts, and in fact could a good into to his concept of "simulation". A great read!
Zugar
The violence of the real, or the reality of violence is the only thing power understands. Confronted with suicides, the system (indeed any system) begins to mimic suicide, ultimately committing itself to its own suicide.
I won't pretend to understand all of this great writer's words. Partly because my understanding of French is limited. Partly because I have only read a translation. And lastly because I have been fed oh so many Americanisms.
This is a good intro into exploring possible interpretations and misunderstandings embedded in our conceptions of the "World". Reading it has helped me to begin to demystify the political concept of Terrorism, especially its connotations within the virtual world of media discourse.
"To the point that the idea of freedom, a new and recent idea, is already fading from minds and mores, and liberal globalization is coming about in precisely the opposite form-a police state globalization, a total control, a terror based on 'law and order' measures. Deregulation ends up in a maximum of constraints and restrictions, akin to those of a fundamentalist society." (p.32 from the unrevised edition)
I would also recommend "The Transparency of Evil: Essays on Extreme Phenomenon" (1993) by Jean Baudrillard.
Daizil
In spite of my usual reservations about Baudrillard; the bitchy nihilism, the occasional whiny sense of futility, the smug dismissal of almost any perspective that isn't simply his, etc., I found these essays to be very sharp and still quite relevant to our current situation.

His conception of the relationship between terrorism and global power (i.e. the U.S.) is less dependent on a specific historical or religious or political reading than most leftist considerations, which makes it both suspect and also much more interesting, and frankly, harder to ignore. Aside from the irritating turns of phrase which tend to accompany most critical theory (many of which Baudrillard is famous for using in his own writing), his observations here are for the most part quite concrete, and show how completely confused and utterly ridiculous a lot of our conventional thinking is about terror in our age.

(I tried to come up with some witty, post-modern version of 'jet fuel can't melt steal beams for this review, but I failed. Sorry)
Tetaian
In "The Spirit of Terrorism," Jean Baudrillard attempts to define the source not only of the rage of the terrorists who commandeered four jetliners to crash into the Twin Towers and the Pentagon but also the reaction of the West who suffered death and destruction in real time. Although Baudrillard does not come right out to say that he supports the terrorists' claims that America deserved to be attacked, the totality of his rhetoric clearly suggests a sympathetic stance towards those who seek harm to the United States. He equates the destruction of the Twin Towers as a deeply rooted desire of Capitalist America to "suiciding spectacularly." The "violence brewing around the world" would find a natural outlet on 9/11. Baudrillard likes to play armchair psychologist with frequent mention of America's death wish: "It is almost they who did it, but we who wanted it." He sees "complicity" between this death wish of America and a corresponding wish by terrorists to supply the fruition of that wish.

Power as concentrated in the hands of any nation-state must, according to Baudrillard, inevitably lead to its misuse by its brokers and a reactionary response by those who experience an "exacerbating will to destroy" that power. Thus, power "is complicit with its own destruction." As the Twin Towers collapsed, their duo fall resulted from America's hubristic self-vision as God-like which in turn Baudrillard terms America as "declaring war on itself." The uniqueness of the events of 9/11 he further sees as a "game to complete the event."

Baudrillard tries mightily to excuse Islamic religious fervor and ideology as the root cause of 9/11: "No ideology, no cause, not even an Islamic cause, can account for the energy which feeds terror." Further, he notes that Islam "is conversely not the embodiment of terror." Finally his defense of Islam is "if Islam dominated the world, terrorism would fight against it." Where then can an unbiased observer rationally account for the willingness and eagerness of those who wish to kill uncounted numbers of innocent men, women, and children merely to provide an outlet for ideological rage? The answer lies in what he sees as the symbolic nature of violence: "Violence in itself can be perfectly banal and innocuous." It is the symbolic reversal of the traditional unwillingness of killers to die to prove a point. The terrorists of 9/11 engaged in an orgy of this symbolic reversal of violence, an act which he calls "the true victory of terrorism." Yet, nowhere in this brief essay does Baudrillard touch upon the years of brainwashing and mind control needed to bring about this reversal. Nor does Baudrillard hint at other less noble, less self-sacrificing reasons that might have accounted for the attack on the Towers and the Pentagon. In essence, Baudrillard invites the reader to focus his view on the instant the planes crashed into their targets crammed with unsuspecting human beings. Such readers are invited to view the collapse of the Twin Towers as he does: a symbolic and unique event that must be viewed in the context of rage by the poor against the rich. Such a limiting view is of course a familiar one: blame the victim and excuse the perpetrator.