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by Paul Strathern
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Philosophy
  • Author:
    Paul Strathern
  • ISBN:
    1566632641
  • ISBN13:
    978-1566632645
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ivan R. Dee; First Edition edition (November 8, 1999)
  • Pages:
    91 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Philosophy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1234 kb
  • ePUB format
    1725 kb
  • DJVU format
    1469 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    744
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf lrf azw


Wittgenstein in 90 Minutes (Philosophers in 90 Minutes Series). This book, as well as the entire series, is light in terms philosophical exposition but highly readable and makes a good introduction as well as a good source for historical context and personal stories.

Wittgenstein in 90 Minutes (Philosophers in 90 Minutes Series). Dewey in 90 Minutes (Philosophers in 90 Minutes Series).

Berkeley in 90 Minutes (Philsophers in 90 Minutes). This book, as well as the entire series, is light in terms philosophical exposition but highly readable and makes a good introduction as well as a good source for historical context and personal stories

Berkeley in 90 Minutes (Philsophers in 90 Minutes). Rousseau In 90 Minutes (Philosophers in 90 Minutes (Audio)). Spinoza in 90 Minutes (Philosophers in 90 Minutes Series).

The Philosophy in 90 Minutes series, written by Paul Strathern, is a series of short introductory biographical overviews on well-known philosophers, set in brief historical context, along with brief impressions of their philosophies

The Philosophy in 90 Minutes series, written by Paul Strathern, is a series of short introductory biographical overviews on well-known philosophers, set in brief historical context, along with brief impressions of their philosophies. The books are also produced in audio format; read by narrator Robert Whitfield. The series’ intent is to "write about the philosophers' lives, adding in a few of their ideas".

This book is a delightful addition to Paul Strathern's Philosophers in 90 Minute series. Though the title might seem a trifle flippant, don't underestimate this short but potent book. Strathern himself is a truly remarkable individual, a polymath, widely travelled, with award winning fictional and non-fictional books. He approaches philosophy with a perspective far broader and (to me) more interesting than can anyone whose home base is limited to philosophy alone. In a two part approach that mirrors other books in the 90 Minute series, Strathern presents a sparkling biography of Aristotle, including his family life, his rise to fame, and his near brush with execution late in life.

I like Strathern's books very much, but it seems to me here he chose a subject not especially amenable to this kind of treatment.

What would Kierkegaard have thought about this book? He would have perhaps appreciated Stathern's humor, his narrative skill, his quickness of mind, his emphasizing Kierkegaard's thought as directed not to abstraction but to 'lived life. But he probably would have resented the effort to reduce the complexities of his thought, their contradictions and dialectical intricacies to easily digestible form. I like Strathern's books very much, but it seems to me here he chose a subject not especially amenable to this kind of treatment. Скачать (pdf, 2. 4 Mb) Читать.

Schopenhauer in 90 Minutes book. Like most entries in the Philosophers in 90 Minutes series by Paul Strathern, this is a very good introduction to one of western philosophy's greatest thinkers.

series The Philosophers in 90 Minutes Series

Narrated by Simon Vance. series The Philosophers in 90 Minutes Series. You have this audiobook.

Paul Strathern is author of the popular and critically acclaimed Philosophers in 90 Minutes series. Mr. Strathern has lectured in philosophy and mathematics and now lives and writes in London. Highlights from the series include Nietzsche in 90 Minutes, Aristotle in 90 Minutes, and Plato in 90 Minutes. A former Somerset Maugham prize winner, he is also the author of books on history and travel as well as five novels. His articles have appeared in a great many newspapers, including the Observer (London) and the Irish Times. His own degree in philosophy came from Trinity College, Dublin.

In 90 Minutes Series overview. By L Mark Higgins on 08-01-12. Strathern's books don't have the analytical depth found in Will Durant's "The Story of Philosophy" books, but he does a good job summarizing each philosopher's biography, major philosophical points, and criticisms. Additionally, Strathern's breadth is broader than Durant's in that he covers a greater number of philosophers

“Each of these little books is witty and dramatic and creates a sense of time, place, and character....I cannot think of a better way to introduce oneself and one's friends to Western civilization.”―Katherine A. Powers, Boston Globe. “Well-written, clear and informed, they have a breezy wit about them....I find them hard to stop reading.”―Richard Bernstein, New York Times. “Witty, illuminating, and blessedly concise.”―Jim Holt, Wall Street Journal. These brief and enlightening explorations of our greatest thinkers bring their ideas to life in entertaining and accessible fashion. Philosophical thought is deciphered and made comprehensive and interesting to almost everyone. Far from being a novelty, each book is a highly refined appraisal of the philosopher and his work, authoritative and clearly presented.

Coiwield
Highly readable and very approachable, true of each volume in this series.

This book, as well as the entire series, is light in terms philosophical exposition but highly readable and makes a good introduction as well as a good source for historical context and personal stories.

In being so thin a volume, which is at once the greatest virtue and greatest vice of this book, there is not much to review or there is simply too much be said about what is not said. I have thus presented one key take away from the book in the title to this review: Our very own existence is in itself the source of suffering to us.
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
Known as the philosopher of pessimism, Schopenhauer's philosophy reflected his personality. And personally, he thought the world was a bad joke, one that was indifferent to our fate. Later, Darwin's earth-shaking Theory of Evolution, would prove him to be right on this point.

Arthur Schopenhauer grew up mostly in Hamburg Germany, a member of the upper class. His father brow beat him into becoming a businessman and then committed suicide -- as mental illness ran in the family. However, Schopenhauer, despite his rank pessimism, was supremely sane.

Eventually managing to kick his father's ghost, he broke with his mother, and enrolled in the University of Gottingen as a medical student, but then soon began attending lectures in philosophy. Although Hegel was the philosophical rage of the day, Arthur, like everyone else too could not understand him. So, he took classes from Kant instead, and fell in love with his philosophy. He wrote his PhD thesis during the War of 1812 where he got to know, and spend hours talking to and helping Goethe with his "Theory of Colors."

Also, for the first time he discovered Indian philosophy, which helped to re-kindled the dark attitudes about the world that already lay deep within him. Schopenhauer wrote his magnum opus "The World as Will and Representation" in Dresden. He began it by seeing the world as a puzzle in search of a solution that only the truth could resolve. But what he discovered, and the way he viewed the world, seemed to undermine, rather than reinforce this search for the truth.

To Schopenhauer, there was no redeeming value to the world: It was evil and contingent, and God was not good. His worldview is that the world consists only of representations, mere phenomena, a Potemkin facade. But what supports this facade is not "the thing itself" (noumena) but a blind, impersonal "universal will," one that exists without cause and that lies beyond space and time.

Since the Will feeds on the trappings of individuality and ego, its selfishness and greed is what brings about all the misery and suffering in the world. Thus, in order to liberate ourselves from our egos, we must give up the idea of individuality and become selfless beings, admirers of art and aesthetics -- things that involve will-less contemplation.

In an earlier work called "The fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason," Schopenhauer argued that it is our perceptions that create the world. And they do so according to four types of cause and effect: logical, physical mathematical and moral. Together they conform to "the principle of sufficient reason," an idea, stolen from Leibniz and improved upon by Schopenhauer that means that "everything has a reason for existing, as it is, and not otherwise."

All these causes and effects belong to the phenomenal world, not to the world of "the thing in itself," or noumenal world. The latter, which is replaced by the Will, does not take part in cause and effect. Causation can only apply to phenomena in the world of experience and the will does not act as its causative agent. We gain access to, and are participating in the universal Will, only through introspection; that is to say, only when we are aware of ourselves from within.

And although we can be aware of our actions on two levels: act and Will, as operating in the "cause and effect world," or as our intuition, operating within the "realm of personal awareness." Yet, even though it is difficult to separate them, intuiting the Will does not cause our actions but underlies them. Put simply, as if anticipating Carl Jung, Schopenhauer viewed the Will as a universal force -- as a kind of collective consciousness, as it were, one that irradiates all phenomena.

Darwin's discovery in 1859 proved to be an intellectual "game changer." Everything seemed to fall before its universal dictates except Schopenhauer's philosophy. Schopenhauer simply reformulated his idea of a "universal Will" as Darwin's own "universal will to survive." And thus, it became a part of Darwin's misunderstood continuation as "the universal will to survive as the fittest." Although serious analysis was to demonstrate later that these ideas were little more than solipsism, during his lifetime, they were seen simply as deepening and further refining Schopenhauer's ideas.

But as would later be discovered, Schopenhauer's reformulation was perhaps too clever by half and looked at more seriously (as noted above) reduced to solipsism. For to know the will by introspection makes one's knowledge rest on a solitary basis: This kind of reasoning reduces to the well-known philosophical cul-de-sac of "I alone exists."

The problem was that Schopenhauer needed Freud -- except that he was about half a century too early. In his "intuition precedes analysis" formulation, he sorely needed Freud's unconscious mechanisms, which his ideas foreshadowed. But all he really had during the time of his existence was poetic and not philosophical ways to express his ideas. Still Schopenhauer will be remembered for being prescient as well as for being pessimistic. Three stars
Manemanu
Schopenhauer was explained very well in these tapes. By the way, the Giants of Philosophy was narrated by Charlton Heston and he did a great job with this series. His presentations were a lot more interesting then most of my philosophy professors and my professors were, on the whole, great! By the way, Schopenhauer was a lot bigger deal then some people think as he influenced Nietzsche, Freud, Einstein, and a whole slew of other high power propeller heads.
Bremar
Great!
6snake6
I started reading this book with skepticism. I mean, how could anyone condense the core of Schopenhauers's life's work into a 90 minute (75 actually) read? I mean the _World as Will and Representation_ alone is a mammoth four volumes. And yet Strathern did it.... I don't know if he succeeded with the other volumes of this series, but by god, he did it with Schopenhauer- and managed to throw in all sorts of interesting, insightful tid-bits of his personal life (as well as placing it in the overall context of western philosophy.)
For those unfamiliar with Schopenhauer's core ideas they are just this: will is the cause of all things in the universe. Will is the thing-in-itself. There is blind will in "inanimate" matter and intelligent will in Man. In fact, in man is the will supreme. All nature is an expression of will- and man is a pattern of the universe, greatly reduced. Yet, will to be, will to create, is the cause of all evil and suffering and is therefore to be denied, if not extinguished. In this way, Schopenhauer always reminded me of a "cold-enlightened" Buddhist of the Theravadan school. However, Schopenhauer did hold that we would be reabsorbed into the great universal will at death- stripped of lesser animal consciousness.
By the way, it should be noted that this is all very different from Nietzsche's Will to Power- Nietzsche essentially turned Schopenhauer's idea of will on its head- and then went insane.
Oh, by the way, I do not agree with the author that Schopenhauer was a nasty piece of work. He was simply, totally, an original- this creates friction. He was also a completely confident authority that trusted his own intellect and intuition at all times- instead of diluting his ideas will appeals to authority and footnotes. He was also correct that Hegel was a fraud- and that Kant was pure genius.