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by Julian Baggini
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Philosophy
  • Author:
    Julian Baggini
  • ISBN:
    1846680638
  • ISBN13:
    978-1846680632
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Profile Books Ltd; Main edition (July 8, 2010)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Philosophy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1851 kb
  • ePUB format
    1166 kb
  • DJVU format
    1743 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    580
  • Formats:
    doc lrf txt mobi


But Julian Baggini's short entry - very short: it is done and dusted in 130 pages - is neither focussed or organised enough to pull that off. It reads more like a loosely-themed ramble through a field of the author's favourite hobby horses.

But Julian Baggini's short entry - very short: it is done and dusted in 130 pages - is neither focussed or organised enough to pull that off.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Complaint: From Minor . Julian Baggini is a British philosopher and writer.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Complaint: From Minor Moans to Principled Protests (Big Ideas). Similar books to Complaint: From Minor Moans to Principled Protests (Big Ideas). Kindle (5th Generation). He has written for The Guardian, The Independent and many other publications, and is a regular guest on BBC Radio 4.

Complaint can be a powerful political tool In a short work that's part of Profile Books' "Big Ideas" series, Baggini (Atheism: A Very Short Introduction) examines a common.

Complaint can be a powerful political tool. Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King both used it to drive social change. In a short work that's part of Profile Books' "Big Ideas" series, Baggini (Atheism: A Very Short Introduction) examines a common occurrence in our daily lives: complaining. Often, our complaints are.

As Julian Baggini points out in his short and lucid book devoted to an important but neglected subject . Baggini is anxious in his book to distinguish between rightful and wrongful complaint and to provide a typology of the latter

As Julian Baggini points out in his short and lucid book devoted to an important but neglected subject, the philosophy of complaint, the propensity to complain represents a distinguishing feature of our species. The inevitable gulf between things as they are and as they ought to be is what gives rise to complaint. Baggini is anxious in his book to distinguish between rightful and wrongful complaint and to provide a typology of the latter. He starts by extolling complaint as the motor of social progress and moral advance. Start by marking Complaint: From Minor Moans to Principled Protests as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Even better a bit thought provoking in I like the idea that those who make the most noise be the ones who deserve to be listened to, on the basis the lesser noise makes may care less about an issue. Oct 19, 2014 R rated it liked it.

If you answer yes, then the promise is that a big cheque could be yours. This trend is much lamented. Robert Hughes’s Culture of Complaint was one of the first serious attempts to critique the book’s eponymous phenomenon. 24 That every page contained some kind of complaint by the author was ironic but not damning: right complaint should drive out wrong complaint. Ever since, people have been queuing up to complain about the complainers. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

ISBN 13: 9781847652782. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Read "Complaint From Minor Moans to Principled Protests" by Julian Baggini . From Minor Moans to Principled Protests. Remove from Wishlist. Expand/Collapse Synopsis. Complaint can be a powerful political tool.

British philosopher Julian Baggini returns to our show for a second time, joining us today to talk about his new . The book carries the sub-title 'From Minor Moans to Principled Protests', and runs the full gamut of objections.

British philosopher Julian Baggini returns to our show for a second time, joining us today to talk about his new book, 'Complaint'. From trivial grumbles about bad weather and public transport to the paradigm-shifting political protests of Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King, Baggini gives philosophical answers to why we complain and how each case is perceived.

Author : Julian Baggini. So why do we moan about increasingly trivial things - like the weather or public transport?

Author : Julian Baggini. Publisher : Profile Books Ltd. Book Price. So why do we moan about increasingly trivial things - like the weather or public transport? Do Brits complain less than Americans? Do men and women complain about different things? What is the best way to complain? From Adam and Eve to the Iraq War, Baggini analyzes precisely what we complain about, how and why. You can't complain about that!"

Complaint can be a powerful political tool. Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King both used it to drive social change. So why do we moan about increasingly trivial things - like the weather or public transport? Do Brits complain less than Americans? Do men and women complain about different things? What is the best way to complain? From Adam and Eve to the Iraq War, Baggini analyzes precisely what we complain about, how and why. You can't complain about that!

Questanthr
This was a very interesting book. Very well thought out. I would recommend it to everyone, particularly chronic , persistent, complainers.
Little Devil
If the reader can prepare herself to ignore a section about two-thirds of the way through the book that deals extensively and somewhat inexplicable with material drawn from a survey on complaining (effectively making this 100-page essay rather than 130-page book), what remains is terrific. Top-notch thinking and expression of thought, concentrated especially on a very strong opening and remarkable close. The last real chapter, covering the relationship between (among other things) freedom and responsibility is a model of sharp, challenging ideas that I found particularly relevant when hearing on the news that some people were seeking ways of suing--someone--in the wake of the Iceland volcano's ash plume. One could wish that every citizen in a secular, liberal democracy could read those ten or so pages and set their words on his heart. Complaint is human; petty complaint is common; but right complaint is noble and empowering, and it's not too much to think that careful readers of "Complaint" might be on a path to whining less and accomplishing more.
Lynnak
I found this book both entertaining and imformative. It was interesting to me that more people complain about things over which they no (or little) control than over things which they have control. It was also interesting to find that even when people have control, they rarely exercise it. It seems we get more pleasure complaining than fixing the world.
Olelifan
The concept is fine: a Malcolm Gladwell-style pop-science look at the psychology and social history of complaint would have made for a fascinating little book.

But Julian Baggini's short entry - very short: it is done and dusted in 130 pages - is neither focussed or organised enough to pull that off. It reads more like a loosely-themed ramble through a field of the author's favourite hobby horses.

Baggini describes himself as a "philosopher" - every man's right, I suppose - but it does imply some sort of tenured academic role, whereas the most I can extract from a quick Google is that he has a PhD in philosophy and has fashioned for himself a role as a public commentator of sorts on matters ethical and metaphysical. However good his philosophical credentials, they don't qualify him especially well to write a pop-science book on complaint: you'd think a psychologist, psychiatrist or sociologist might be better equipped for that.

Nor, having read his offering, does he appear to have much of substance to say. In 130 parsimoniously entexted pages he manages to distract himself from the subject at hand on a number of occasions, wandering off piste into tangential ruminations on what appear (from his other writings) to be pet subjects - particularly religion and atheism. Elsewhere he doesn't really fashion much of an argument: there's a cursory attempt to categorise types of complaint and a half-hearted reader survey from which Baggini draws half-hearted conclusions, but he doesn't really have anything to say other than "complaint has its place, and isn't all bad".

Some respectable commentators have found value in his book, however: Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times, for whom I have a great deal of respect, raved about it (and on that recommendation I bought it), so perhaps it just caught me on a bad day.

But all the same, I can't see this one tipping The Tipping Point out of the bestseller list anytime soon.

Olly Buxton