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by Kathleen M. Higgins,Robert C. Solomon
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Philosophy
  • Author:
    Kathleen M. Higgins,Robert C. Solomon
  • ISBN:
    0805241574
  • ISBN13:
    978-0805241570
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Schocken; 1 edition (February 22, 2000)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Philosophy
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1261 kb
  • ePUB format
    1573 kb
  • DJVU format
    1200 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    513
  • Formats:
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What Nietzsche Really Said gives us a lucid overview - both informative and entertaining - of perhaps the most widely .

What Nietzsche Really Said gives us a lucid overview - both informative and entertaining - of perhaps the most widely read and least understood philosopher in history. Friedrich Nietzsche's aggressive independence, flamboyance, sarcasm, and celebration of strength have struck responsive chords in contemporary culture. More people than ever are reading and discussing his writings. In this lively and comprehensive analysis, Nietzsche scholars Robert C. Solomon and Kathleen M. Higgins get to the heart of Nietzsche's philosophy, from his ideas on ''the will to power'' to his attack on religion and morality and his infamous Гњbermensch (superman).

In this lively and comprehensive analysis, Nietzsche scholars Robert C. Higgins get to the heart of Nietzsche's philosophy, from his ideas on "the will to power" to his attack on religion and morality and his infamous Übermensch (superman). What Nietzsche Really Said offers both guidelines and insights for reading and understanding this controversial thinker. Written with sophistication and wit, See all Product description.

Электронная книга "What Nietzsche Really Said", Robert C. Solomon, Kathleen M. Higgins. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "What Nietzsche Really Said" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Higgins's What Nietzsche Really Sa id (New York: Schocken Books-Random House, 2000) Steven C. Scheer . Of course, Solomon and Higgins clearly imply that their boo k is about what Nietzsche has really meant (to say) by saying what he does, in f act, say. Really. Scheer stevenscheeray. com The title, What Nietzsche Really Said, was not quite freely chosen by the book's authors, Robert C. The book is part of Schocke n's What They Really Said Series.

What Nietzsche really said. by. Solomon, Robert C; Higgins, Kathleen Marie. Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1844-1900. New York : Schocken Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana.

A Short History of Philosophy with Kathleen M. Higgins (Oxford, 1996). What Nietzsche Really Said (Random House/Schocken, 2000). About Love: Reinventing Romance for Our Times (Simon & Schuster, 1988).

Kathleen Higgins and Robert Solomon's comprehensive, lucid, and often humorous overview .

Kathleen Higgins and Robert Solomon's comprehensive, lucid, and often humorous overview of Nietzsche's philosophy sings with the joy of his own work-a joy, th. .Excepting Sigmund Freud, no thinker in recent history has been more talked about and less understood than Friedrich Nietzsche.

This book can be found in: Spirituality & Beliefs Philosophy History of Western philosophy. What Nietzsche Really Said (Hardback). Professor Robert C. Solomon (author), Kathleen Marie Higgins (author). Kathleen M. Higgins, Robert C. Solomon. The Age of German Idealism: Routledge History of Philosophy Volume VI. Category: science books, philosophy. 3. 6 Mb. A Companion to Aesthetics. Stephen Davies, Kathleen Marie Higgins, Robert Hopkins, Robert Stecker, David E. Cooper. 7 Mb. The Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche. Bernd Magnus, Kathleen Higgins.

University of Texas at Austin. Nietzsche and His Zarathustra: A Western Poet's Transformation of an Eastern Priest and Prophet. Similar books and articles. This article has no associated abstract. Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. Friedrich Nietzsche in 19th Century Philosophy. David Aiken - 2003 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 55 (4):335-353. Ten Tips for a Great Marriage According to Friedrich Nietzsche. Added to PP index 2015-02-13.

What Nietzsche Really Said gives us a lucid overview -- both informative and entertaining -- of perhaps the most widely read and least understood philosopher in history.Friedrich Nietzsche's aggressive independence, flamboyance, sarcasm, and celebration of strength have struck responsive chords in contemporary culture. More people than ever are reading and discussing his writings. But Nietzsche's ideas are often overshadowed by the myths and rumors that surround his sex life, his politics, and his sanity. In this lively and comprehensive analysis, Nietzsche scholars Robert C. Solomon and Kathleen M. Higgins get to the heart of Nietzsche's philosophy, from his ideas on "the will to power" to his attack on religion and morality and his infamous Übermensch (superman).What Nietzsche Really Said offers both guidelines and insights for reading and understanding this controversial thinker. Written with sophistication and wit, this book provides an excellent summary of the life and work of one of history's most provocative philosophers.

Agrainel
Nietzsche is undoubtedly the most enigmatic, confusing, and ambiguous philosopher of all time. For most of us, we want answers, not more confusion. Fortunately, we have two very able individuals who have studied, analyzed, and understood Nietzsche, at least in a way that makes his insights accessible. They are Robert Solomon and Walter Kaufman. Solomon, an analytic philosopher by training and disposition, has unraveled much of Nietzsche in an articulate, coherent, and powerful way. The consequence is pregnant with riches of existential insight. His clarity and precision, the hallmarks of analytic philosophy, are everywhere evident.

Nietzsche's style and manner, so foreign to most of us, is his purpose. While Nietzsche has a handful of strong beliefs, his overriding belief is that of liberation from the imprisonment of our Western inheritance. Hostile to received Traditions, Nietzsche is determined to find alternative perspectives, but he's not about to become the very thing that he deplores, another dogmatist. Hence, rather than compelling arguments, a coherent world view, a grand metaphysic, an endorsement of slave morality, or other dogmatic claims, Nietzsche's scheme of liberation is to tear down the inherited frameworks, and give direction, but few prescriptions, to the alternatives. Solomon provides a fresh, clear, and coherent distillation of that project.

The project is inherently dangerous, and has been misused and abused by many, most notably Hitler. Nietzsche is partly responsible, because his deconstruction is more obvious than his reconstruction. But the new paradigm that Nietzsche intended had little to do with Hitler's agenda and misappropriation. Solomon is able to give us a "truer" Nietzsche, with a number of caveats, provisional claims, and a lot of tentativeness. But these "reservations" and "provisional perspectives" are themselves at the core of Nietzsche's existentialist thought. Rather than create a new metaphysic out of whole cloth, Nietzsche is content with providing the tools for us to work them out for ourselves. And yes, that's risky.

The hyper-rationalism inherited from Socrates's logocentrism, the "slave" morality inherited from Judeo-Christian nihilism, and the denial of our "animal" natures by the whole of Western philosophy are just a few of Nietzsche's targets. Such a logocentric, slavish, and dispassionate perspective is utterly false. To demonstrate the error, Nietzsche frequently finds resources in the pre-Socratics, where free inquiry still occurred, and where dogmatism is less evident. And one of Nietzsche's schemes is the use of the Greek gods Apollo and Dionysus as tools for reconciliation. Apollo represents the strong, forceful, rational, and brave; Dionysus represents the carefree, receptive, emotive, and joyful. Unlike nearly all of Western Tradition, which sets Apollo over Dionysus, Nietzsche desires their reunification in an integral self.

Despite Solomon's masterful and persuasive overview, in a surprisingly short space, further synopsis here is not feasible. Suffice it for my purposes to hail this work as a great achievement, worthy of wide readership, and a life-affirming alternative to the West's nihilistic and impoverished "Man." Many, if not most, of Nietzsche's new perspectives on the integral life of "becoming who one is," rather than conforming to malformed conception of Humanity from Western nihilism, is truly liberating. Also, I'm more convinced than ever that direct acquaintance with Nietzsche is still improbable, at least for me, and I suspect for many. That makes Solomon's contribution even more valuable. In addition to Solomon and Kaufman, Rollo May (esp.) and Eric Fromm offer great insight from the psychological tradition.

In the wadi of nihilism and despair of the present day, despite our technological achievements to placate us, we are right to want a wholly different perspective about the most pressing questions about life itself. Our inherited Traditions have failed because they are fundamentally wrong. Fortunately, we can still reconnect with our true selves and make our lives meaningful and joyous once again. Nietzsche's seminal ideas can be of immense help, and Solomon's and Kaufman's, Fromm's, and May's insights from Nietzsche's treasury of wisdom are now accessible to those of us who cannot abide his confusion, enigma, and ambiguity. Highly recommended.
Stan
This is a good overview and introduction to Nietzsche, although the writing is sometimes a bit repetitive. But the book is pitched at the right level for someone who knows little or nothing about Nietzsche, but who would like to know more before delving into the original texts. There are a number of books around that analyze Nietzsche's work, but they tend to be advanced studies written for other Nietzsche experts, promoting some particular view or approach. Here you'll find a valuable chapter entitled "Faced with a Book by Nietzsche," that gives short synopses of each of his works, and in the order in which they were published. That latter is important, because Nietzsche's ideas developed and changed somewhat from one book to another; to make sense of those variations you need to know where in the stream you are dipping your toe. The chapters on God and morality are also quite good, and the glossary of favorite images at the back is well worth having around. The authors are also careful to warn the reader that "The Will to Power" is not really a book by Nietzsche, but rather a selection and arrangement by others of jottings from his notebooks, material that he did not choose to publish; those notes are sometimes interesting to Nietzsche scholars for the light they may throw on the things he did publish, but other uses are much harder to justify.

Solomon has a later book, 'Living With Nietzsche,' that overlaps a good deal with this one. This is the better written and more useful of the two. If you are looking to follow this one with a somewhat more advanced analysis, I'd recommend Brian Leiter's 'Nietzsche on Morality,' which is excellent.
Zovaithug
I found in this book the usual Solomon: fluent and elegant writing and idiosyncratic thinking. I feel his reading of Nietzsche to be somewhat misleading, although this may not be entirely his fault since Nietzsche himself was somewhat contradictory and cryptic. Yet considering him basically as a moral philosopher misses the point. He was basically a critical philosopher in the sense of analyzing what lies behind the facade of established thinking and institutions, of exposing the untold connections between power and knowledge, culture and life. An authentic precursor of postmodernism if you will, as was correctly understood by Bataille and Foucault, among others.
Usaxma
If you want to know about Nietzsche, by all means read this book. But if you want to wake up your mind be sure and read this book. The authors manage to convey complex, intriguing ideas (relativism and the eternal return to mention two) using a clear, simple format that can be grasped by those of us who have not studied philosophy. A stroll through Nietzsche's mind is an education, an education that is necessary to an understanding of contemporary thought. Be sure to read this book if you want to get the most out of John Cleese's "A Fish Called Wanda" and Milan Kundera's "Unbearable Lightness of Being."The Accordion