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by Graeme Earl,Sarah Poppy,David Wheatley
Download Contemporary Themes in Archaeological Computing (University of Southampton Department of Archaeology Monograph) fb2
Archaeology
  • Author:
    Graeme Earl,Sarah Poppy,David Wheatley
  • ISBN:
    1842170538
  • ISBN13:
    978-1842170533
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxbow Books (December 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    110 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Archaeology
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David Wheatley is a Professor of Archaeology and Associate Dean (Education) within Humanities at the .

David Wheatley is a Professor of Archaeology and Associate Dean (Education) within Humanities at the University of Southampton. I completed my BSc in Archaeology from University College Cardiff 1988, my MSc in Archaeology Computing at Southampton 1988/9, and my PhD in Archaeological Applications of GIS with Case Studies in Neolithic Wessex at Southampton in 1994. I was co-director of Negotiating Avebury Project (1999-2004) with Josh Pollard and Mark Gillings.

Professor Graeme Earl is Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Southampton and Director of Enterprise . Contemporary themes in archaeological computing. University of Southampton Department of Archaeology Monograph; No. 3). Oxford, UK: Oxbow books.

Professor Graeme Earl is Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Southampton and Director of Enterprise and Impact (Humanities). Keay, . Earl, . Beale, . Davis, . Ogden, . Strutt, .

Wheatley, . & Poppy, S. (Ed. (2002).

University of Southampton Department of Archaeology Monograph, .

University of Southampton Department of Archaeology Monograph, 3. English.

Contemporary Themes in Archaeological Computing (University of Southampton Department of Archaeology Monograph, 3). ISBN. 1842170538 (ISBN13: 9781842170533).

David Wheatley of University of Southampton, Southampton Read 83. .

David Wheatley of University of Southampton, Southampton Read 83 publications Contact David Wheatley.

David Wheatley, University of Southampton, Archaeology Department .

David Wheatley, University of Southampton, Archaeology Department, Faculty Member. Studies Archaeology, Digital Humanities, and Prehistoric Archaeology. More Info: David Wheatley 1993 IN Computing the past: computer applications and quantitative methods in archaeology - CAA 92 J. Andresen, T. Madsen & I. Scollar (eds) Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 133-8.

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Wheatley, David, Earl, Graeme and Poppy, Sarah (ed. (2002) Contemporary themes in archaeological computing (University of Southampton Department of Archaeology Monograph, 3), Oxford, UK. Oxbow books, 110pp.

It was founded in 1978 and has grown from a small department based at Micklegate House to more than a hundred undergraduate students based at King's Manor and with scientific facilities at the BioArCh centre on the main campus.

Twelve papers that reflect current themes in archaeological computing, from the development of new techniques, to working methodologies and the potential of computing to archaeological research. Contents: Introduction (David Wheatley, Graeme Earl & Sarah Poppy); Virtual reconstruction and the interpretative process: a case-study from Avebury (Graeme Earl & David Wheatley); Rock art and aeBubble worldsAe (Jayne Gidlow); The use and abuse of statistical methods in archaeological site location modelling (Patricia E. Woodman & Mark Woodward); An assessment of the SMR as a predictive tool for cultural resource management, development control and academic research (Paul Cuming); Quantifying the British Palaeolithic: Regional Data and Hominid Adaptations (Rob Hosfield); Maritime Fife, Managing FifeAes Underwater Heritage: A feasibility study for a Maritime Archaeological GIS (Deanna Groom & Ian Oxley); Field digital data acquisition (FDA) using total station and pencomputer: A working methodology (Marek Ziebart, Nick Holder & Peter Dare); Electronic Publication in Archaeology (Anja-Christina Wolle); In Search of a Defensible Site: A GIS Analysis of Hampshire Hillforts (Jenny Mitcham); The Potential of Geostatistics in the Analysis of Fieldwalking Data (David Ebert); An application of proximity graphs in Archaeological spatial analysis (Diego Jimenez & Dave Chapman).