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by McKie,Chris Stringer
Download African Exodus: The Origins of Modern Humanity fb2
Anthropology
  • Author:
    McKie,Chris Stringer
  • ISBN:
    0224037714
  • ISBN13:
    978-0224037716
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Jonathan Cape; First edition (December 31, 1996)
  • Pages:
    267 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Anthropology
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1431 kb
  • ePUB format
    1248 kb
  • DJVU format
    1112 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    314
  • Formats:
    txt doc lit txt


African Exodus covered so much more of the world, geographically and so many early humanoids than I expected.

African Exodus covered so much more of the world, geographically and so many early humanoids than I expected. The ending was important and everything in the book built toward it powerfully. The reference list is very interesting as well. Robin McKie is a science writer. conquered the world in a few millenia.

African exodus: the origins of modern humanity. Chris Stringer is the author of the widely acclaimed African Exodus, Lone Survivors, and more than two hundred books and papers on the subject of human evolution. In sharp contrast to the multiregional interpretation of hominid development offered by Milford Wolpoff and Rachel Caspari in Race and Human Evolution (LJ 12/96), Stringer, director of the Human.

Originally published: London : Cape, 1996. Includes bibliographical references (p. -270) and index

Originally published: London : Cape, 1996. -270) and index. We emerged out of Africa," the authors contend, "less than 100,000 years ago and replaced all other human populations. Our genes betray this secret of common racial heritage; further, the apparent racial distinctions of modern.

Christopher Stringer's book, African Exodus: The Origins of Modern Humanity is a thoughtful, very well-written and detailed presentation of the prevailing model associated with modern human origins known as "The Out-of-Africa" hypothesis. Stringer is not only an incredibly articulate advocate for the model, but he is generally thought of as one of the principal architects of the hypothesis.

We emerged out of Africa," the authors contend, "less than 100,000 years ago and replaced all other human populations. Our genes betray this secret of common racial heritage; further, the apparent racial distinctions of modern humans that have given rise to centuries of prejudice and inequality are shown to be merely geographical variants. African exodus: the origins of modern humanity. by Chris Stringer and Robin McKie

African Exodus: The Origins of Modern Humanity. by Chris Stringer and Robin McKie. A Choice Outstanding Academic Book A Library Journal Best Sci-Tech Book A New York Times Notable Book. Once in a generation a book such as African Exodus emerges to transform the way we see ourselves.

While Stringer and McKie describe how noses and skin color have been shaped in different regions, they deny . Stringer does a great job of getting his point across, and he does not treat neandertals in a poor way.

Stringer does a great job of getting his point across, and he does not treat neandertals in a poor way.

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Stringer c mckie r 1996 african exodus the origins of. School Arizona State University. Stringer C, McKie R. 1996. New York: Henry Holt. Course Title SOS 111. Type. Urban ecology and its application in Europe. Pages 1–22 in Sukopp H, Hejny S, Kowarik I, eds. Urban Ecology: Plants and Plant Communities in Urban Environments. The Hague (The Netherlands): SPB Academic Publishers.

By: Chris Stringer and Robin Mckie. The theory of an African genesis for modern humankind is one of the most controversial in science, and states that all of us are descended from one race that emerged from Africa 70,000 years ago, replacing all other human populations

By: Chris Stringer and Robin Mckie. 267 pages, B/w illus. Publisher: Jonathan Cape. The theory of an African genesis for modern humankind is one of the most controversial in science, and states that all of us are descended from one race that emerged from Africa 70,000 years ago, replacing all other human populations. It is therefore based on a revolution in the history and anthropology of early humans, and in this book the theory's most forceful advocate - Dr Stringer of London's Natural History Museum - explains the evidence for the new view of our species' origins. By: Chris Stringer and Robin Mckie.

The theory of an African genesis for modern humanity is one of the most controversial in science. It is based on a revolution in the history and anthropology of early humans and this book explains the evidence for this view of our species' origin. A superb, exciting and above all readable account of the long process which 'transformed us from minor bit players in an ecological soap opera into evolutionary superstars'.

Alsath
I am taking an Art History class, which gave me a bit of perspective on the time periods discussed in this book. That class began with Paleolithic art ca. 40,000 BCE. African Exodus covered so much more of the world, geographically and so many early humanoids than I expected. The ending was important and everything in the book built toward it powerfully.

The reference list is very interesting as well. I will definitely look at those articles. I really enjoyed this book and heartily recommend it.
Goodman
Comprehensive study of the dispersion of homo sapiens across the earth.
Thofyn
Kindling.
Anasius
Very informative reading material.
Jaberini
Lots of guess work in this book. Not as well written as i would have expected. it is a tough subject, but I was not comfortable with this read,
Jack
Well worth the read and this book will continue to have a place on my bookshelf in the years to come.
Balhala
Christopher Brian Stringer (born 1947) is a British anthropologist who is a Research Leader in Human Origins at the Natural History Museum. Robin McKie is a science writer. They wrote in the Preface to this 1996 book, "For the past few years, a small group of scientists... have shown that we belong to a young species, which... conquered the world in a few millenia. The story... challenges many basic assumptions we have about ourselves: that 'races' deeply divide our populations; that we owe our success to our big brains; and that our ascent was an inevitable one. Far from it... Neanderthals became extinct even though they had bigger brains than Homo sapiens; while chance as much as 'good design' has favored our evolution."

They summarize, "an upright, small-brained ape gave rise to several different hominid lines and eventually... led to the emergence of Homo sapiens... one group of our immediate predecessors, the Neanderthals... [were] an intelligent species in their own right---although... we have learned that they are not the ancestors of human beings today, but are more like... cousins." (Pg. 83)

They argue, "Of course, there was clearly no single exodus, no one triumphant army of early hunter-gatherers who were led Out of Africa toward a new world by a Paleolithic Moses. Instead, our exodus would have occurred in trickles as our ancestors slowly seeped out of the continent, expanding their hunting ranges and taking over new territory." (Pg. 160-161)

They state, "The progeny of the people who found Australia 50,000 years ago, and the descendants of the tribes who poured down the Americas 12,000 years ago, as well as the heirs to all those other settlers of Europe, Africa, and Asia, share a common biological bond. They are all the children of those Africans who emerged from their homeland only a few ticks ago on our evolutionary clock... underneath our species has scarcely differentiated at all." (Pg. 177) They add, "Our exodus's timescale is so brief that only slight differences, if any, in intellect and innate behavior are likely to have evolved between modern human populations." (Pg. 183) They suggest, "it was the genetic capacity to speak a complex language that raised modern humans from the millennia-long doldrums we were sharing with the Neanderthals until 40,000 years ago. It gave us the power to take over the world." (Pg. 205)

This book will be of definite interest (whether or not one accepts all of the arguments and evidence presented) to anyone studying the orgins of humanity, as well as various modern ethnic groups.
Christopher Stringer does an amazingly poor job of evaluating the issue of human origins. He shows either a profound lack of understanding of the competing viewpoints or an intentionally unethical treatment of them. Even the subtitle of his book - The Response to the Bell Curve - is misleading. It implies that those who do not agree with his opinion support the findings of the Bell Curve. Instead of analyzing the data in terms of strict scientific methodology of hypothesis testing and REFUTATION he sets up a strawman which he tears down. Unfortunately this strawman bears little or no resemblance to the actual theories that he is claiming to refute. By continually portraying his theories as the ONLY basis on which all of humanity can unite under a common heritage, he misrepresents opposing views to the point of slander. He intentionally links today's multiregionalists(opposing viewpoint) with the ill-conceived theories of the past when these authors have consistently and effectively demonstrated how they significantly differ. He clearly hopes to link those who disagree with him to racist scientists of the past. Again, this either demonstrates that Christopher Stringer has not bothered to read the literature in his own field or he is intentionally attempting to misrepresent others.