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by Jack Kevorkian
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Death & Grief
  • Author:
    Jack Kevorkian
  • ISBN:
    0879756772
  • ISBN13:
    978-0879756772
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Prometheus Books; 1st edition (September 1, 1991)
  • Pages:
    268 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Death & Grief
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1505 kb
  • ePUB format
    1866 kb
  • DJVU format
    1464 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    558
  • Formats:
    doc txt azw rtf


Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Prescription: Medicide: The Goodness of Planned Death as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Prescription: Medicide is the second album release by Dutch Aggrotech band, Grendel

Prescription: Medicide is the second album release by Dutch Aggrotech band, Grendel. It was released in Europe on January 15, 2004 through NoiTekk Records and in the United States on October 8, 2004 through Metropolis Records. All lyrics are written by VLRK.

† Kevorkian, Jack (1991). Prescription: Medicide, the Goodness of Planned Death. ISBN 978-0-87975-872-1 – via Internet Archive. Kevorkian, Jack (2004).

com's Jack Kevorkian Page and shop for all Jack Kevorkian books. Are You an Author? Help us improve our Author Pages by updating your bibliography and submitting a new or current image and biography. Learn more at Author Central. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Jack Kevorkian. Slimmeriks and the demi-diet.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. the goodness of planned death. Published 1991 by Prometheus Books in Buffalo, . from ShutTheFrontDoor! Are you sure you want to remove e from your list? e.

Jack Kevorkian, the medical pathologist who willfully helped dozens of terminally ill people end their lives, becoming the central figure in a national drama surrounding assisted suicide, died on Friday in Royal Oa. Mich

Jack Kevorkian, the medical pathologist who willfully helped dozens of terminally ill people end their lives, becoming the central figure in a national drama surrounding assisted suicide, died on Friday in Royal Oa. Mich.

For many years Dr. Kevorkian was at the center of the red-hot debate over physician-assisted suicide. The inventor of the "suicide machine" stirred up both admiration and controversy. His "Deaths with Dignity" won him the accolades of the pro-choice movement.

PRESCRIPTION: MEDICIDE. Kevorkian, gadfly of the medical profession and inventor of the & machine,'' speaks his mind on the ethics of death. Its title notwithstanding, this is not primarily a discussion of euthanasia-or & the author's term for euthanasia performed by professional medical personnel-but, rather, largely a defense of his position that death-row inmates should be given the option of execution by general anaesthesia, thus permitting use of their bodies for experimentation and. harvesting of their organs.

ISBN13: 9780879758721. Expertly curated help for Prescription : Medicide. Plus easy-to-understand solutions written by experts for thousands of other textbooks

ISBN13: 9780879758721. Cover type: Paperback. Plus easy-to-understand solutions written by experts for thousands of other textbooks. You can cancel at any time.

For many years Dr. Kevorkian was at the center of the red-hot debate over physician-assisted suicide. The inventor of the "suicide machine" stirred up both admiration and controversy. His "Deaths with Dignity" won him the accolades of the pro-choice movement. Other groups, like Operation Rescue, the AMA, the Hemlock Society, and especially the Michigan State Legislature, insisted that Kevorkian had gone too far. His much-publicized campaign to assist the terminally ill to commit suicide eventually led to his prosecution and imprisonment.In Prescription: Medicide, the famed "suicide doctor" talks about why he was so committed to his struggle. He addresses the need to assist the terminally ill to die, how death row inmates should be allowed to donate organs after their deaths, and the need for medical reform to create a rational program of dignified, humane, beneficial planned death.

Tyler Is Not Here
Its a horrible "reprint" which is just like a cheap photocopy.
Chuynopana
Awesome book
Nten
I expected more explicit information, and was disappointed to find out that it was an effort to persuade the public to pass laws allowing prisoners to donate their bodies to medicine.
Eng.Men
My curiousity told me to read this, and I was amazed at the depth of it all (and knowing that is was illegal). The human mind is a scary thing!
Mr.Champions
The person I gave it to as a 60th birthday present hasn't taken the hint yet. Perhaps I need to buy another one of Dr. K's books for further encouragement. Remember, once the window of opportunity to leave with dignity is closed, it is closed forever.
Questanthr
``Dr. Death'' got his start with campaigns to allow death row inmates to donate their organs (currently organ donation is impossible). If you take a heart, a liver, two kidneys, two corneas, and bone marrow from a willing donor with a known execution date, and you can save quite a few lives with his death.
It's common-sense arguments like these, not grisly death-obsession, that makes this book worth reading. I expect that some readers will find the sections on euthanasia distasteful, but the subject is handled carefully and smartly.
For all his faults, Kevorkian is a strong and articulate voice who is too often written off automatically as a crank and a murderer. Read this book in order to balance your perspective, then judge him if you wish.
Qwne
Dr. Jack Kevorkian's 1991 book advocating voluntary medical experimentation on, and organ donation from, death row inmates and assisted suicide patients is written in a clear, lucid, and intelligent manner. Kevorkian argues why euthanasia-- given the right controls-- should be legal and available to terminally ill and suffering patients. Anybody who thinks this man is a nutcase will change his or her mind after reading this well-thought out book. He also makes us look at our own knee-jerk reactions to certain issues regarding death and see how irrational they are. The world needs more brilliant minds like Dr. Jack Kevorkian.
Jack Kevorkian
Prescription: Medicide:
The Goodness of Planned Death

(Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books, 1991)
(ISBN: 0-87975-677-2; hardcover)
(Library of Congress call number: R726.K48 1991)

The world-famous 'assisted-suicide' doctor
tells of his life-long efforts to permit prisoners condemned to death
to donate their organs and/or give their bodies to be used in medical research.
After about 200 pages, he gets around to discussing his efforts
to make physician-assisted voluntary death acceptable in America.
This book is filled with Dr. Kevorkian's personal quirks,
but it is nevertheless worth reading
for its contribution to the on-going debate about the right-to-die.

Kevorkian suggests that transplant-teams could go to prisons
in order to harvest the organs donated by prisoners on death-row
immediately after their executions.
But this reviewer believe the public would initially be strongly against
such mixing of capital punishment and organ-donation.
But he has nevertheless started a website in favor of this change:
Search the Internet for this website: "ORGAN DONATION AFTER EXECUTION".
And he has also started a Facebook Page called:
Prisoner Organ Donation.

Kevorkian would permit permanent unconsciousness as a definition of death,
which would be wisest for the purpose of keeping the organs alive.
General anesthesia could be administered to the condemned prisoner.
He or she could be pronounced dead
because consciousness has gone out for the last time.
Then the still-breathing body (sustained by artificial means)
could be transported to the appropriate medical center,
which has agreed in advance to accept the anatomical donation.
(Perhaps a prison guard would have to accompany the donated body
to make sure that no one attempts to 'revive' the executed prisoner.)

For greater public acceptance of organ donation after execution,
the concept of 'brain-death' will have more traction than 'permanent unconsciousness'.
Also transplant centers are well-accustomed to dealing with brain-dead donors.

After execution by the most appropriate means,
resulting in a certified and recorded brain-death,
the prisoner who has volunteered to donate his organs after execution
will have his or her brain-dead body sustained on 'life-support' equipment.

This would not be different from keeping accident victims 'alive'
on life-support machinery until their organs can be harvested
and transplanted into the most appropriate recipients.
All of these procedures take place after death has been declared.

Since capital punishment has fallen out of favor in many places,
an idea not mentioned by Dr. Kevorkian might be implemented: voluntary execution.
Prisoners who would otherwise have to live in prison for the rest of their lives
would be given the option of voluntary execution
(with elaborate safeguards to prevent coercion).
Most of these would be murderers who were condemned to life-imprisonment for their crimes.
And some of them might like to make amends by donating their bodies
so that their organs could be used to save several lives
that would otherwise end without those donated organs.
Kevorkian did discover surprisingly positive attitudes
among prisoner about donating their organs.

Transplant surgeons will not accept organs from prisoners
until after much more public debate has settled the legal and moral questions.
Doctors want iron-clad guarantees
that they will never be sued or otherwise sanctioned by anyone
or indicted by the prosecutor for committing any crime.

Kevorkian weakens the basic arguments of this book
by including a fictional chapter
about medical experiments performed on a condemned man.
No medical institution or prison
would allow medical experimenters into the execution chamber.
Kevorkian's idea is that the condemned man
has nothing to lose if the experiment goes bad:
He is going to die in a few minutes in any case.
If Jack Kevorkian re-publishes this book,
he should leave this chapter out.

Before any life-threatening medical experiments are permitted,
the body upon which the experiments are to be performed must be declared dead.
Permanent unconsciousness (achieved by drugs or brain-surgery)
might be used as the criterion for determining that death has taken place.
Or well-recognized criteria for brain-death could be used.
After the official declaration of death,
the 'living cadaver' can be transported to the medical center
that has agreed in advance to receive it.
Prisoners who choose voluntary execution
might lead the way for all kinds of new medical uses for 'living cadavers'.
Both "voluntary execution" and "living cadaver" are good Internet search terms.

Jack Kevorkian might be called the Lone Ranger of the Right-to-Die.
He has not cooperated with others who are committed to this right.
And often his comments seem so out-of-touch with public opinion
that one wonders if he ever got any feedback for his writing
before sending it off to the publisher.
Nevertheless, he became for a time
the best-known name in the right-to-die movement.
And now that he is out of jail once again,
he has opportunities to speak wherever he wishes.
People will hear him because of his famous name.

This book was published before he had helped many people to die.
So perhaps he should write another book now that he has retired from that work.
He can help us all to think more deeply about the right-to-die,
based on his front-line experiences of helping others to die.

Some parts of this book suggest that Dr. Kevorkian does not distinguish
between irrational suicide and voluntary death.
As long as the patient has considered some alternatives
and has now decided to die, then he or she should be helped.
Kevorkian tells us that he has turned down many more people
than people he has helped to die.
But, of course, the press covered only the people who killed themselves with his help.

In this reviewer's opinion,
Jack Kevorkian did not fulfill enough safeguards
for the people whom he helped to die.
He just wanted to know the medical condition
and he wanted to make sure that the patient himself or herself
was willing and able to take the final actions that would bring death.
When he violated his own principles
--by being too actively involved in the last death--
he was tried and convicted of murder in the second degree.
Interestingly enough, he was not tried or convicted
for the crime of assisting a suicide,
which is basically what he was doing in the eyes of most observers.

This reviewer would say that Dr. Kevorkian was assisting in voluntary deaths.

This was an early book in the modern debate about the right-to-die.
And if it is published again,
it should focus on either organs from the executed
or on voluntary death and merciful death,
not both the right-to-die and organ donation.
The expression "medicide" never caught on.
It was meant to describe any death achieved by a doctor.
And the sub-title is hard to pronounce:
"The Goodness of Planned Death".
"Voluntary death" or "freely-chosen death" would have been better.
Another pleasing expression is "timely death".

Since you have read to the end of this book-review,
you are probably deeply interested in the right-to-die.
You will find my recommendations for other books to read on the Internet:
"Books on the Right-to-Die".

James Leonard Park, advocate of the right-to-die with careful safeguards.