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by Melvin I. Urofsky
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Death & Grief
  • Author:
    Melvin I. Urofsky
  • ISBN:
    0700610103
  • ISBN13:
    978-0700610105
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ Pr of Kansas (April 1, 2000)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Death & Grief
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1727 kb
  • ePUB format
    1880 kb
  • DJVU format
    1799 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    624
  • Formats:
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Lethal Judgments book.

Lethal Judgments book. Start by marking Lethal Judgments: Assisted Suicide and American Law (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Part of the Landmark Law Cases and American Society Series). by Melvin I. Urofsky. Lethal Judgments examines those cases, the law surrounding the plaintiffs' claims, and the moral debate over physician-assisted suicide.

Lethal Judgments examines those cases, the law . Because right-to-die cases are likely to come before the high court again, this book provides students and general readers with a timely appreciation o. .

Lethal Judgments examines those cases, the law surrounding the plaintiffs' claims, and the moral debate over physician-assisted suicide. By treating assisted suicide simply as a legal question, observes Urofsky, we miss the real importance of the issue. Because right-to-die cases are likely to come before the high court again, this book provides students and general readers with a timely appreciation of their importance for legal theory and a useful way to reflect upon the choice between life and death. Discusses the tangled legal, historical, ethical, & medical issues related to right-to-die arguments through a clear examination of landmark Supreme Court cases including Quill v. Vacco.

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1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Lethal Judgments from your list? Lethal Judgments. Assisted Suicide and American Law (Landmark Law Cases and American Society). Published April 5, 2000 by University Press of Kansas.

Sexual Harassment and the Law: The Mechelle Vinson Case (Landmark Law Cases and American Society). A timely work exploring both incarceration and its consequences for the post-war Japanese American community. -Journal of Asian American Studies. The Struggle for Student Rights: Tinker v. Des Moines and the 1960s (Landmark Law Cases and American Society). This is an admirable compilation of the many strands and layers of this complex history.

Urofsky, Melvin I. (2000) Lethal judgments :assisted suicide and American law Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas

Urofsky, Melvin I. : University Press of Kansas, MLA Citation. Urofsky, Melvin I. Lethal Judgments: Assisted Suicide And American Law. Lawrence, Kan. : University Press Of Kansas, 2000. These citations may not conform precisely to your selected citation style. Please use this display as a guideline and modify as needed.

I have started a new book titled Lethal Judgments: Assisted Suicide and American Law (Landmark Law Cases & American Society). This book is centered on one of the most hotly debated medical questions of the day, euthanasia. Euthanasia is the practice of assisted suicide, generally in the case of extreme suffering and little to no chance of recovery. Do people have the right to let themselves die? Where is the line drawn between this ‘assisted suicide’ and murder? These were the questions answered by the plaintiffs and the defendants as they argued before the United States Supreme Court.

Physician-assisted suicide is distinguished from euthanasia

Physician-assisted suicide is distinguished from euthanasia. Euthanasia is the act of putting to death a person suffering from an incurable condition. As a result of medical technology, Americans are living longer, and when individuals finally succumb to an illness, they linger longer and often in great pain. The Ninth Circuit concluded that the benefits of guaranteeing a terminally ill, competent adult the ultimate decision in the manner and timing of his death outweigh the potential harm. Throughout the Nation, Americans are engaged in an earnest and profound debate about the morality, legality, and practicality of physician-assisted suicide.

Melvin Irving Urofsky, American Historian, educator, director. A Voice That Spoke for Justice: The Life and Times of Stephen S. Wise (Suny Series in Modern Jewish History). In the first half of this century, a talented and charismatic leadership restructured the American Jewish community to meet the demands and opportunities of a pluralistic, secular society.

In two 1997 decisions, the Supreme Court ruled that there is no constitutional right to physician-assisted suicide. Yet for many people this concept strikes to the heart of our sense of liberty even as it tugs at our hearts in the face of human suffering.

Lethal Judgments examines those cases, the law surrounding the plaintiffs' claims, and the moral debate over physician-assisted suicide. A concise and gracefully written overview of one of the most complex and contentious areas of American law, it lays out the conflict between individuals supporting privacy rights, due process, and equal protection, and those for whom moral and ethical considerations trump such concepts.

Noted constitutional scholar Melvin Urofsky discusses the tangled legal, historical, ethical, and medical issues related to right-to-die arguments, then examines the Supreme Court's position in Washington v. Glucksberg and Quill v. Vacco. He shows how these 1997 cases relate to two other famous cases--Karen Ann Quinlan and Nancy Beth Cruzan--and carries the controversy up to the recent trials of Dr. Jack Kevorkian. Urofsky considers the many facets of this knotty argument. He differentiates between discontinuation of medical treatment, assisted suicide, and active euthanasia, and he sensitively examines the issue's social and religious contexts to enable readers to see both sides of the dispute. He also shows that in its ruling the Supreme Court did not slam the door on the subject but left it ajar by allowing states to legislate on the matter as Oregon has already done.

By treating assisted suicide simply as a legal question, observes Urofsky, we miss the real importance of the issue. For patients with AIDS, cancer, and other debilitating illnesses--or even for those feeble from age--physician-assisted suicide is an expression of personal autonomy, and as modern medicine learns new ways to prolong life, more and more people will seek to exercise this option. Because right-to-die cases are likely to come before the high court again, this book provides students and general readers with a timely appreciation of their importance for legal theory and a useful way to reflect upon the choice between life and death.