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by Jean Gimpel
Download The medieval machine: The industrial revolution of the Middle Ages fb2
Technology
  • Author:
    Jean Gimpel
  • ISBN:
    0704530988
  • ISBN13:
    978-0704530980
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wildwood House (1988)
  • Pages:
    294 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Technology
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1150 kb
  • ePUB format
    1337 kb
  • DJVU format
    1248 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    976
  • Formats:
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The Middle Ages, writes French scholar Jean Gimpel, saw an extraordinary flourishing of. .We are taught that the Medieval age was one of stagnation and superstition, when all hope of advance was put off until the Renaissance.

The Middle Ages, writes French scholar Jean Gimpel, saw an extraordinary flourishing of technological development throughout Europe. With the era came waterwheels and clock towers, nearly uniform machine parts and improvements in public hygiene, vaulting cathedrals and towering city walls, and a notion of spiritual and earthly progress that promised better things to come.

The Medieval Machine.

THE MEDIEVAL MACHINE Jean Gimpel is a medieval scholar and social historian whose previous book, The Cathedral Builders, was highly praised both in the United States and in Europe. He has lectured at Yale and other universities in the United States and at present lives in London. The Medieval Machine. 1. The Energy Resources of Europe and Their Development The Middle Ages introduced machinery into Europe on a scale no civilization had previously known. This was to be one of the main factors that led to the dominance of the Western hemisphere over the rest of the world.

Reprint of the 1976 ed. published by Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York. Includes bibliographical references and index

Reprint of the 1976 ed. Includes bibliographical references and index. The energy resources of Europe and their development - The agricultural revolution - Mining the mineral wealth of Europe - Environment and pollution - Labor conditions in three medieval industries - Villard de Honnecourt : architect and engineer - The mechanical clock : the key machine - Reason, mathematics, and experimental science - The end of an. Era.

Medieval Machine book. The common, simplistic view of the Middle Ages as religion-centered and materially backward is challenged by Jean Gimpel in this milestone study, originally published in 1976.

The Medieval Machine, by Jean Gimpel. With this post, I return to the history of the Middle Ages. As I have previously written, the Middle Ages were anything but dark. While Gimpel does not mention this, there was, of course, the development of movable type by Johannes Gutenberg in around 1439. The Dark in the Dark Ages.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Die Schreie der Verwundeten: Versuch über die Grausamkeit.

Similar books and articles. Four English Political Tracts of the Later Middle Ages. Christine Clarke - 2010 - Constellations (University of Alberta Student Journal) 1 (2). William Chester Jordan - 1979 - Speculum 54 (4):801-802. The Village and House in the Middle AgesJean Chapelot Robert Fossier Henry Cleere. Sheila Bonde - 1988 - Speculum 63 (3):637-641. Gold and Spices: The Rise of Commerce in the Middle AgesJean Favier Caroline Higgitt. James M. Murray - 2000 - Speculum 75 (3):689-691.

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Walking with Jesus: A Way Forward for the Church by Pope Francis. A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life by Brian Grazer. Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money by Nathaniel Popper. The Wright Brothers by David McCullough.

The Cathedral Builders. The Cult of Art: Against Art and Artists.

Jean Gimpel (10 October 1918 – 15 June 1996) was a French historian and medievalist. Gimpel was one of three sons of a French father, the art dealer René Gimpel, and an English mother, Florence, the youngest sister of Lord Duveen. Gimpel was brought up in luxury in a house in the Bois de Boulogne, though he went on to be educated in both France and Britain. He made his living as a diamond broker before establishing himself as a critic of the concept of the great artist. The Cathedral Builders. The End of the Future: The Waning of the High-Tech World.

The Middle Ages, writes French scholar Jean Gimpel, saw an extraordinary flourishing of technological development throughout Europe

The Middle Ages, writes French scholar Jean Gimpel, saw an extraordinary flourishing of technological development throughout Europe.


Yar
Some really interesting material! The author does have the defect of allowing himself to make predictions/analyses of the future which have turned out to be incorrect. But this is secondary to the main development of the book which does a nice job of filling in several hundred years of the history of western technology in a time that we often think of as "primitive".
Nahn
Ask history professors about medieval Europe and they will likely highlight its philosphical achievements and political and theogical conflict. Rarely will they talk about the technological achievements and their effects on society.

This books fill in that gap. For anyone interested in technological history you will find this book very interesting. From the machinery of mills to advancements of building technology to the necessity for unions, this books shows how we are not all that unlike medieval Europe. It even speaks of events that we do not think about; i.e. medieval Europe was much warmer and drier then it is today. Medieval Europe was not technologically stagnant, but made many advancements that lead the way for modern advanced society. Great book!
Bele
If your interested in medieval tech, this is a great book to start with. Well written and highly recommended read.
Rude
Dependent on what you want - this is great. I have to admit, I knew Jean Gimpel. I edited some of his treatises on futurism, but we always talked about the philosophy. Nothing wrong with medieval science. Mechanical clocks, prisms - sound and light and time - and Jean puts it all into this book with lots of pictures and diagrams.
Nenayally
During a trip to Portugal this summer, and after being surrounded by so many remnants of Medieval history, I had to learn more about the period. This book just blew my mind.
Tenius
The book held few surprises for me but is well written and contains a great deal of information, all of it documented. A previous review raised my ire. How can any history book become dated unless some therein is proved wrong or new discovers change the authors conclusions drastically. Of course if you're a snide and snarky wise ass revisionist it would make a difference. The traditionalists usually have drawn conclusions closer to the truth simply because their view of the world is closer to those that made the history. Revisionists look for ulterior motives based on their own political viewpoint in order to distort the past into an image they create to fit this viewpoint. The facts remain the same.
Itiannta
Overall, a great read about a very underdeveloped topic.

Medieval rarely sparks ideas about machinery, yet the people of the Middle Ages were surrounded by machines whether they were Cistercian Monks or laymen workers. You will learn a lot about an age overlooked by historians as one that was advanced, and only known for its later stages of warfare, famine, uprisings, and plagues. The book is almost an economic history with all of the information he provides about wages, productivity, charts, etc. His analysis is simple and easy to understand, with plenty of data to assist. Although some of his conclusions relating to economics (or the relation between people using their technology and labor) are one sided, there is plenty to learn from this book.

The chapters discuss how technological innovations during The Middle Ages revolutionized Western Europe. He discusses in length about: the importance of mills and their economic impacts; agricultural innovations like the horse collar, plow, and three field system; mining as well as the recirculation of gold coinage; and he even covers interesting topics like architecture, the environment and pollution, even briefly discussing European bathhouses.

However, there is as others have noted an anti-industrialist bias within the book. It is fairly obvious and easy to pick out from the interesting information. This hurts the economics within the book. Gimpel clearly sides with more socialist tendencies and sees past societies within distinct classes. He always labels those in power and able to hire as capitalists, as if it is an evil word. Also, he devotes some of his conclusion to deciding whether or not the Western world is beginning to decline, which I thought was out of place for the topic he was writing about. Despite this, the book is well worth reading. You will learn a lot about a period often overlooked as being backwards!
The medieval ages were far more like our modern age than we often think. The only thing that came to my mind prior to reading this book was knights and castles. Hardly a dark age as often portrayed, the period was full of industrial innovation, and Jean Gimpel makes an interesting survey of some of the inventions that came out of the period, discussing the engineering and architectural feats of the age.

The book was written in the 1970s, so it’s a little dated, but it was a fast and insightful read, shedding light to a beginning learner on a period of history that generally escapes notice but for as backdrop period films and sword and sorcery fantasies. I read it for a history class during my undergrad degree, but I have kept it and occasionally reviewed it since.