» » Quantum Mechanics (Student physics series)

Download Quantum Mechanics (Student physics series) fb2

by P. C. W. Davies
Download Quantum Mechanics (Student physics series) fb2
Physics
  • Author:
    P. C. W. Davies
  • ISBN:
    0710099622
  • ISBN13:
    978-0710099624
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge (February 9, 1984)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Physics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1185 kb
  • ePUB format
    1132 kb
  • DJVU format
    1712 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    197
  • Formats:
    azw lit txt lrf


Series: Physics and Its Applications (Book 8). Paperback: 178 pages. The book tends to be terse and requires that the reader use his or her imagination, at least for the first few chapters.

Series: Physics and Its Applications (Book 8). The mathematical treatment is kept to a minimum in the first few chapters but becomes intensive as well as deeper with the progressing chapters. Examples are kept at a level of simplicity to avoid confusing the reader or student.

Introduction to Quantum Physics (The . Introductory Physics Series). Quantum Physics: A Text for Graduate Students (Graduate Texts in Contemporary Physics). french, edwin f. taylor. Категория: Physics, Quantum Physics. 1. 9 Mb. Applications of self-adjoint extensions in quantum physics. Pavel Exner, Petr Seba. Категория: Mathematics, Mathematical physics.

Landau, L. D, and Lifshitz, E. M. Course of Theoretical Physics Volume 3 - Quantum Mechanics: Non-Relativistic Theory. List of textbooks in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics.

Student physics series. Student physics series) Includes index. The aim of the Student Physics Series is to cover the material. required for a first degree course in physics in a series of concise, clear and readable texts. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except for the quotation of brief passages in criticism.

Quantum Mechanics book. Students find quantum mechanics tough going for two reasons, one conceptual, the other technical. Intuition gained from daily experience is of no help, and can be misleading.

Quantum mechanics is the key to modern physics and chemistry, yet it is notoriously difficult to understand. This book should be of interest to 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students in physics, chemistry and some electrical engineering courses. This book is designed to overcome that obstacle. Clear and concise, it provides an easily readable introduction intended for science undergraduates with no previous knowledge of quantum theory, leading them through to the advanced topics usually encountered at final year level. About the Author: Macquarie University, Australia University of Sussex, UK.

Quantum Mechanics by . Davies (Paperback, 1984). Author:Davies, P. C. W. World of Books Australia was founded in 2005. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Helpful examples and thorough sets of exercises are also given to enable students to master the subject. Clear and concise, it provides an easily readable introduction intended for science undergraduates with no previous knowledge of quantum theory, leading them through to the advanced topics usually encountered at the final year level. Although the subject matter is standard, novel techniques have been employed that considerably simplify the technical presentation.

branch of physics that acts as an abstract framework formulating all the laws of nature. Redirected from Quantum physics). Quantum mechanics is a first quantized quantum theory that supersedes classical mechanics at the atomic and subatomic levels. It is a fundamental branch of physics that provides the underlying mathematical framework for many fields of physics and chemistry.

Quantum mechanics is the key to modern physics and chemistry, yet it is notoriously difficult to understand. This book is designed to overcome that obstacle. Clear and concise, it provides an easily readable introduction intended for science undergraduates with no previous knowledge of quantum theory, leading them through to the advanced topics usually encountered at final year level. Although the subject matter is standard, novel techniques have been employed which considerably simplify the technical presentation. The authors use their extensive experience of teaching and popularizing science to explain the many difficult, abstract points of the subject in easily comprehensible language. Helpful examples and thorough sets of exercises are also given to enable students to master the subject. This book should be of interest to 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students in physics, chemistry and some electrical engineering courses.

Moronydit
Unique approach taken by Paul C. W. Davies and David S. Betts , authors of the book.

The book tends to be terse and requires that the reader use his or her imagination, at least for the first few chapters.

The mathematical treatment is kept to a minimum in the first few chapters but becomes intensive as well as deeper with the progressing chapters. Examples are kept at a level of simplicity to avoid confusing the reader or student. The Schrodinger-oriented wave approach is treated basically throughout the book though more heavily in the first several chapters, whereas the Heisenberg-oriented matrix mechanics approach is treated with some degree of emphasis in the second half of the book. As always, the treatment is kept fairly terse and rigorous but not by any means "overdone" with details or verbose with difficult and profound arguments.

The only problem, if one calls it that, is the relatively conservative approach with fewer diagrams, schematics and pictorial illustrations compared to modern textbooks. Perhaps it reflect the British educational ethos prior to the 21st Century. But since the examples and concepts are so well treated and explained in simple language without "overdoing", due diligence on the part of the reader (or student) can readily make up for any perceived deficiency in illustrations.

All in all - a nice "lean" book to either study (including self-study) or review Quantum Mechanics as most topics are kept as simple as possible in treatment, although I suspect the book was never intended to be a formal textbook or any kind of heavy pedagogical work to impress the uninitiated student or newcomer to the subject, which forms one of the foundations as well as building blocks of modern-day Physics.
cyrexoff
Excellent book, like most QM, you need to fill the blanks between equations.
Mitars Riders
As advertised. No problems.
Alister
I reviewed the manuscript for the first edition of Davies's book for Routledge & Kegan Paul and recommended it fairly enthusiastically. The book was limited, but what it did it did relatively well. It was brief but clear, well-written, did not introduce too much of the usual mythology in discussing 'wave-particle duality' (I liked the discussion of the two-slit experiment), and went on to present the introductory ideas and mathematics of quantum mechanics in an attractive way. I used it in the spring of 1998 to prepare several lectures for my junior-level modern physics class, and recommended that my students read sections of it.
I can not recommend this new edition. At $42.95 the cost is probably about four times that of the original edition. For a book of this size and limitation, a bargain at $10, $40 is ridiculously overpriced. At $42.95 there are too many attractive alternatives.
TheJonnyTest
I have used this textbook at a for upper-division undergraduate quantum mechanics for 2 years.
This book covers the basics and discusses more physics than mathematical tricks. At approximately 100 pages, it still provides excellent discussions on scattering, perturbation theory and symmetry. I would hope that such a text as this one marks the beginning of a shift in physics textbooks - from the overly verbose with reams of algebra and calculus to the essentials - to one which concentraits on physics.
SmEsH
Davies & Betts are to be congratulated on their delightfully concise writing style & wide coverage of all the essentials of Quantum Mechanics, at the advanced undergraduate level. Well done gentlemen!
Agantrius
The one weakness in this book is that it indulges in equations. There are lots and lots of equations in this book. However, in order to organize the material of quantum mechanics in such a terse way, within 192 pages, requires that one substitute equations for discussion. For those who have not had the opportunity to pursue discussion of the why and wherefores of these equations, happily, there is an excellent resource available.

The Transnational College of Lex, of Japan, has an excellent book entitled "What is Quantum Mechanics? A Physics Adventure" which provides the whys and wherefores of these equations. This book is intelligible for anyone without any mathematics or physics background. And it is an excellent supplement to Davies' great book. Although both books belong to different authorship, they were made for each other. I personally did not appreciate Davies' book until I read the aforementioned Japanese book. The mathematics isn't hard. You simply need to be initiated into the hidden tricks and conventions the mathematics community guards the way the fraternity of magicians guard their tricks. There is an excellent analogue between mathematics and magic tricks. Once a trick is explained, its simplicity and trivial nature dawns on you. Similarly, if mathematicians would condescend to the unitiated, and abandon the childish mentality of the fraternal caste, it would be a charming departure from convention to communicate with nonmathematicians. The paucity of solutions in books that provide "answers to selected exercises" does not serve an educational motive, but has an obvious ulterior motive. The Japanese disregard the snobbery and unload all the details. I think that explains their advance beyond Western technological education. Western European culture is degenerating in its educational methods because of the status its Ivy League colleges place on education. "Titles," not "content" seems to be the only significance for obtaining an education today.

To sum up, Paul Davies' book should not be read so much for its lucidity (which it is in parts) but for the aesthetic way in which he organized the material of quantum mechanics and the value this has for posterity.
This is the best QM I have. I would recommend it to any undergraduate student studying this subject. The book is very small and pleasant to read. It's great to use as a complement to a more comercial book like Gasiorowicz's one which I also recommend. It's the most compact book on the subject and the author looses no time with numerical examples. A must have.