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by John Musick,Beverly McMillan
Download The Shark Chronicles: A Scientist Tracks the Consummate Predator fb2
Nature & Ecology
  • Author:
    John Musick,Beverly McMillan
  • ISBN:
    0805073590
  • ISBN13:
    978-0805073591
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Holt Paperbacks (June 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Nature & Ecology
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1310 kb
  • ePUB format
    1756 kb
  • DJVU format
    1431 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    664
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf txt doc


Musick, John A; McMillan, Beverly.

Musick, John A; McMillan, Beverly. New York : Times Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

I'm fascinated by sharks, and so glad I bought this book. It can get slightly bogged down in science for a purely casual reader, but provides a wealth of interesting information all the same.

The Shark Chronicles book. John A. Musick and Beverly McMillan bring us along on a thrilling adventure as they chase sharks from Bear Gulch, Montana, to a whale shark-feeding station in Okinawa, by way of Alaska, the Bimini islands, and the most sophisticated Many animals elicit the same mythical terror and awe as sharks, and yet we know little about these elusive, highly engineered creatures.

The Shark Chronicles: A Scientist Tracks the Consummative Predator by John Musick and Beverly McMillan, 2002- Sharks are frightening, but also awe-inspiring. Along with discussing sharks’ evolution and ecological issues affection them, the authors cover sharks’ special physiology, their reproductive lives, and some of the remarkable things that been discovered in their stomachs.

In real life, if The Shark Chronicles (written with Beverly McMillan) is any guide, the shark scientist’s lot is less predictable though hardly less dramatic. The book, written in the first person singular, is a collection of colourful sketches o. ontinue reading.

A small, fast-swimming predator, the blacknose shark feeds primarily on small, bony fishes, including pinfish, croakers . The Shark Chronicles: A Scientist Tracks the Consummate Predator. p. 157. ISBN 1-55209-629-7.

A small, fast-swimming predator, the blacknose shark feeds primarily on small, bony fishes, including pinfish, croakers, porgies, anchovies, spiny boxfish, and porcupinefish, as well as on octopus and other cephalopods. When competing for bait, their speed allows them to snatch food from larger sharks such as the Caribbean reef shark (C. perezi). This species may form large. May, N. & Willis, C. (2002). Driggers, William; Carlson, John; Cullum, Brian; Dean, John; Oakley, Doug (2004).

Shark eyesight depends on the species, but the fast sharks' eyes are contrast sensitive and some have very good vision, hence where you end and something else begins will decide for them whether they will have a crack at something

Shark eyesight depends on the species, but the fast sharks' eyes are contrast sensitive and some have very good vision, hence where you end and something else begins will decide for them whether they will have a crack at something. Yellow fins look like a separate part from you, so a shark may swoop in on your "trailing escorts" and grab one. Many years ago an underwater photographer had an earlier photo shoot in the day where he and others wore silver-painted wetsuits of the smooth neoprene skin type

amp; McMillan, B. (2003).

amp; McMillan, B. Davidson, A. North Atlantic Seafood: A Comprehensive Guide with Recipes (third e.

â?Hands-down . . . the most entertaining and informative shark book Iâ?ve ever read. Written with insight, humor, and great authority.â? â?Carl Safina, author of Song for the Blue OceanFew animals elicit the same mythical terror as sharks, and yet we know little about these elusive, ancient creatures. Internationally renowned shark researcher John A. Musick and science writer Beverly McMillan bring us along on a thrilling adventure as they track sharks from fossil quarries in Bear Gulch, Montana, to a nurse shark mating lagoon in the Dry Tortugas. By way of Alaska, Japan, the Bimini islands, and the worldâ?s leading shark-research labs, we discover how sharks navigate using electromagnetic signals, have a bloodhoundâ?s sense of smell, are both cold- and warm-blooded, and possess biochemical weapons that someday might help us fend off tumors and microbes.Excavating the secret lives of sharks from the dark recesses of the oceans, this captivating scientific exploration challenges us to rethink our relationship with sharks, leaving us with the question: Are humans the prey, or the predator?

Jwalextell
I'm fascinated by sharks, and so glad I bought this book. It provides an interesting account of sharks and their evolution, and highlights how little we still know of them through first-hand accounts. It can get slightly bogged down in science for a purely casual reader, but provides a wealth of interesting information all the same. It also goes a long way toward dispelling media myths, and recognizing sharks -- with reverence and respect rather than condemnation -- for what they are: apex predators par excellence. Buy this book!
Abuseyourdna
I really enjoyed this book. The authors cover shark evolution, taxonomy, behavior, natural history, biology, exploitation and conservation. They mix accounts of their own research with that of other researchers they visit in various places, including California, Baja California, Florida, and the east coast of the U.S. I took a star away as it didn't include notes, a bibliography, or illustrations of any kind. It did have an appendix with two tables illustrating shark evolution and taxonomy as well as an index.
Flamekiller
The tales of a shark researcher and his colleagues and friends serve as the vehicle for instructing the reader on the fascinating world of the Shark. This narrative trick works in this book much better than I had anticipated, since the vignettes presented quickly depart from the story of the researchers involved and delve into the secrets of the shark they uncovered instead. And the secrets are fascinating. Shark fossils, shark senses, shark sex, shark behavior, shark attack (of course), threats to sharks and surprising data on shark intelligence are all presented in a book that breezes by too quickly. Well worth the price of admission!
Skillet
This book has a ton of great information, is an easy read, and the delivery is enjoyable. If you want to get some basic and advanced information on the past, present, and future of sharks this is the book to read.