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Download Life on a Lost Continent: A Natural History of New Zealand fb2

by Beth Day
Download Life on a Lost Continent: A Natural History of New Zealand fb2
Nature & Ecology
  • Author:
    Beth Day
  • ISBN:
    0385024665
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385024662
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Doubleday (December 1980)
  • Pages:
    128 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Nature & Ecology
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1121 kb
  • ePUB format
    1660 kb
  • DJVU format
    1602 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    134
  • Formats:
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Describes some of the unusual plants and animals native to New Zealand including varieties of flightless birds, a pondless .

Describes some of the unusual plants and animals native to New Zealand including varieties of flightless birds, a pondless frog, the giant kauri pine tree, an. .We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today. To bring the best, most trustworthy information to every internet reader.

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Describes some of the unusual plants and animals native to New Zealand including varieties of flightless birds, a pondless frog, the giant kauri pine tree, and the blooming "Christmas tree. Publication date 01 Dec 1980. Publisher Random House Childrens Books.

New Zealand sits atop a previously unknown continent-mostly submerged beneath the South Pacific-that should be.The scientific value of classifying Zealandia as a continent is much more than just an extra name on a list.

The scientific value of classifying Zealandia as a continent is much more than just an extra name on a list. That a continent can be so submerged yet unfragmented makes it a useful and thought-provoking geodynamic end member in exploring the cohesion and breakup of continental crust.

The island nation of New Zealand may be the tiny chunk of a massive continent that lurks mostly under the . Based on geological definitions of a continent, the Earth actually has a lost eighth continent, known as Zealandia

Based on geological definitions of a continent, the Earth actually has a lost eighth continent, known as Zealandia. Most of this continent is submerged beneath the sea, while a tiny sliver, including New Zealand, is above the water. Earth has eight continents, and world maps should reflect this, geologists say. The eighth, a lost continent called Zealandia, isn't a huge landmass that geographers have somehow missed.

That is in part because the rock beneath New Zealand, by Luyendyk’s calculations, meets the criteria which classify a landmass as a continent. Atlas Pro explains what makes a continent and why the history of the underwater Zealandia makes it a candidate.

Zealandia, a sunken continent long lost beneath the oceans, is giving up its 60.

Zealandia, a sunken continent long lost beneath the oceans, is giving up its 60 million-year-old secrets through scientific ocean drilling," said Jamie Allan, program director in the . National Science Foundation's Division of Ocean Sciences, which supports IODP. Earlier this year, Zealandia was confirmed as Earth's seventh continent, but little is known about it because it's submerged more than a kilometer (two-thirds of a mile) under the sea.

Encompassing all of New Zealand as well as several nearby islands .

Encompassing all of New Zealand as well as several nearby islands, Zealandia likely spent the best of its above-water days as part of the supercontinent Gondwana before fragmenting off of Australia and Antarctica some 80 million years ago. This lost, underwater continent is just beginning to reveal its secrets, making for one of the most promising scientific discoveries of 2017. Want to give some cred to the new eighth continent? It’s 94 percent underwater, but you can still set foot on it by booking passage to New Zealand, New Caledonia (an archipelago that technically belongs to France), and Australia’s Norfolk and Lord Howe islands.

A natural history of New Zealand.