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Nature & Ecology
  • Author:
    Lydia Rosier,Joseph Wood Krutch
  • ISBN:
    0874804809
  • ISBN13:
    978-0874804805
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ of Utah Pr (April 1, 1995)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Nature & Ecology
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1476 kb
  • ePUB format
    1499 kb
  • DJVU format
    1181 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    247
  • Formats:
    txt lrf lit mbr


Joseph Wood Krutch was a popular naturalist/humanist whose writings throughout the early and mid-1900's helped . This is quite simply one of the most important books I have ever read. I had been reading Krutch's nature books one at a time over many years.

Joseph Wood Krutch was a popular naturalist/humanist whose writings throughout the early and mid-1900's helped give Americans a moral compass as they faced wildlife and wilderness areas increasingly under threat of eradication. He wrote at a time society was standing at a crossroads - with blithe destruction of the environment going off in one direction - and increasing awareness of the interconnectedness of the environment reaching off in the other direction. This representative and highly readable collection brings it all together!

Krutch is possibly best k Joseph Wood Krutch (pronounced krootch) was an American writer, critic, and naturalist. He worked as a professor at Columbia University from 1937 to 1953.

Krutch is possibly best k Joseph Wood Krutch (pronounced krootch) was an American writer, critic, and naturalist. Moving to Arizona in 1952, he wrote books about natural issues of ecology, the southwestern desert environment, and the natural history of the Grand Canyon, winning renown as a naturalist and conservationist. Krutch is possibly best known for A Desert Year, which won the John Burroughs Medal in 1954. Books by Joseph Wood Krutch

Joseph Wood Krutch (/kruːtʃ/; November 25, 1893 – May 22, 1970) was an American writer, critic, and naturalist, best known for his nature books on the American Southwest and as a critic of reductionistic science. Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, he was.

Joseph Wood Krutch (/kruːtʃ/; November 25, 1893 – May 22, 1970) was an American writer, critic, and naturalist, best known for his nature books on the American Southwest and as a critic of reductionistic science. Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, he was educated at the University of Tennessee and received a P. in English literature from Columbia University. After serving in the army in 1918, he traveled in Europe for a year with friend Mark Van Doren

Happiness is itself a kind of gratitude. The Best Nature Writing of Joseph Wood Krutch.

Happiness is itself a kind of gratitude. We need some contact with the things we sprang from. We need nature at least as a part of the context of our lives.

The Best Nature Writing of Joseph Wood Krutch (New York: William Morrow . Joseph Wood Krutch came to the desert in his middle years - a man of letters who had spent his entire adult life in the cities an. .

The Best Nature Writing of Joseph Wood Krutch (New York: William Morrow & C. 1969). from the Introduction by Joseph Wood Krutch. In this enduring book, Joseph Wood Krutch has written a series of delightful and wise reflections - one for each month of the year - stemming from thoughts on nature. Joseph Wood Krutch came to the desert in his middle years - a man of letters who had spent his entire adult life in the cities and countryside of the Northeast.

The Best Nature Writing of Joseph Wood Krutch. Joseph Wood Krutch (1967). And Even If You Do: Essays on Man, Manners & Machines. The desert year, Penguin Books, 1977. Self, Science, Nature. 5. The rare moment is not the moment when there is something worth looking at, but the moment when we are capable of seeing. Joseph Wood Krutch (2010). Atheism, Finance, Can Do. 4. An abundance of some good things is perfectly compatible with the scarcity of others; that life is everywhere precarious, man everywhere small. Joseph Wood Krutch (1977). Men, Nature, Scarcity.

by Joseph Wood Krutch. Collection of essays originally published between 1949-1970. Published 1995 by University of Utah Press in Salt Lake City. Natural history, In library, Protected DAISY, Nature. 508. Library of Congress.

Joseph Wood Krutch (; November 25, 1893 – May 22, 1970) was an American writer, critic, and naturalist, best known for his nature books on the American Southwest . The best books of all time by Joseph Wood Krutch. The Measure of Man by Joseph Wood Krutch.

Joseph Wood Krutch (; November 25, 1893 – May 22, 1970) was an American writer, critic, and naturalist, best known for his nature books on the American Southwest and as a critic of reductionistic science. The Measure of Man. - I've read this book. I want to read this book.

Published by New York: William Morrow, 1969. Publication Date: 1969. Book Condition: Fine. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good. Condition: Fine Hardcover. From Peter Keisogloff Rare Books, Inc. (Brecksville, OH, . Price: US$ 2. 0 Convert Currency. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Binding tight, very minor shelf and reading wear, has water damage, all text legible, no sticking pages, staining on edges. usps delivery confirmation included fre with all shipments.

Shakagul
Joseph Wood Krutch was a popular naturalist/humanist whose writings throughout the early and mid-1900's helped give Americans a moral compass as they faced wildlife and wilderness areas increasingly under threat of eradication. He wrote at a time society was standing at a crossroads - with blithe destruction of the environment going off in one direction - and increasing awareness of the interconnectedness of the environment reaching off in the other direction. Krutch helped steer us down the road of saving grace. However, much remains to be done, and Krutch deserves to be re-discovered and widely read again.

The essays in this book, largely from the 1950's and 1960's, do contain a few archaisms that would either be considered politically incorrect now, or that we have a refined understanding of now. For example, Krutch does occasionally refer to tribal people as "primitives." Then he rather haphazardly refers to Europeans as having "inherited" this land from "the red man." The abrasive, old shoot-`em-up movie designation of "red man" aside - Krutch was writing too quickly here to catch the obvious solecism of the word "inherited." Native Americans hardly made a peaceful bequest of the land to Europeans.

Finally, although Krutch certainly would not endorse any Intelligent Design philosophy, he harbors a somewhat outdated, pantheistic animosity against Darwin's Theory as being too mechanical and too insistent upon survival of the fittest through combat "red in tooth and claw." Many naturalists, foremost among them Stephen Jay Gould, have spent pages correcting our impressions on this point. Darwinian survival is now understood to only rarely entail bloody combat. More often, survival is just a matter of the creature with the slight adaptive advantage leaving more offspring. The advantaged creature wins by making love, not war.

However, the archaisms here are minor compared to the overall, urgent wisdom of Krutch's observations. Some of his opinions seem to come right out of today's headlines. In an essay written in 1961, he deplores how our economic system has come to be based on our having to consume more and more resources in order to fuel growth and maintain material prosperity. He writes, "If, for example, people are urged to go into worrisome debt to buy a new automobile, not because they have a need for it, but because automobile workers will be out of a job and lead the way to economic collapse if the unneeded automobiles are not bought - does that not suggest that we've reached a point where men exist for the sake of the industry rather than industry for the sake of man?"

Krutch furthermore points out how our economy's dependence on growth has caused us to help promote an often particularly destructive form of consumerism around the world. He tellingly points out that whereas missionaries used to invade other countries, labeling the natives "pagans" in need of the Bible - now industrialists invade other countries, labeling the natives "undeveloped" and in need of more consumer goods.

His essays contain many other telling analogies and turns of speech. He coins the word "mechanomorphism" to take to task those who are at the other end of the spectrum of "anthropomorphism." Whereas the latter perhaps commit the error of attributing too many human characteristics to animals - the "mechanomorphists" make the more serious error of assigning all creatures only a capacity for mechanical, automatic, instinctually invariant response.

In addition to such stunningly apt insights, Krutch has included many quiet personal appreciations of wildlife among these essays. He talks about the amazing synchronicity he observed between the arrival of the Pronuba moth and the blossoming of the yucca. He tells about the intelligence he witnessed firsthand among the society of mice who found their way into his desert home. (I only wish he had made this essay longer and continued the chronicle of his mouse family.) He makes the reader see some of the beauties of the Grand Canyon anew, and he gives some interesting geologic detail about how that natural wonder was created more through a "rising" of the land than through a cutting down of it.

Krutch is a definitely a man for all seasons whose essential wisdoms have stood the test of time and make for good reading, anywhere - anytime.
Macill
Krutch was an amateur naturalist and a great speaker for the cause of conservation. This is quite simply one of the most important books I have ever read. I had been reading Krutch's nature books one at a time over many years. This representative and highly readable collection brings it all together! Great book.