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by Bill McKibben
Download The End of Nature fb2
Earth Sciences
  • Author:
    Bill McKibben
  • ISBN:
    0812976088
  • ISBN13:
    978-0812976083
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House Trade Paperbacks (June 13, 2006)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Earth Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1481 kb
  • ePUB format
    1434 kb
  • DJVU format
    1275 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    211
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Bill McKibben's The End of Nature deals with humanity's effect on our natural environment the same way that Jonathan Schell's Fate of the Earth presented the harsh facts of the potential nuclear destruction of life

Bill McKibben's The End of Nature deals with humanity's effect on our natural environment the same way that Jonathan Schell's Fate of the Earth presented the harsh facts of the potential nuclear destruction of life. Both books left me better informed, deeply saddened and wondering if the human species has too much natural ability to dominate (each other and our environment) without the wisdom to use such abilities for the promotion of life.

Humanity has stepped across a threshold. In his free-ranging and provocative book, Bill McKibben explores the philosophies and technologies that have brought us here, and he shows how final a crossing we have made. -James Gleick, author of Chaos. Bill McKibben has written several hundred pieces for The New Yorker.

The End of Nature book. McKibben writes of our earth's environmental cataclysm, addressing such core issues as the greenhouse effect, acid rain, and the depletion of the ozone layer. His new introduction addresses some of the latest environmental issues that have risen during the 1990s. The book also includes an invaluable new appendix of facts and figures that surveys the progress of the environmental movement.

The End of Nature is a book written by Bill McKibben, published by Anchor in 1989. It has been called the first book on global warming written for a general audience. McKibben had thought that simply stating the problem would provoke people to action. He describes nature as a force previously independent of human beings but now directly affected by the actions of people.

Bill McKibbon's The End of Nature was first published in 1989. Had I read the book then, my reaction would have been diluted

Bill McKibbon's The End of Nature was first published in 1989. Had I read the book then, my reaction would have been diluted. Instead, after finishing the book in July of 2000, I am stunned by the accuracy of his analysis - especially regarding the inescapable ramifications of human-induced environmental changes and the path being followed by designers and marketers of genetic engineering.

The End of Nature by Bill McKibben (2006, Paperback).

McKibben is] a marvelous writer who has thought deeply about the environment, loves this part of the country, and knows how to be a first-class traveling companion. The End of Nature by Bill McKibben (2006, Paperback).

McKibben argues that our view of nature, its role in our lives and consciousness, has irretrievably altered. The End of Nature" argues passionately that if the world is to survive, we have to rethink this relationship

McKibben argues that our view of nature, its role in our lives and consciousness, has irretrievably altered. The End of Nature" argues passionately that if the world is to survive, we have to rethink this relationship.

His first book, The End of Nature, was published in 1989 by Random House after being serialized in The New Yorker. In 2008 came The Bill McKibben Reader: Pieces from an Active Life, a collection of essays spanning his career.

End of nature Mckibben, Bill Bloomsbury 9780747561866 : Looks at what we are doing to damage nature and what this will .

End of nature Mckibben, Bill Bloomsbury 9780747561866 : Looks at what we are doing to damage nature and what this will mean for our collective futures. This book argues that our view of nature. Now he turns his eye to an array of technologies that could change our relationship not with the rest of nature but with ourselves.

Reissued on the tenth anniversary of its publication, this classic work on our environmental crisis features a new introduction by the author, reviewing both the progress and ground lost in the fight to save the earth.This impassioned plea for radical and life-renewing change is today still considered a groundbreaking work in environmental studies. McKibben's argument that the survival of the globe is dependent on a fundamental, philosophical shift in the way we relate to nature is more relevant than ever. McKibben writes of our earth's environmental cataclysm, addressing such core issues as the greenhouse effect, acid rain, and the depletion of the ozone layer. His new introduction addresses some of the latest environmental issues that have risen during the 1990s. The book also includes an invaluable new appendix of facts and figures that surveys the progress of the environmental movement.More than simply a handbook for survival or a doomsday catalog of scientific prediction, this classic, soulful lament on Nature is required reading for nature enthusiasts, activists, and concerned citizens alike.

Vojar
Bill lays out in no uncertain terms the choice before us. It's not extinction vs permanence, it's accepting limits vs forever managing the planet's life support systems ourselves. I was clearly born to be an engineer and as a teenager told my mother we would one day control the Earth. It would happen gradually, the way my great grandmother had a pace-maker to assist her ailing heart. We'll do the same to nature, gradually replacing its function with our own design. Think genetic engineering, then in its infancy when he wrote this book, now widely practiced in our food production, despite many objections. Bill's not optimistic about our ability to avoid this fate. Neither am I. But if you agree that it's worth trying, even in the face of failure, to preserve the mystery and power of nature, this book may give you some inspiration to keep trying.
Wenes
Mr. McKibben's book demonstrates clearly how humans have rushed headlong into "improving" our mode of living and created massive injury to our homeplace: Earth. Hurricanes, tornadoes, tsunamis larger, more numerous and more destructive than we have ever seen before are showing us - if we are not too blind to see - that we are creating crises with ever-increasing speed. Earthquakes in places we have never seen before, huge oil and sludge spills that are killing our wildlife, destroying .our vegetation, making neighborhoods unlivable in the foreseeable future: all are eloquent signals that we have no choice but to change our thinking and our behavior.

This destruction did not begin in our century. It has merely picked up increasingly more speed as we go. Nature has been reliable in spite of our unreliability toward nature. We've never seen a living passenger pigeon, because it was made extinct by hunters more than a hundred years ago. Our salmon, trying to swim upriver to spawn, are running into dams that stop them. Some of us remember DDT. It was banned in this country decades ago, but we are still living with the consequences, with some birds' eggs with such thin shells that they are crushed before they can be hatched. Soon after WWII pregnant women were giving birth to deformed babies. Many of those babies died.

The time has come to recognize our failing condition and change now.

Mr. McKibben has spoken,eloquently .
Tejora
Very interesting to read and learn about the beginning of our understanding of climate change. Brings the scientific evidence to the forefront whether one chooses to believe or not. Obviously this was written some 25 years ago or so , so our science today is better informed. Still worth the time to read this to understand what all the controversy is about.
Nern
So, I am finally reading The End of Nature; one of my sisters who doesn't even read that much raved and told me to read it. I remember being so impressed by Bill McKibben when he published it (in the New Yorker I think), as he is the same age as me, and I admired such eloquence, scholarship and great writing from someone in their late twenties. And now, finally reading this book, I am thinking, well, I am even more impressed, because I am so struck by how beautiful the writing is in this book, on nature itself, and on man's view or idea of nature. The ideas of separateness, boundaries, limits, and humility, and that these are good things, run through my mind as I read this book. The problems existing in 1989 from global warming make me think that the book was written only recently. Anyway, I recently read Eaarth, Deep Economy, and Enough (another REAL eye-opener for me), and I surely appreciate this man (and his concern, and care, and action, to get us cracking on this big, big problem).
Fecage
Quite a bit "out of date" at this time and a bit depressing though somewhat "optimistic" given present reality as perspective on its original release date. Still, the End of Nature is useful in its comprehensive treatment of the subject and remains what I believe to be an important read.
Kesalard
The book is a bit old, and I didn't always agree with all of McKibbin's philosophies; but 90% of the book's contents, I did agree with (can't argue with unmanipulated facts and statistics), as well as with his ideas and suggestions. The book was quite disconcerting, but TRUTH must be faced, ugly or not. I want to look up some of the 'predictions', which by now must be being fulfilled, or disproved, but I haven't the time, and I actually dread the confirmation, too. I am using this book for reference. It is/will be a big, "I told you so," to those who adhere to the old method of "ignore it and maybe it will go away," when presented with mounting evidence of our very serious environmental circumstance. But, that is little comfort to those of us who are the voices "crying in the wilderness,"--figuratively, and in the not-far-enough-future, likely a physical impossibility as our wildernesses are disappear at such an alarming rate.