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Download Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities fb2

by Mary C. Waters
Download Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities fb2
Earth Sciences
  • Author:
    Mary C. Waters
  • ISBN:
    0674007247
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674007246
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harvard University Press (September 15, 2001)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Earth Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1879 kb
  • ePUB format
    1351 kb
  • DJVU format
    1386 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    921
  • Formats:
    doc rtf mobi azw


Full of rich material, Waters' book is delivered in clean, crisp prose, offering an original argument sure to provoke controversy, even as readers will admire its good sense. An outstanding work, Black Identities will be eagerly read by sociologists, historians, political scientists, and anyone interested in the emerging shape of American ethnic life

West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities. Low wages and poor working conditions are no longer attractive for their children, who use American and not Caribbean standards to measure success.

West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities. Ultimately, the values that gained these first-generation immigrants initial success-a willingness to work hard, a lack of attention to racism, a desire for education, an incentive to save-are undermined by the realities of life in the United States. In many families, the hard-won relative success of the parents is followed by the downward slide of their children.

Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities. Waters, Mary C. (1990). Ethnic Options: Choosing Identities in America. Berkeley, California: University of California Press. p. 57. ISBN 0520070836. Russell Sage Foundation Books at Harvard University Press. Waters, Mary . Levitt, Peggy (2002). The Changing Face of Home: The Transnational Lives of the Second Generation. Russell Sage Foundation Press. e. Perlmann, Joel (2002). The New Race Question: How the Census Counts Multiracial Individuals.

Black Identities book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Black Identities book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Black Identities West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities.

Harvard University Press, 1999. This particularistic culture and unique ways of identity formation help West Indian immigrants adapt to the harsh American realities and negotiate stifling racial relations in the . on their own terms and with relative ease. Black Identities tells an extraordinary story of how West Indian immigrants and their children find themselves in America and struggle to become American. Waters's story of low-skilled adult immigrant workers (chapters 3-5) draws two important lessons for understanding immigrant success.

How could his son know what would be used in the book? Suppose his son said something that was highly unusual and . What kind of a message A P PE NDIX 367 Waters, M. C. (2009). Black identities : west indian immigrant dreams and american realities.

How could his son know what would be used in the book? Suppose his son said something that was highly unusual and it stood out in the book? Ten dollars was nothing to sell all that information that you could not get back. Inheriting the city: The children of immigrants come of age. P Kasinitz, JH Mollenkopf, M Waters, J Holdaway. Harvard University Press, 2001. Russell Sage Foundation Publications, 2009. From many strands: Ethnic and racial groups in contemporary America. S Lieberson, MC Waters. Russell Sage Foundation, 1988. Ethnic and racial identities of second-generation black immigrants in New York City.

Identities : West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities.

Black Identities : West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities. The story of West Indian immigrants to the United States is considered a great success. Many of these adoptive citizens have prospered, including General Colin Powell. But Mary Waters tells a very different story about immigrants from the West Indies, especially their children.

Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities, by Mary Waters. Immigrant America: A Portrait, by Alejandro Portes & Ruben Rumbaut, Citizen . A 50-State Road Trip, by Alexandra Pelosi. The Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan. My Underground American Dream, by Julissa Arce. Juarez: The Laboratory of our Future, by Charles Bowden. How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America, by Moustafa Bayoumi. Strangers from a Different Shore, by Ronald Takaki

The story of West Indian immigrants to the United States is considered a great success. Many of these adoptive citizens have prospered, including General Colin Powell. But Mary Waters tells a very different story about immigrants from the West Indies, especially their children.

She finds that when the immigrants first arrive, their knowledge of English, their skills and contacts, their self-respect, and their optimistic assessment of American race relations facilitate their integration into the American economic structure. Over time, however, the realities of American race relations begin to swamp their positive cultural values. Persistent, blatant racial discrimination soon undermines the openness to whites the immigrants have when they first arrive. Discrimination in housing channels them into neighborhoods with inadequate city services and high crime rates. Inferior public schools undermine their hopes for their children's future. Low wages and poor working conditions are no longer attractive for their children, who use American and not Caribbean standards to measure success.

Ultimately, the values that gained these first-generation immigrants initial success--a willingness to work hard, a lack of attention to racism, a desire for education, an incentive to save--are undermined by the realities of life in the United States. In many families, the hard-won relative success of the parents is followed by the downward slide of their children. Contrary to long-held beliefs, Waters finds, those who resist Americanization are most likely to succeed economically, especially in the second generation.


Hiclerlsi
A well-recommended sociological study about an immigrant community, how the members differ from the surrounding population, and how they differ from each other.
Jozrone
Great book! Some of the info is starting to become outdated but the information is all very relevant. - wonderful read for understanding the ethnic landscape in the US.
Tygolar
This was a required text for a class I took. The class was Sociology of Immigration, outstanding professor. Books like this should be standard reading in High School.
Fawrindhga
Arrived in great condition!
JUST DO IT
Interesting read on the experiences of black and immigrant experiences. Waters outlines the experiences of the blacks both immigrants and US-born with whites in the US.
Diab
Great book
Ese
I have used this book to provide students with an introduction to the West Indian population. It is a very easy read.
This book, which I read as part of a sociology course, awoke me to the struggles of people who I would have never thought about otherwise. I recommend this one.