» » Contesting Space in Colonial Singapore: Power Relations and the Urban Built Environment

Download Contesting Space in Colonial Singapore: Power Relations and the Urban Built Environment fb2

by Brenda S.A. Yeoh
Download Contesting Space in Colonial Singapore: Power Relations and the Urban Built Environment fb2
Earth Sciences
  • Author:
    Brenda S.A. Yeoh
  • ISBN:
    9971692686
  • ISBN13:
    978-9971692681
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Singapore University Press (January 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    380 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Earth Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1690 kb
  • ePUB format
    1430 kb
  • DJVU format
    1164 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    951
  • Formats:
    lrf docx lit txt


In the British colonial city of Singapore, municipal authorities and Asian . Yeoh is Professor at the Department of Geography, National University of Singapore.

In the British colonial city of Singapore, municipal authorities and Asian communities faced off over numerous issue. As the city expanded, disputes arose in connection with sanitation, housing, street names, control over pedestrian 'five-foot-ways', and sacred spaces such as burial grounds.

Contesting Space book. Contesting Space: Power Relations and the Urban Built Environment in Colonial Singapore. Brenda Yeoh's CONTESTING SPACE IN COLONIAL SINGAPORE is a beautifully rendered, intricately detailed analytic narrative of exactly this dance and tension in the construction of Singapore, a most unusual colonial city in that it was built as a trading entrepôt and strategic military site, rather than (like most other colonial cities) primarily as a site for the direct exploitation of an indigenous. Chapter 1: Power Relations and the Built Environment in Colonial Cities. As the city expanded, disputes arose in connection with sanitation, housing, street names, control over pedestrian five-foot-ways, and sacred spaces such as burial grounds. Brenda Yeoh’s Contesting Space in Colonial Singapore details these conflicts and how they shaped the city. Chapter 2: Establishing an Institution of Control over the Urban Built Environment: The Municipal Authority of Singapore, 1819-1930.

Urban Built Environment by Brenda .

Brenda Yeoh's Contesting Space in Colonial Singapore details these conflicts and how they shaped the city

ISBN13:9789971692681.

Contesting space in colonial Singapore: Power relations and the urban built environment. Globalising Singapore: debating transnational flows in the city. Urban Studies 38 (7), 1025-1044, 2001. Cosmopolitanism and its exclusions in Singapore. Urban Studies 41 (12), 2431-2445, 2004. Opening the black box of migration: Brokers, the organization of transnational mobility and the changing political economy in Asia. J Lindquist, B Xiang, BSA Yeoh. Pacific Affairs 85 (1), 7-19, 2012.

Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press, 1996. Pp. xxiv, 351. Figures, Plates, Index. Recommend this journal. The University of Hong Kong. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 24 August 2009. Export citation Request permission.

Get started today for free.

In the British colonial city of Singapore, municipal authorities and Asian communities faced off over numerous issue By Brenda S. A. Yeoh. For the Asian communities, Singapore was the place where they lived according to their own values, priorities and resources. By Brenda S.

This book considers the remarkable transformations that have taken place in India since 1980, a period that began with the . Contesting Space in Colonial Singapore: Power Relations and the Urban Built Environment.

This book considers the remarkable transformations that have taken place in India since 1980, a period that began with the assassination of the formidable Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. Her death, and that of her son Rajiv seven years later, marked the end of the Nehru-Gandhi era. Although the country remains one of the few democracies in the developing world, many of the policies instigated by these earlier regimes have been swept away to make room for dramatic alterations in the political, economic and social landscape.

In the British colonial city of Singapore, municipal authorities and Asian communities faced off over numerous issue. As the city expanded, disputes arose in connection with sanitation, housing, street names, control over pedestrian 'five-foot-ways', and sacred spaces such as burial grounds. Brenda Yeoh's Contesting Space in Colonial Singapore details these conflicts and how they shaped the city. The British administration structured the private and public environments of the city with an eye toward shaping human behaviour, following scientific principles and the lessons of urban planning in other parts of the world. For the Asian communities, Singapore was the place where they lived according to their own values, priorities and resources. The two perceptions of the city frequently clashed, and the author reads the cityscape of Singapore as the result of this contest between discipline and resistance. Drawing on meticulous research and a theoretically sophisticated use of cultural and social geography, post-colonial historical discourse, and social theory, the author offers a compelling picture of a critical stage in Singapore's past. It is an important contribution to the study of colonial cities and an indispensable resource for understanding the shape of modern Singapore.