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by Bjorn Kurten,Elaine Anderson
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Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    Bjorn Kurten,Elaine Anderson
  • ISBN:
    0231037333
  • ISBN13:
    978-0231037334
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Columbia University Press; 1st Edition. edition (October 15, 1980)
  • Pages:
    442 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1121 kb
  • ePUB format
    1222 kb
  • DJVU format
    1418 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    611
  • Formats:
    txt azw azw lit


From the book jacket: "Here is the long-awaited guide to the Blancan and Pleistocene mammal species of North America. If you are serious at all on the mammals of Pleistocene North America, whether extinct or still with us, then you have to purchase this book.

From the book jacket: "Here is the long-awaited guide to the Blancan and Pleistocene mammal species of North America. Illustrated with maps and tables, faunal restorations, and line drawings of teeth, skulls, and limb bones, "Pleistocene Mammals of North America" provides a coherent picture of the origin, evolution, and distribution of North American mammals in the period from 3,000,000 to 8,000 years before the present.

Pleistocene Mammals of Europe. How to Deep Freeze a Mammoth. Not from the Apes: A History of Man's Origin and Evolution. On Evolution and Fossil Mammals.

Björn Kurtén, Elaine Anderson. Björn Olof Lennartson Kurtén (1924–1988) was a distinguished vertebrate paleontologist. He belonged to the Swedish-speaking minority in Finland. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. He was a professor in paleontology at the University of Helsinki from 1972 up to his death in 1988. He also spent a year as lecturing guest professor at Harvard University in 1971.

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Items related to Pleistocene Mammals of North America. Bjorn Kurten; Elaine Anderson Pleistocene Mammals of North America. ISBN 13: 9780231037334. Pleistocene Mammals of North America. Bjorn Kurten; Elaine Anderson.

Ruth Kurten Bjorn Kurten; Elaine Anderson. OK, we had to get that out of the way because Kurtén and Anderson's Pleistocene Mammals of North America was published in 1980, when there were still assumed to be four glacial cycles in the Pleistocene. Thus, fossil faunas are often described as (for example) "Sangamonan" or "Illinoian". But they are usually also described by the NALMA, which is still useful. The book is organized first by NALMA period - listing Blancan, then Irvingtonian, then Rancholabrean sites by state and province, describing what's been found at each location.

Pleistocene Mammals of North America. Bjorn Kurten, Elaine Anderson. Pleistocene Mammals of Europe.

Are you sure you want to remove Pleistocene mammals of North America from your list? Pleistocene mammals of North America. Published 1980 by Columbia University Press in New York, USA.

From the book jacket: "Here is the long-awaited guide to the Blancan and Pleistocene mammal species of North America. Illustrated with maps and tables, faunal restorations, and line drawings of teeth, skulls, and limb bones, "Pleistocene Mammals of North America" provides a coherent picture of the origin, evolution, and distribution of North American mammals in the period from 3,000,000 to 8,000 years before the present."

AGAD
Book as stated
Son is thrilled with it.
Άνουβις
If you are serious at all on the mammals of Pleistocene North America, whether extinct or still with us, then you have to purchase this book. A great resource, it exhaustively and authoritatively chronicles all known mammals preserved as fossils from that period of earth's history. In addition to the well known megafauna such as mammoths, mastodons, dire wolves, ground sloths, and giant bison, Kurten and Anderson detail animals nearly always ignored in popular works, such as rodents, bats, and insectivores.
The book begins with a thorough listing of all known sites of Blancan, Irvingtonian, and Rancholabrean faunas throught the United States and Canada, with each site sorted by state or province, its location noted on a map (and in detail in the text), and notes included on general nature of the site, species recovered there, and often notes on its general importance. Nice black and white illustrations of some of the faunas are interspersed in this section of the tome.
The bulk of the book though is the exhaustive listing of fossil mammals, each chapter organized around a particular order, and the chapter subdivided by family. Each species has common, alternate common, genus, species, and alternate (and no longer valid) genus and species names (such as in the case with the Jefferson's Mammoth, Mammuthus jeffersoni; it has also been called the Columbian Mammoth and the Imperial Mammoth, and seven other scientific names have been ascribed to it).
Entries vary in the detail to which the species is described, though many are given several paragraphs devoted to description, life habits, and speculation as to the reason for extinction. Black and white illustrations of fossils are included in each chapter, and a small number of extinct mammals are shown as how they appeared in life. Occasional maps illustrate sites of major finds.
Though not really a book one can sit down in a nice chair and read, it is interesting to flip through. Though more of a scholarly resource, it gives one pause to consider just how many mammals are no longer present on this continent. North America not only had the infamous "sabretooth," the dire wolf, the mastodon, mammoths, tank-like glyptodonts, and the exotic ground sloth, but it once had scores of camels and llamas, a bewildering variety of horses, as well as giant beavers, yaks, cheetah, giant marmots, and possibly even pandas.
Kazracage
As one fascinated by the Ice Age, especially vanished megafauna, I looked for a long time for a comprehensive book on vanished Ice Age animals of North America. This is it.
The treatise is exhaustive in terms of what was known up to the publishing date. If it is read carefully, it will impart a knowledge of these interesting animals and also give the reader an excellent backgound on the Pleistocene ice advances. The authors' discussion regarding the breakdown of time periods is excellent.
Even though the passage of time and new findings, particularly in Florida, have lessened the value of some of the data presented, the book remains a peerless review of a dynamic part of Earth's history.
Caveat: The reader should have some background in zoology and anatomy, otherwise constant recourse to a dictionary may be required.
Quynaus
This book has the most information that a paleontologist can find about North American mammals in one place. It is an exhaustive text book chock full of facts about all the mammals from that continent that have lived in the last 3 million years. As a layman interested in paleontology I found the book fascinating and easy to read. The book is seperated into two main parts: first chronology of faunas, and then than a discusion of all the orders of mammals , species by species. The book also discusses possible reasons for extinction. The only flaw in the book are some of the reasons given for extinction are contradictary. For example the extinction for the giant beaver was supposedly caused by competition with the modern day beaver, yet they coexisted for 2 million years, and the dental patterns suggest that they didn't have the same habits. Modern day beavers probably even created habitat that was favourable to prehistoric giant beavers.