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by Patricia G. Parker,Nancy Tyler Burley
Download Avian Reproductive Tactics: Female and Male Perspectives (OM49) fb2
Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    Patricia G. Parker,Nancy Tyler Burley
  • ISBN:
    093586895X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0935868951
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    American Ornithologists' Union (January 1, 1998)
  • Pages:
    195 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1132 kb
  • ePUB format
    1800 kb
  • DJVU format
    1268 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    180
  • Formats:
    doc mbr mobi docx


reproductive tactics: female and male perspectives.

1. and Kristine Johnson. female-only care, and male reproductive tactics to maxim-. ize offspring numbers re-emerged. reproductive tactics: female and male perspectives. logical Monographs no. 49 (ed. P. G. Parker & N. T. Burley), pp. 1–20. Washington, DC: American Ornithol

Ornithological monographs ; no. 49. Bibliography, et. Includes bibliographical references.

Ornithological monographs ; no. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references. Personal Name: Parker, Patricia G. Personal Name: Burley, Nancy. Rubrics: Birds Reproduction Behavior.

Male–male competition, female choice, and sexual conflict are likely the main evolutionary forces that have shaped .

Male–male competition, female choice, and sexual conflict are likely the main evolutionary forces that have shaped male genital traits (Eberhard 1985, Hosken and Stockley 2004, Arnqvist and Rowe 2005). Brown and Brown 2003; Cornwallis and Birkhead 2007, 2008; Immler et al. 2009) and many other groups.

Download books for free. Mobile version (beta).

Nancy Tyler Burley, Patricia G Parker. In P. E. D. Ketterson, P. Parker, +3 authors C. R. Chandler. Parker and N. Burley (ed., Avian reproductive tactics: Female and male perspectives, pp. 81–101. Sexual Selection in Primates: Sex roles, contests for the control of reproduction, and sexual selection. Patricia Adair Gowaty. Allen Press, Lawrence, KS. 1998.

Increased vigilance in male animals has been attributed to mate guarding (male investment hypothesis), to secondary .

Increased vigilance in male animals has been attributed to mate guarding (male investment hypothesis), to secondary sexual characteristics increasing predation risk (male constraint hypothesis) o. .In: Parker PG, Burley NT (eds) Avian reproductive tactics: female and male perspectives, Ornithological monographs, no. American Ornithological Union, Washington, DC, pp 103–123Google Scholar. Thomas VG, Popko R (1981) Fat and protein reserves of wintering and prebreeding rock ptarmigan from south Hudson Bay.

The content of this book is more graphic than Nancy Friday's other books. What I like most about the book is the psychological interpretations of various men's fantasies

The content of this book is more graphic than Nancy Friday's other books. Some of the fantasies are extremely graphic and some might say rather unusual. In other words, you are going to read about some unusual practices and kinks. On the other hand, it captures the nature of the male's fascination for highly visual, genitally stimulating and sometimes extreme sexual practices. What I like most about the book is the psychological interpretations of various men's fantasies. While I don't necessarily agree with Nancy Friday's line of thought some of the time, her interpretations are creative and in most cases plausible.

Alternative reproductive tactics in male Cape ground squirrels Xerus . Alternative Reproductive Tactics.

Alternative reproductive tactics in male Cape ground squirrels Xerus inauris. Physiology & Behavior, Vol. 94, Issue. Alternative reproductive tactics in male mammals fall into two categories: unequal pay-offs, in which a younger or subordinate individual assumes a lower fitness tactic in response to the frequency and competitive ability of other males in the population, and equal pay-offs, in which ecological or environmental factors dictate alternative tactics based on distribution of resources, population density, and demographic conditions.

Most birds have simple genitalia; males lack external genitalia and females have . Avian Reproductive Tactics: Female and Male Perspectives. Pagel M (1999) The maximum likelihood approach to reconstructing ancestral characters on phylogenies. Syst Biol 48: 612–622.

Most birds have simple genitalia; males lack external genitalia and females have simple vaginas. However, male waterfowl have a phallus whose length (. – 40 cm) and morphological elaborations vary among species and are positively correlated with the frequency of forced extra-pair copulations among waterfowl species. American Ornithologist Union.

In P. 61–80. The American Ornithologists’ Union, Washington, . Griffith, S. I. F. Owens, and K. A. Thuman.