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by Arturo Kirkconnell,Roman F. Company,Orlando H. Garrido
Download Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba (Comstock Books) fb2
Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    Arturo Kirkconnell,Roman F. Company,Orlando H. Garrido
  • ISBN:
    0801486319
  • ISBN13:
    978-0801486319
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Comstock Publishing Associates; 1 edition (August 3, 2000)
  • Pages:
    376 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1117 kb
  • ePUB format
    1960 kb
  • DJVU format
    1700 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    133
  • Formats:
    txt mbr doc docx


The first book entirely devoted to Cuba's birds to appear in eighty years, Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba is. .

The first book entirely devoted to Cuba's birds to appear in eighty years, Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba is a serious work in the tradition of Don Ramón de la Sagra, Johannes Gundlach and Thomas Barbour. Based on their lifetimes of work in their native country, Orlando Garrido and Arturo Kirkconnell have crafted a truly complete, self-contained guide that will be essential to all those seeking to enjoy Cuba's exciting birdlife. ―James W. Wiley, Leader of the Grambling Cooperative Wildlife Project, Grambling State University.

Checklists of endemic species and subspecies. Background on the geography, climate, geology, paleontology, and natural history of Cuba  .

The 21 living endemic species include the charming Cuban Tody, the striking and elegant Cuban Trogon (the national bird), the colorful Cuban Green Woodpecker, and the smallest of all birds, the Bee Hummingbird

Orlando H. Garrido is a founder of both the Cuban Academy of Science and the National Museum of Natural History of Cuba, where he served as Curator until his retirement. Orlando H.

After being pressured into an arranged marriage to merge their families' companies, Talia and Tobias are stuck living together as husband and wife

Read Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba PDF by Orlando H. Garrido Comstock Publishing Associates Listen to Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba (Comstock Books) au.After being pressured into an arranged marriage to merge their families' companies, Talia and Tobias are stuck living together as husband and wife. Although they are both unhappy, neither tries to make the best of it. Tobias is too busy, and Talia is too distraught by the tragic death of her former fianceé, Jason. But as time goes by and they spend more time together, an undeniable attraction develops between the two.

Orlando H. Garrido, Arturo Kirkconnell, Lester L. Short. The 21 living endemic species include the charming Cuban Tody, the striking and elegant Cuban Trogon (the national bird), the colorful Cuban Green Woodpecker, and the smallest of all birds, the Bee Hummingbird. This compact and portable field reference will help Cubans, visitors from abroad, and bird enthusiasts identify and enjoy the island's avifauna

By Orlando H. Garrido and. Arturo Kirkconnell. Aves de Cuba is a translation of the Field Guide.

By Orlando H. Illustrations by Roma´n Com-. pan˜ y. Foreword by John W. Fitzpatrick. Publishing Associates, Ithaca, New York, USA. 2011: 287 pages, 51 color plates, 1 figure, range. to the Birds of Cuba published by the same. I am not qualified to evaluate the. The first book entirely devoted to Cuba's birds to appear in eighty years, Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba is a serious work in the tradition of Don Ramón de la Sagra, Johannes Gundlach and Thomas Barbour.

Booktopia has Birds of Australia, A Photographic Guide by Iain Campbell.

Bird Guides Field Guide Guide Book Travel Books Cuba Orlando Travel Writing Books Kobe Orlando Florida. Booktopia has Birds of Australia, A Photographic Guide by Iain Campbell. Waitaki District Libraries catalog Details for: Birds of Australia. Mind over chatter since 1905.

Find nearly any book by Orlando H. Garrido. by Orlando H. Garrido, Arturo Kirkconnell

Find nearly any book by Orlando H. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Garrido, Arturo Kirkconnell. ISBN 9780801476914 (978-0-8014-7691-4) Softcover, Comstock Pub. Associates, 2011.

The richness and diversity of Cuban birdlife features 354 recorded species that represent 20 orders and 60 families. The 21 living endemic species include the charming Cuban Tody, the striking and elegant Cuban Trogon (the national bird), the colorful Cuban Green Woodpecker, and the smallest of all birds, the Bee Hummingbird.This compact and portable field reference will help Cubans, visitors from abroad, and bird enthusiasts identify and enjoy the island's avifauna. The 51 color plates and 662 images accurately illustrate male, female, and juvenile plumages (in some cases for the first time). Many migratory species are depicted in both winter and breeding colors, providing a glimpse of many common North American birds as they appear when away from northern surroundings. In the comprehensive Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba Orlando H. Garrido and Arturo Kirkconnell share their vast wealth of knowledge about birds―and habitats―that are too little known.Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba contains:* Species accounts including habitat descriptions, similar species, range, status, nesting and feeding habits, and vocalizations.* Checklists of endemic species and subspecies.* Background on the geography, climate, geology, paleontology, and natural history of Cuba.*144 maps that show regional boundaries and vegetative habitats as well as the local distribution of each species.

Shakar
This has to be the worst organized field guide that I own...and I own dozens. It is so poorly organized that I'm not even sure I'll take it to Cuba, I may take the far superior Nils Navarro "Endemic Birds of Cuba" plus the Field Guide to Birds of the West Indies. If I do end up carrying it, I will probably just use it for reference at night, but in the field I think it will be useless.

Where to start:
1) the plates have no call back to the text. So in order to look up any information on the bird, after potentially identifying it from the plate, you must page back to the index to find out what page the text is on.
2) the index itself is poorly organized, with birds listed as sub-names under a header, (i.e, you might look on a page and there is the name "Cuban." But Cuban what? So you have to page up to find...oh, Vireo. On top of that, Spanish and latin names are listed under the same header so it may take quite awhile to even figure out what the name is referring back to.
3) The plate numbers are squashed in the far bottom corner of the opposing page to the actual plate, so close to the binding that they are almost impossible to see.
4) The name of the bird is not even on the actual plate but on a facing page, under a pale black and white image of the bird. A waste of space and I don't see a point to this.

All of these factors make the book extremely inefficient. When in the field, you want to be able to quickly find your bird and any textual information.

However, the pros of the book are its detailed information on habitat, range, voice, etc. with good range maps. No other current guide has this much textual information (the Navarro book does, but it only covers a subset of the birds in this guide--Endemics and West Indian specialties.)

Another option, if one really wants to use this guide, is to go through it and write in the page numbers for each bird on every plate. I'm not sure if I want to bother with this tedious task, but I think its the only way to make this book useful as a field guide. Hopefully in the next edition the editors will take heed!
Jieylau
We bought this guide to take with us to Cuba. The plates and text are good enough but the plates lack a direct correlation to the text descriptions so you have to search through the text to find the plate number in the text and parse through all of the descriptions of birds on the plate (typically 6 or so birds). It works, but is a bit inconvenient. The guide appears to list every bird ever seen in Cuba (at least in the "modern age"). Quite a few of the listed birds have been sited only a single time in Cuba and decades ago! It makes sifting through the possible matches a bit tedious. All of that said, these are all things I could easily live with. The worst thing about this guide, and the real reason I took off three stars, is the very poor quality. Both covers were curled within minutes (made of cheap, thin cardboard) and pages started falling out as soon as we arrived in Cuba (a week after purchasing it). I ended up leaving it in Cuba with the family we were staying with or I would have returned it to Amazon. Our guide had an older Spanish-language version and it was of much better quality.
Syleazahad
This book includes all the birds ever seen in Cuba, which makes it way too big for a field guide. The authors should have left out pictures of accidentals and rareties and just included a mention of them in the text. That said, the illustrations are beautiful but the range maps aren't beside the pictures, unlike our modern North American field guides. This makes it awkward to use. Extensive information is provided about each species, including habitat and nesting, and useful comparisons with similar species. I am enjoying studying this book in preparation for my trip to the island this winter.
Lost Python
The Field Guide to The Birds of Cuba published by Cornell University Press is as disappointing as the Birds of Ecuador published by the same. You would think that anything associated with birds and Cornell would be the ultimate bird field guide but for me it is not. The guide is 253 pages 60% of the pages in the Birds of Costa Rica which should be the format that all current field guides should follow. The Birds of Cuba weights 1.5 pounds and to big to fit in the pocket of cargo pants and too heavy to carry afield. It weights 1/2 pound more than the Birds of Costa Rica which covers 3X more birds. The biggest thing I do not like is that all of the plates are in the middle and instead of having the having the name with the bird picture there is a grayscale mirror image of the picture on the left side with the name on it. So there is a constant looking back and forth to see that bird name is associated with the picture. The catch to the whole thing is that those wanting a book specific to Cuba birds there is not another choice. Jerry Wayne Davis
Xmatarryto
I would rather have guide book describe the bird and show the picture ALL on the same page. In this book you can not do that. The description does have what page to look for the photo but the photo doesn't give the page that the description can be found.
Quynaus
This field guide is very well done as far as photos and information is concerned. However, it is not particularly convenient to use as the format required flipping back and forth, plus there is no page reference on the bird photos meaning you have to go to the index to follow through. Another negative is its weight ... too heavy to carry. My birding trip to Cuba is coming up soon and I expect this will be more useful after the fact than before.
mIni-Like
Giving 4 star because of the strange layout. The drawings (plates) are in the middle with the descriptions in the first quarter and last quarter of the book. You have to refer to the page number of the plate from the description. Would have been easier if the plate would also refer back to the page number of the description. Strange format but once you figure it out it covers most of the bases a good bird book should.