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by Gary Haynes
Download Mammoths, Mastodonts, and Elephants: Biology, Behavior and the Fossil Record fb2
Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    Gary Haynes
  • ISBN:
    0521384354
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521384353
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (September 27, 1991)
  • Pages:
    424 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1809 kb
  • ePUB format
    1355 kb
  • DJVU format
    1237 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    591
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Haynes believes that climatic warming as the ice sheets retreated stressed the mastodont and mammoth populations and caused progressive reductions in their ranges.

Articles on more topical matters are interspersed within the text and dis- cuss, for example, El Nifio and the Southern. Haynes believes that climatic warming as the ice sheets retreated stressed the mastodont and mammoth populations and caused progressive reductions in their ranges. Hunting may have exacerbated the situation, but he does not believe that it was the major, or even a signifi- cant contributor, tcrtheir extinction. lt;/p

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes. T2 - Mammoths, mastodonts, and elephants-biology, behavior, and the fossil record. AU - Graham, Russell W. Py - 1993/6/8. url?scp 84954942357&partnerID 8YFLogxK. U2 - 1. 080/02724634.

Mammoths, Mastodonts, and Elephants book. The importance of this book is primarily its unifying perspective on living and extinct proboscideans: the fossil record is closely examined and compared to the natural history of surviving elephants. Dr. Haynes's studies of the places where African elephants die (so-called elephant burial grounds) are unique.

The purpose of this book is to use the ecology and behavior of modern elephants to create models for . The implications of these similarities on the life and death of mammoths and mastodonts is explored in detail.

The purpose of this book is to use the ecology and behavior of modern elephants to create models for reconstructing the life and death of extinct mammoths and mastodonts. The source of the models is a long-term and continuing study of elephants in Zimbabwe, Africa.

Haynes's observations on behavior and mortality of African elephants under different conditions of environmental .

Haynes's observations on behavior and mortality of African elephants under different conditions of environmental stress, collected with the fossil record in mind, are a unique and extremely valuable contribution. American Anthropology. Haynes examines a lot of of 'evidence' and shows that there are in fact a lot of different 'interpretations' that may be used for the same fossil evidence, and most of them do not involve humans. As such, Haynes does quite a good job, however, he does not usefully address two fundamental points, which together, are perhaps the MOST supportive of the 'overkill' theory. The first point involves 'economics' (surprisingly enough).

Mammoths, Mastodonts, and Elephants: Biology, Behavior and the Fossil Record . an enthralling book which anyone interested in elephants or mammoths will enjoy.

Mammoths, Mastodonts, and Elephants: Biology, Behavior and the Fossil Record (Paperback). Gary Haynes (author). The purpose of this book is to examine the ecology and behaviour of modern elephants to create models for reconstructing the lives and deaths of extinct mammoths and mastodons. The sources for these models are long-term continuing studies of elephants in Zimbabwe, Africa an enthralling book which anyone interested in elephants or mammoths will enjoy. The Times Higher Education Supplement 'The scholarly title obscures the real topic. In fact, this volume is a brilliant murder mystery.

Mammoths, mastodonts, and. elephants: biology, behavior, and the fossil. Cambridge: Cambridge University. Furthermore, their disappearance has been interpreted as the direct cause of technological changes in the elaboration of lithic tools ( Ben-Dor et a. 2011).

New Biological Books. Mammoths, Mastodonts, and Elephants: Biology, Behavior, and the Fossil Record. The structure of the Lower Pleistocene archaeological record: A case study from the Koobi Fora formation. N Stern, HT Bunn, EM Kroll, G Haynes, S McBrearty, J Sept,. Cambridge University Press, 1993. A guide for differentiating mammalian carnivore taxa responsible for gnaw damage to herbivore limb bones. Paleobiology 9 (2), 164-172, 1983. Current Anthropology 34 (3), 201-225, 1993. Longitudinal studies of African elephant death and bone deposits. Journal of Archaeological science 15 (2), 131-157, 1988.

Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Mammoths, mastodonts, & elephants. Biology, behavior, and fossil records" by Paul G. Bahn. Population structure in straight-tusked elephants : a case study from Neumark Nord 1 ( late Middle Pleistocene ?, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany ). Federica, Margareta Rita, Francesco Marano.

The diminishing population of African and Asian elephants can be compared to the extinction of other elephant-like species, such as mammoths and mastodonts, which occurred more than ten thousand years ago. The purpose of this book is to use the ecology and behavior of modern elephants to create models for reconstructing the life and death of extinct mammoths and mastodonts. The source of the models is a long-term and continuing study of elephants in Zimbabwe, Africa. These models are clearly described with respect to the anatomical, behavioral, and ecological similarities between past and present proboscideans. The implications of these similarities on the life and death of mammoths and mastodonts is explored in detail. The importance of this book is primarily its unifying perspective on living and extinct proboscideans: the fossil record is closely examined and compared to the natural history of surviving elephants. Dr. Haynes's studies of the places where African elephants die (so-called elephant burial grounds) are unique.

Yanthyr
This is a well-researched book that is a refutation of the 'overkill' theory of Pleistocene megafauna extinction, as pressed by Martin and others. Haynes examines a lot of of 'evidence' and shows that there are in fact a lot of different 'interpretations' that may be used for the same fossil evidence, and most of them do not involve humans. As such, Haynes does quite a good job, however, he does not usefully address two fundamental points, which together, are perhaps the MOST supportive of the 'overkill' theory. The first point involves 'economics' (surprisingly enough). When examine the so-called 'Clovis' and 'Solutrean' peoples (which in fact refers to a tool kit, not 'a people'), these are characterized by two things, the first of which are the very large stone tips for atlatl darts, and the second is that no OTHER kinds of stone tips are found at such sites. Both Clovis and Solutrean stone tips are often found stored in 'caches,' where presumably the hunters would retrieve them as necessary, but for one reason or another did not do so. These are the ONLY such atlatl dart points or spear points to be 'stored' in such a manner, and of course, there is really only one reason for this to be the case. Because these points are so large and heavy (7" long, in some cases), carrying an arsenal of these around, or worse, a large enough 'core stone' to make more would have been a terrible burden to lug around, and so, they would be manufactured, and then stored, sometimes hundreds of miles away from the original source stone, and this is NEVER the case with any other points subsequently or previously used for huntng (Acheulian, Folsom, etc). Thus, the fact that ONLY Clovis points or Solutrian points are ever found in any location, this can only mean ONE thing, and that is these hunters were absolutely concentrating on the very largest game they could find, and that means 'megafauna,' to the virtual exclusion of all else. yes, these hunters DID take other things like horses and camels on occasion, but that seems to indicate a simple 'lack of available mammoths,' rather than by intent or by equipment, because such a large atlatl point for a horse or camel, or even bison is very much a case of 'overkill,' which is WHY such points immediately and significantly diminished in size as soon as the megafauna went extinct, and no more do you find 'caches' of spearpoints (because it simply was no longer necessary). In other words, there is no point lugging around an elephant gun, if there are no elephants, and all you expect to come across are deer.
The second point Haynes pointedly avoids, is the fact that megafauna extinctions didn't happen all over the world at the same time, but began in Africa 50,000 BP, spread through Europe, and across Asia, and finally appears in North and South America at about 13,000 BP, in virtually the same sequence and time frames as did human expansion, and there is no 'coincidence' about it. I said 'virtually,' because there IS a small apparent discrepancy regarding North America, because best evidence now shows that humans were in fact in North and South America for several thousands of years BEFORE megafauna extinctions suddenly appear, and the reasons for this 'delay' appear to be two-fold. the first is that the earliest arrivals in teh 'New World' appear to have lived along the West Coast and were concentrated on living a coastal life, eating fish, shellfish, kelp, whales, seals, etc. Only much later did they begin to penetrate into the interior where regular contact with megafauna could be expected. Concurrent with that was a critical 'invention,' the Clovis point, which changed the whole balance in terms of predator and prey, and ALLOWED these early hunters the oportunity to pretty much slay anything at will, which was not the case previously. it wasn't as if they hadn't TRIED before, they just weren't very successful at it. The best example of this is a fossilized mastodon scapula from the Pacific Northwest from about 15,000BP, which had been speared with an ivory point. It had partially penetrated the scapula, but snapped off, leaving the tip of the point embedded, which subsequently had bone grow around it as the Mastodon healed from this (obviously) unsuccessful attack, thus indicating 'the right tool for the right job' had simply not yet been invented.
Felhalar
Great!
Fordrelis
good book
Anazan
Gary Haynes has done marvelous research in the study of known-cause elephant death sites and has used this research to present a very logical comparison to pre-historic proboscidean remains. This book is a "must read" for anyone interested in mammoths and the various extinction theories.