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by William C. Summers
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Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    William C. Summers
  • ISBN:
    0300071272
  • ISBN13:
    978-0300071276
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yale University Press; 2nd ed. edition (June 10, 1999)
  • Pages:
    248 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1848 kb
  • ePUB format
    1822 kb
  • DJVU format
    1204 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    876
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Félix d'Herelle and the origins of molecular biology. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Microbiologists, Internet Archive Wishlist, Molecular biology, Biography, History.

This engaging book is the first full biography of d’Herelle, a complex figure who emulated Louis Pasteur and influenced the course of twentieth-century . Felix d& and the Origins of Molecular Biology.

This engaging book is the first full biography of d’Herelle, a complex figure who emulated Louis Pasteur and influenced the course of twentieth-century biology, yet remained a controversial outsider to the scientific community. Drawing on family papers, archival sources, interviews, and d’Herelle’s published and unpublished writings, Dr. William C. Summers tells the fascinating story of the scientist’s life and the work that took him around the globe. In 1917, d’Herelle published the first paper describing the phenomenon of the bacteriophage and its biological nature.

William C. Summers, . is professor of therapeutic radiology; molecular biophysics and biochemistry; genetics; and in the graduate program in history of medicine and science at Yale University. A rich, original, and well-written book which takes the reader in d’Herelle’s footsteps, from South America to Algeria, from France to Indochina, from Egypt and India to the United States and even to the USSR

Similar books and articles. Felix d'Herelle and the Origins of Molecular Biology by William C. Summers. The Transformation of Molecular Biology on Contact with Higher Organisms, 1960-1980: From a Molecular Description to a Molecular Explanation.

Similar books and articles. Michel Morange - 1997 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 19 (3):369 - 393. Institutionalizing Molecular Biology in Post-War Europe: A Comparative Study. Bruno J. Strasser - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (3):515-546. Added to PP index 2015-02-04.

In 1917, d’Herelle published the first paper describing the phenomenon of the bacteriophage and its biological .

In 1917, d’Herelle published the first paper describing the phenomenon of the bacteriophage and its biological nature. A series of more than 110 articles and 6 major books followed, in which d’Herelle established the foundation for the later work of the Phage Group in molecular biology.

230 pp. New Haven, Conn. Yale University Press, 1999. 230 pp.

This book, the only contemporary study of d'Herelle, will be of interest to historians of science and of medicine, sociologists, and anyone who is interested in the origins and growth of the biomedical revolution of the 20th century

This book, the only contemporary study of d'Herelle, will be of interest to historians of science and of medicine, sociologists, and anyone who is interested in the origins and growth of the biomedical revolution of the 20th century.

In this biography, William Summers places the historical background of the use of bacteriophages as an experimental . In this respect the book does indeed deal with the origins of molecular biology.

In this biography, William Summers places the historical background of the use of bacteriophages as an experimental model system in a wider context. He vividly brings to life the struggle for priority over the discovery, as well as the controversies over the nature of bacteriophages. But d’Herelle’s scientific legacy also constituted the foundations of another recent branch of science, evolutionary medicine

Drawing on family papers, archival sources, interviews, and d’Herelle’s published and unpublished writings, Dr. Summers tells the fascinating .

Drawing on family papers, archival sources, interviews, and d’Herelle’s published and unpublished writings, Dr.

Félix d'Herelle and the origins of molecular biology. Are you sure you want to remove Félix d'Herelle and the origins of molecular biology from your list? Félix d'Herelle and the origins of molecular biology. by William C. Published 1999 by Yale University Press in New Haven, Conn.

A self-taught scientist determined to bring science out of the laboratory and into the practical arena, French-Canadian Felix d’Herelle (1873-1949) made history in two different fields of biology. Not only was he first to demonstrate the use and application of bacteria for biological control of insect pests, he also became a seminal figure in the history of molecular biology. This engaging book is the first full biography of d’Herelle, a complex figure who emulated Louis Pasteur and influenced the course of twentieth-century biology, yet remained a controversial outsider to the scientific community. Drawing on family papers, archival sources, interviews, and d’Herelle’s published and unpublished writings, Dr. William C. Summers tells the fascinating story of the scientist’s life and the work that took him around the globe. In 1917, d’Herelle published the first paper describing the phenomenon of the bacteriophage and its biological nature. A series of more than 110 articles and 6 major books followed, in which d’Herelle established the foundation for the later work of the Phage Group in molecular biology. Yet d’Herelle sometimes inspired animosity in others--he was drummed out of the Pasteur Institute, he held only one brief permanent position in the scientific establishment (at Yale University from 1928 to 1933), and he was bewildered by the social nuances of the world of international science. His story is more than the biography of a single brilliant scientist; it is also a fascinating chapter in the history of biology.

Arabella V.
This book reviews the life of Felix d'Herelle, the man responsible for the co-discovery, naming, and popularization of bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria. From bacteriophages came molecular genetics, and from molecular genetics came biotechnology as well as much of modern biology. Bacteriophages, in the guise of the bacteriophage therapy of bacterial diseases, may even change your life, serving as the next generation of truly effective antibacterial antimicrobials. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and benefited greatly from the insight provided into d'Herelle's life and influence on bacteriophagy. Without question, any individual interested in bacteriophage therapy, or just plain bacteriophages as more than just tools at the heart of molecular biology, will want to read this book.
Mushicage
This textbook is a combination book, partly the biography of an exceptional individual and partly a history of scientific discovery. The author, William Summers, is eminently qualified to write such a text, being a physician, scientist, and historian at Yale University.
D'Herelle is a renowned Canadian Scientist about whom I was totally ignorant. Born in Montreal, he traveled and lived in numerous areas around the world, although France became his eventual home. He never gave up his Canadian citizenship, however. D'Herelle was born to a wealthy family in Montreal, and after high school he traveled extensively, thanks to a gift from his mother. He never found time to return to formal schooling, but he learned enormous amounts in his chosen field, microbiology. His seminal scientific discovery was the description of bacteriophages, and their possible application in human infectious diseases. For this he received numerous awards, and at one time was a research professor at Yale University despite his own lack of formal education. Dr. Summers clearly delineates the process of scientific discovery, and the subsequent controversies over the nature of this new discovery (was it really a living organism or an enzyme?), and the determination of scientific priority. There is a fair amount of technical description, but Dr. Summers is a clear and logical writer who is able to guide the reader through the scientific process.
This book is an incredible work of scholarship, with extensive use of primary source documents. However, because the main thrust of this book is one of scientific discovery, we get very little analysis of d'Herelle's personality. I would have been interested in some speculation on how his lack of formal education might have influenced his often-stormy relationships with other scientists. Also, why was such a distinguished scientist so poorly treated at the Pasteur Institute, his spiritual home? There would be much to learn from a biography of this highly complex individual. Meanwhile, this is an excellent book that helps us understand the nature of scientific enquiry while saluting an outstanding scientist, who just happens to be Canadian.