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by David Utsler,Forrest Clingerman,Brian Treanor
Download Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics (Groundworks: Ecological Issues in Philosophy and Theology) fb2
Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    David Utsler,Forrest Clingerman,Brian Treanor
  • ISBN:
    0823254259
  • ISBN13:
    978-0823254255
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  • Publisher:
    Fordham University Press; 1 edition (November 11, 2013)
  • Pages:
    400 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
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Thus, understanding nature is a fundamentally hermeneutic task The resulting field, environmental hermeneutics, provides the center of gravity.

Thus, understanding nature is a fundamentally hermeneutic task. Interpreting Nature brings together leading voices at the intersection of these two increasingly important philosophical discussions: philosophical hermeneutics and environmental philosophy. The resulting field, environmental hermeneutics, provides the center of gravity for a collection of essays that grapple with one of the most compelling issues of our time: how do humans relate to nature?

Forrest Clingerman is associate professor of philosophy and religion at Ohio Northern University. In addition, he has published a number of articles on environmental thought.

Forrest Clingerman is associate professor of philosophy and religion at Ohio Northern University. Martin Drenthen is associate professor of philosophy at Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherlands).

Series: Groundworks: Ecological Issues in Philosophy and Theology. David Utsler, Forrest Clingerman, Martin Drenthen and Brian Treanor. Published by: Fordham University. Among the most challenging issues facing environmental hermeneutics is how to think about person-world relationships in an integrated manner-not by way of conceptually separated natural environments and social spheres-as if there were either some pure nature untouched by our interpretations and actions or any human life apart from environmental dynamics.

Similar books and articles. Wilderness as the Place Between Philosophy and Theology: Questioning Martin Drenthen on the Otherness of Nature. Forrest Clingerman - 2010 - Environmental Values 19 (2):211-232. Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics. Paul Guernsey - 2015 - Environmental Philosophy 12 (1):135-138. Reading Ourselves Through the Land: Landscape Hermeneutics and Ethics of Place', In: F. Clingerman & M. Dixon (Ed.

Environmental Hermeneutics. David Utsler, Forrest Clingerman, Martin Drenthen, and Brian Treanor. In other words, at the heart of every confrontation of concept and perception is the issue of hermeneutics: the art and science of interpretation. Friedrich Nietzsche famously stated: There are no facts, only interpretations. Perhaps this could be slightly rephrased: no facts go uninterpreted. The present volume uncovers some of the ways that interpretation takes place in the human relationship to the environment. This collection brings together essays on the questions that hermeneutics raises for environmental philosophy.

Environmental hermeneutics is a term for a wide range of scholarship that applies the techniques and resources of the philosophical field of hermeneutics to environmental issues. That is to say it addresses issues of interpretation as they relate to nature and environmental issues broadly conceived to include wilderness, ecosystems, landscapes, ecology, the built environment (architecture), life, embodiment, and more.

Interpreting Nature book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Interpreting Nature book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Interpreting nature: the emerging field of environmental hermeneutics Eschatology of Environmental Bliss in Romans 8: 18–22 and the Imperative of Present Environmental Sustainability from a Nigerian Perspective. F Clingerman, MH Dixon.

Interpreting nature: the emerging field of environmental hermeneutics. F Clingerman, B Treanor, M Drenthen, D Utsler. Fordham University Press, 2013. Worldviews: Global religions, culture, and ecology 13 (1), 72-91, 2009. Eschatology of Environmental Bliss in Romans 8: 18–22 and the Imperative of Present Environmental Sustainability from a Nigerian Perspective.

Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics, New York: Fordham University Press. Clingerman, F. and M. Dixon (2011). Cronon, William (1992). A Place for Stories: Nature, History, and Narrative. Journal of American History 78 (1992): 1347-76. Drenthen, M. and J. Keulartz (2014). Environmental Aesthetics: Crossing Divides and Breaking Ground, New York: Fordham University Press. MacIntyre, Narratives, and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 20 (1998): 3-21

Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics more. Chapter 5: "Must Environmental Philosophy Relinquish the Concept of Nature? A Hermeneutic Reply to Steven Vogel W. S. K. Cameron, Loyola Marymount University

Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics more. The twentieth century saw the rise of hermeneutics, the philosophical interpretation of texts, and eventually the application of its insights to metaphorical texts such as individual and group identities. Cameron, Loyola Marymount University. Section II: issues of environmental hermeneutics. A. situating the self.

Modern environmentalism has come to realize that many of its key concerns―“wilderness” and “nature” among them―are contested territory, viewed differently by different people. Understanding nature requires science and ecology, to be sure, but it also requires a sensitivity to history, culture, and narrative. Thus, understanding nature is a fundamentally hermeneutic task.