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by Kelvin K. P. Lim,Dennis H. Murphy,N. Sivasothi,Peter K. L. Ng,K. S. Tan
Download A Guide to the Mangroves of Singapore II fb2
Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    Kelvin K. P. Lim,Dennis H. Murphy,N. Sivasothi,Peter K. L. Ng,K. S. Tan
  • ISBN:
    9810413084
  • ISBN13:
    978-9810413088
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Singapore Science Centre; 2nd edition (2002)
  • Pages:
    168 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
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    1130 kb
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    1966 kb
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    1107 kb
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S. Tan,Peter K. L. Ng,N Established in 2004, we have over 500,000 books in stock. No quibble refund if not completely satisfied.

S. Ng,N. Sivasothi,Dennis H. Murphy,Kelvin K. P. Lim. ISBN 10: 9810413084 ISBN 13: 9789810413088. Established in 2004, we have over 500,000 books in stock. Ng,N Book Description 2002.

Start by marking A Guide To The Mangroves Of Singapore Ii as Want to Read .

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by Kelvin K. Lim, Dennis H. Murphy, N. Sivasothi, Peter K. Ng, K. S. Ta. Coauthors & Alternates. Tan. ISBN 9789810413088 (978-981-04-1308-8) Softcover, Singapore Science Centre, 2002.

Tannins and dyes: Bark of mangrove trees are harvested as a source of tannin for the tanning industry.

Mangrove Products Non-food Food. Productive use value is the one most visible for mangroves. In Singapore, because mangroves have shrunk in area so considerably, productive use value is practically zero, but in the rest of the world, this is still very significant. The products that can be extracted for sale in local and international markets are myriad. Tannins and dyes: Bark of mangrove trees are harvested as a source of tannin for the tanning industry. High tannin content is found especially in members of the Rhizophoraceae, to increase their resistance to herbivores.

fact sheets with photos: from the guide to mangroves of singapore. The mangrove forests that remain are no longer complete ecosystems. At the time of the founding of modern Singapore in 1819, forest covered practically the whole of the main island. Of the original forest area, evergreen rain forest made up 82%, mangrove 13% and freshwater swamp forest, 5%. Today, only about 2. sq km of land area is still covered by primary and secondary forest (maps comparing vegetation of Singapore circa 1819 and 1990's), and this habitat loss in Singapore has reduced her primary forest cover to. an estimated . % of the land.

a b Kelvin K. Murphy, T. Morgany, N. Ng, B. C. Soong, Hugh T. W. Tan, K. Tan & T. K. .A Guide to the Mangroves of Singapore. Singapore Science Centre. Tan (1999). Mud lobster, Thalassina anomala". In Peter K. Ng; N. Sivasothi (ed. "Mangrove lobster (Thalassina squamifera)". Marine Life of the Dampier Archipelago. Western Australian Museum. a b c d Lipke B. Holthuis (1991).

The carapace is tall and ovoid, extends over less than one third of the animal's length, and projects forward into a short rostrum cite book url.

Guide to the Mangroves of Singapore. PKL Ng, N Sivasothi, T Morgany. Singapore Science Centre, 1999. KP Kelvin, HM Dennis, T Morgany, N Sivasothi, KLN Peter, BC Soong. Heavy metal contamination in mangrove habitats of Singapore. DT Cuong, S Bayen, O Wurl, K Subramanian, KKS Wong, N Sivasothi,. Marine Pollution Bulletin 50 (12), 1732-1738, 2005. The status of otters (Carnivora: Mustelidae: Lutrinae) in Singapore and Malaysia, and the diet of Smooth-Coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata in Penang, west Malaysia.