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by Mark Kurlansky
Download Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World fb2
Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    Mark Kurlansky
  • ISBN:
    0140275010
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140275018
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Books; 1 edition (July 1, 1998)
  • Pages:
    294 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1647 kb
  • ePUB format
    1210 kb
  • DJVU format
    1899 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    508
  • Formats:
    docx doc azw mbr


Kurlansky's marvelous fish opus stands as a reminder of what good non-fiction used to be: eloquent . In the story of the cod, Mark Kurlansky has found the tragic fable of our age - abundance turned to scarcity through determined shortsightedness

Kurlansky's marvelous fish opus stands as a reminder of what good non-fiction used to be: eloquent, learned, and full of earthy narratives that delight and appall. In the end the book stands as a kind of elegy, a loving eulogy not only to a fish, but to the people whose lives have been shaped by the habits of the fish, and whose way of life is now at an en. -Newsday. In the story of the cod, Mark Kurlansky has found the tragic fable of our age - abundance turned to scarcity through determined shortsightedness. This classic history will stand as an epitaph and a warning.

Mark Kurlansky (December 7, 1948) is an American journalist and writer of general interest non-fiction. He has written a number of books of fiction and non-fiction. His work and contribution to Basque identity and culture was recognized in 2001 when the Society of Basque Studies in America named him to the Basque Hall of Fame

In the story of the cod, Mark Kurlansky has found the tragic fable of our age-abundance turned to scarcity . One emerges from Mark Kurlansky’s little book with a feeling that the codfish not only changed the world during the past one thousand years but seemed to define it.

In the story of the cod, Mark Kurlansky has found the tragic fable of our age-abundance turned to scarcity through determined shortsightedness. This eminently readable book is a new tool for scanning world history. -Ocean Navigator. A readable, credible, and at times incredible tale.

Cod, Mark Kurlansky’s third work of nonfiction and winner of the 1999 James Beard Award, is the biography of a single species of fish, but it may as well be a world history with this humble fish as its recurring main character. Cod, it turns out, is the reason Europeans set sail across the Atlantic, and it is the only reason they could.

Salted fish needs to have the water in which it is soaking changed periodically so that the fish is not sitting in salt water.

COD. Mark Kurlansky worked for several years on commercial fishing boats, and subsequently became a journalist, covering beats in Eastern and Western Europe, the Caribbean, and Latin America for the Chicago Tribune and the International Herald Tribune. He has written for magazines including Harper’s, Audubon, and The New York Times Magazine, and contributes a column on food history to Food & Wine magazine. Salted fish needs to have the water in which it is soaking changed periodically so that the fish is not sitting in salt water.

Kurlansky has such a way with his storytelling that the reader finds themselves in the middle of the story before realising how much time has passed. Full of anecdotes and personal asides, Kurlansky personalises the topic more than many historians can do for actual human subjects. Who would have thought that cod could be such a complex food, while also being such a binding agent for small communities?

By the end of Mark Kurlansky's Cod, we know nobody is to blame, except the entire human race, and only because we are such phenomenally proficient predators.

By the end of Mark Kurlansky's Cod, we know nobody is to blame, except the entire human race, and only because we are such phenomenally proficient predators. Also, the cod are gone because Englishmen crave fish and chips, and Basques want a codfish dish called bacalao a la Vizcaina and kids need cod-liver oil and New Englanders have always had a hankering for cod chowder, which Daniel Webster once orated upon in the . By the end of Cod, we know why Kurlansky subtitles his book A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World. In an afterword he gives us 600 years of cod recipes,.

This book spans 1,000 years and four continents. From the Vikings to Clarence Birdseye, Mark Kurlansky introduces the explorers, merchants, writers, chefs and fisherman, whose lives have been interwoven with this prolific fish. He chronicles the cod wars of the 16th and 20th centuries. He blends in recipes and lore from the Middle Ages to the present. In a story that brings world history and human passions into captivating focus, he shows how the most profitable fish in history is today faced with extinction.

He chronicles the fifteenth-century politics of the Hanseatic League and the cod wars of the sixteenth and twentieth centuries. He embellishes his story with gastronomic detail, blending in recipes and lore from the Middle Ages to the present. Mark Kurlansky is the author of several bestselling non-fiction titles including Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World (winner of the Glenfiddich Best Food Book Award), The Basque History of the World, Salt: A World History, 1968: The Year that Rocked the World, a short story collection The White Man in the Tree and a novel, Boogaloo.

An unexpected, energetic look at world history on sea and land from the bestselling author of Salt and The Basque History of the WorldCod, Mark Kurlansky’s third work of nonfiction and winner of the 1999 James Beard Award, is the biography of a single species of fish, but it may as well be a world history with this humble fish as its recurring main character. Cod, it turns out, is the reason Europeans set sail across the Atlantic, and it is the only reason they could. What did the Vikings eat in icy Greenland and on the five expeditions to America recorded in the Icelandic sagas? Cod, frozen and dried in the frosty air, then broken into pieces and eaten like hardtack. What was the staple of the medieval diet? Cod again, sold salted by the Basques, an enigmatic people with a mysterious, unlimited supply of cod. As we make our way through the centuries of cod history, we also find a delicious legacy of recipes, and the tragic story of environmental failure, of depleted fishing stocks where once their numbers were legendary. In this lovely, thoughtful history, Mark Kurlansky ponders the question: Is the fish that changed the world forever changed by the world's folly?“Every once in a while a writer of particular skill takes a fresh, seemingly improbable idea and turns out a book of pure delight. Such is the case of Mark Kurlansky and the codfish.” –David McCullough, author of The Wright Brothers and 1776


Legionstatic
While I am still not quite ready to eat fish for dinner anytime soon - despite great recipes - I must say that this is a truly fascinating read - author Mark Kurlasnsky does amazing research and I while I do not generally consider myself a fan of nonfiction - I hereby declare I will read everything Kurlansky writes!
And furthermore, I suggest you do the same - I now know more about fishing than I ever expected to, but I am truly interested in the whole story of the fish this volume celebrates! I've learned more history and refreshed my grasp of geographywithin the pages of this little book than I have in years! I feel I could probably hold a conversation with an old salt fisherman on the merits of the quality of cod caught off of the Grand Banks! I really enjoyed this book and I am now reading Kurlansky's book "Dancing in the Streets" and next in line is his book about the Basque people! Oh and I heartily reccomend KUrlansky's book "Salt" it is astounding!
Skilkancar
A great book by Mark Kurlansky that explores the globalization of cod and shows its impact of history. This book taught me so much about this simple fishes influence on the past and current world. The book was as informative as it was entertaining. This book was by no means boring and I often found myself losing a few hours getting lost in the story of cod fishermen. Kurlansky writing is rich and full of an unexpected amount if emotion about his topics. The various recipes the use cod scattered around the book were a novelty touch and seem very interesting! I'm really considering trying one...only I find myself stopped by the knowledge provided by Kurlansky of how over fished cod are!
Oghmaghma
I can't recommend this book often enough. Kurlansky is a brilliant writer and does this sort-of "all the world's connected" kind of history extremely well. After reading, you think, "D'uh, I should've known that" when considering the centrality of food acquisition and production to the political-economy of the modern era, but Kurlansky is so gifted a writer that each discovery -- the reader's and those historical figures who are doing the discovering -- is an absolute delight. The book is also a splendid demonstration of just why the basics -- food and water -- are likely to be sources of conflict in coming decades.
Iriar
An interesting and fairly short book on the history of cod and cod fishing, this read will appeal to those that like history and/or have ties to the fishing industry. I happen to really enjoy history and my dad is a professional captain and master fisherman, so I've actually been out long lining before. There are some places in this book where it gets confusing, all the different places, names, etc., so that my one complaint would be that it started to read a bit here and there like a dry text book. Other than that, it was an entertaining and colorful read and I am glad I took the recommendation of my dad to read it.

While crazy environmentalists won't need to read this book to be convinced of anything, they will certainly find a bit of ammunition, but more importantly, those of us that are strong believers in free trade and capitalism, but also believe it is responsible to conserve and protect nature, this book speaks volumes.

Another interesting area that the book got into a little bit is how the cod fishing industry effected early American history, both from the settlers to the framers as well as its ties to the slave and rum trades of that era.

Icelandic history and a bit of history regarding the Cod Wars was also something entertaining to read and new to me. I'd never read before how offshore fisheries can result in so much dissension and also how we came about having a 200 mile offshore limit (not that long ago it was much smaller).

I give this book a strong recommendation to those that like this kind of historical reading, (books like Longitude) and also those that are in any way connected to commercial fishing.
Sagda
Eye opening, lots of history, a real page turner, I now have something to talk about besides "Salt". I'm not an English major, the writing was attention grabbing and really hard to put this book down.
Iesha
I loved this book--a desert rat who knows nothing about fishing. The story of how this fish influenced the discovery of the New World and the development of the US economy is breathtaking. My husband and I came to love bacaloa after a couple of trips to Portugal and Spain--wish I had known the cod story then.
Adrietius
Cod by Mark Kurlansky, my new favorite author, is an excellent read and I have given it as gifts to several people over the past year.
Kurlansky succinctly and wittily tells the tale of this diminishing fish, and backs it up with some sensible history, e.g.. why the Pilgrims chose to starve rather than fish, and refused to eat lobsters which were teeming in the waters of Cape Cod. "Huge speckled, clacking monsters" they were ashamed to offer guests. He explains how cod fed the underclasses in England for centuries (fish & chips) and how they were salted and preserved to feed slaves in the West Indies, as well as sailors roaming the seven seas.
Captivating reading for anyone interested in the history of these regions, or the fish itself.
It's great, being one of the first narrative non-fiction books that talks about a specific species of fish and its history. I think now there are other books a bit more engaging, but they all talk about this one as being their main inspiration.