» » Mammalian Thermogenesis

Download Mammalian Thermogenesis fb2

by Lucien Girardier
Download Mammalian Thermogenesis fb2
Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    Lucien Girardier
  • ISBN:
    0412235501
  • ISBN13:
    978-0412235504
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Springer; 1 edition (August 18, 1983)
  • Pages:
    360 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1182 kb
  • ePUB format
    1169 kb
  • DJVU format
    1279 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    198
  • Formats:
    mbr lit rtf docx


Mammalian Thermogenesis. Bibliographic Information. Mammalian Thermogenesis. Springer Netherlands.

Mammalian Thermogenesis. price for USA in USD (gross). ISBN 978-94-011-6032-2. Digitally watermarked, DRM-free. Chapman and Hall Ltd. An Energy Dissipating Tissue. 50. Autonomic Regulation of Thermogenesis.

Все продавцы . 99. Thyroid Hormones and Thermogenesis. 141. Energetics of Maintenance and Growth.

Mammalian Thermogenesis has been added to your Cart. Mammalian Thermogenesis Paperback – 22 Jan 2012.

Mammalian Thermogenesis book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

amp; Stock, Michael J. (1983). Book, Online - Google Books. London ; New York : Chapman and Hall, 1983 viii, 359 p. : ill. London ; New York : Chapman and Hall. Australian/Harvard Citation.

an attempt to rationalize these terminological and conceptual difficulties we have considered the origins of mammalian heat production from two different points of view. The scheme depicted in Fig. 1. 1 illustrates the fate of energy in the body as seen by the nutritionist.

Includes bibliographical references and index. Personal Name: Girardier, Lucien. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Effectors of Thermogenesis : Proceedings of a Symposium Held at Geneva (Switzerland) on 14 to 16 July 1977.

The thermogenic effect of tea is generally attributed to its caffeine content Lucien Girardier, Josiane Seydoux, Torben Clausen.

The thermogenic effect of tea is generally attributed to its caffeine content. We report here that a green tea extract stimulates brown adipose tissue thermogenesis to an extent which is much greate. More). Lucien Girardier, Josiane Seydoux, Torben Clausen. Membrane potentials were recorded in isolated segments of interscapular brown adipose tissue from rats.

an attempt to rationalize these terminological and conceptual difficulties we have considered the origins of mammalian heat production from two different points of view. The scheme depicted in Fig. 1. 1 illustrates the fate of energy in the body as seen by the nutritionist. After allowing for losses of energy in faeces and urine, the metabolizable energy obtained from food is utilized for main­ taining and increasing body energy content (maintenance, external work, growth and production). The transformation of metabolizable energy into these forms of net energy also involves inevitable energy losses in the form of heat - thermic energy. Similarly, maintaining homeothermy in cold en­ vironments involves shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) and the energy costs of assimilating nutrients and retaining net energy results in obligatory heat losses due to diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT). This obligatory DIT is mainly due to the energy cost of protein and fat synthesis but, in addition to this, there is an adaptive component of DIT that helps maintain body energy content (i. e. body weight) by dissipating the metabolizable energy consumed in excess of the requirements for maintenance, growth and production. In Fig. 1. 2, we have converted this nutritionist's scheme (A) into one that A B r-------. . . , I I Production, Growth I I External work I I I I Essential energy expenditure NET BASAL Obligatory 1 I ENERGY Maintenance HEAT heat I FASTING at (BMR) productlpn for t ROC thermoneutrallty homeothermia r.