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by Thomas J. Elpel
Download Botany in a Day:  The Patterns Method of Plant Identification fb2
Biological Sciences
  • Author:
    Thomas J. Elpel
  • ISBN:
    1892784157
  • ISBN13:
    978-1892784155
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HOPS Press, LLC; 5 edition (January 2004)
  • Pages:
    221 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biological Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1747 kb
  • ePUB format
    1400 kb
  • DJVU format
    1115 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    257
  • Formats:
    txt lrf lit lrf


Botany in a Day presents a simplified way of identifying plants through learning the patterns in over 100 plant families. 100 people found this helpful.

Botany in a Day presents a simplified way of identifying plants through learning the patterns in over 100 plant families. -Ecology Action Newsletter.

Botany in a Day book. Learn to identify plants by the hundreds, based on the principle that related plants have similar patterns for identification and that they often have similar uses.

com Plant Identification, Edible Plants, Weed Ecology, Mushrooms, and more

com Plant Identification, Edible Plants, Weed Ecology, Mushrooms, and more.

Автор: Elpel Thomas J. Название: Botany in a Day: The Patterns . This book is widely used in nature programs and promoted in national parks. Each family of related plants has unique patterns for identification.

This book is widely used in nature programs and promoted in national parks. Botany in a Day is your passport connection to nature and discovering the amazing world of plants.

Botany and plant identification lesson plan from the free Outdoor Skills Online Curriculum Guide. A picture is worth a thousand words

Botany and plant identification lesson plan from the free Outdoor Skills Online Curriculum Guide. Teach and learn eight plant families, evolutionary concepts, and identify monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Botany and plant identification lesson plan from the free Outdoor Skills Online Curriculum Guide. A picture is worth a thousand words. com/Books/Botany in a Day.

Botany in a Day : The Patterns Method of Plant Identification. This book is widely used in nature programs and promoted in national parks

Botany in a Day : The Patterns Method of Plant Identification. By (author) Thomas J Elpel. With more than 50,000 copies sold, this is a passport to identifying plants and their uses. Looking for a faster, easier, and engaging way to identify plants? Related plants have similar characteristics, and they often have similar uses. Botany in a Day is your passport connection to nature and discovering the amazing world of plants! show more. Format Paperback 235 pages.

in Botany in a Day Thomas Elpel makes plant ID fast. Thomas breaks down plants into seven basic families, he shows you the characteristics of each family. Once you have mastered the patterns you can use in reference guide (which makes up the bulk of the book), which will help you identify thousands of plants with ease. Learning to identify plants is made so much easier with this book. I highly recommend it for learning.

Looking for a faster, easier, and fun way to identify plants? Botany in a Day teaches you the patterns method of plant identification, so that you can discover the wonderful world of plants around you, wherever you go.

Instead of trying to identify plants one-at-a-time, Botany in a Day give you a way to learn them by the hundreds, based on the principle that related plants have similar patterns for indentification, and they often have similar uses.

The one-day tutorial included in the text teaches you seven key patterns to recognize more than 45,000 species of plants worldwide. Master these seven patterns and you will be ready to use the included reference guide--Thomas J. Elpel's Herbal Field Guide to Plant Families of North America. Here you will find the patterns for indentification and the patterns of uses for the majority of plants across the continent.

Botany in a Day is used as a guide by thousands of individuals, plus herbal schools and universities across North America.


Deorro
Botany in a day: The patterns method of plant identification by Thomas J. Elpel

To purchase: http://www.hopspress.com/.

This website also has a 45 minute tutorial overview of the book.

One important discovery from this book is that knowing the name of a plant does not tell you anything about the plant's properties. It is far more important to know the name of the plant family because similar plants (in the same family) have similar characteristics. Moreover, you may know something about the plant's edible or medicinal properties, just by knowing which plant family it belongs to.

The following list provides a generalized outline of the evolutionary progess of plants from simple to complex vegetation: (1) spore plants without a vascular system, (2) spore plants with a vascular system, (3) naked seeds, (4) flowering plants, (5) monocots, dicots, and eudicots, (6) specialized flowers, (7) composit flowers (p.8).

Eight key plant families (the biggest plant families in the world) are introduced in the book. These eight families (Mint, Mustard, Parsley, Pea, Lily, Grass, Rose, and Aster) include more than 450,000 species of plants worldwide. Here are some of the unique characteristics of each plant family. The pattern for the Mint family is square stalks, opposite leaves, and usually aromatic. The pattern for the Parsley family is compound umbels . The Mustard family pattern is 4 petals with 6 stamens - 4 tall and 2 short. The Pea family pattern has distinctive banner, wings, and keel petals that are not found on other flowers. The Lily family (and its allies) have 3 sepals and 3 petals, usually identical in size and color. Grass family plants have hollow flower stems with knee-like nodes or joints. The Rose family pattern is 5 petals and numerous stamens, often with oval, serated leaves. The Aster family have unique composite flowerheads. One flowerhead is made up of many smaller flowers.

Unfortunately, over time plants undergo name changes just like Saint Petersburg in Russia became renamed Petrograd in 1914, Leningrad in 1924, and back to Saint Petersburg in 1991. This could lead to confusion if you thought these were three separate cities, or if you tried to find Petrograd on a modern map after readinging a 1920 book about Russia.

In order to classify your flowering plant, you need to determine if it is a monocot or a dicot. Monocots usually have parallel-veined leaves and flower parts mostly in threes. Dicot plants mostly have net-veined leaves and parts in fours and fives. If your plant is a dicot, you need to determine if it is a member of the Aster family, the largest family of flowering plants in the northern latitudes. As a matter of probability, it makes sense to determine whether or not your sample is a member of the Aster family before checking any others. If your plant is definitely not a member of the Aster family, then you need to profile your dicot flower using pages 24-34 in the book.

Elpel correctly states that herbalism is rooted in the basic properties, such as astringent, mucilaginous, or aromatic. You can often learn all you need about active ingredients of a plant with your senses. For instance, plants with white, milky sap contain some type of latex. Plants that form suds when beaten in water usually contain saponin. Aromatic plants contain volatile oils. Plants with clear slimy juice are considered mucilaginous (p.213). Once you learn to recognize this constituent and know what it is used for, then you know the approximate use of thousands of similar plants around the world.

The last chapter of Elpel's book was very helpful. It was entitled the medical properties of plants. Elpel states, "You can learn to determine the uses of many plants without ever knowing their names (p.212)." For example, suppose you chew up a leaf and get the sensation of cotton mouth. Your mouth seems to run out of saliva, a good indicator of tannic acid, one of the most prevalent plant constituents. Tannic acids are useful for drying up diarrhea or dysentery. They also help tighten up ulcerated tissues, facilitating healing in cases of stomach ulcers and bloody urine. Astringent plants which produce tannic acids can also tone and strengthen mucous membranes, such as in the urinary tract. Externally these plants are useful as a poultice or wash to heal cuts, eczema, and eruptions on the skin. They can also even be used as a facial toner to reduce wrinkles or as a poultice against blistering (p.217).

The lemony-sour taste in rhubarb and many other plants comes from oxalic acid. Oxalic acid is helpful as a digestive aid for heartburn or constipation. The Buckwheat, Woodsorrel, Purslane, and Aamarath/Goosefoot families include plants that are rich in oxalic acid. Fomic acid from the Stinging Nettle family can be used to take away itch and it can also help with arthritis (p.218).

Acrid substances cause a hot, biting sensation on the tongue, much like horseradish. For this reason, acrid plants are often used as emmenagogues (menstrual stimulants), diaphoretics (which cause sweating), diuretics (which cause increased urination), and galactogogues (which increase milk flow). An acrid mustard plaster on the chest can help warm and stimulate congested lungs. Acrid poultices can even stimulate activity in cases of mild paralysis. But these poultices can cause blistering if left on too long. Acrid poultices can even be used on external cancerous tumors to burn out the growth of the cancer. Acrid plants are also used for warts.

Plants with acrid latex sap are used like other acrid substances (above) to stimulate the body, to stimulate digestive secretions, to promote digestion, to assist as a laxative, to stimulate (dilate) the bronchioles to aid in fightly lung infections.

Elple gave a lot of information about alkaloids. But the section I found most interesting was that Indole alkaloid from the ergot fungus (see the Grass family) has been used as a vasoconstrictor for migrane headaches (p.219).

Resins are especially useful for their expectorant qualities to help expel phlegm during a cold. If you drink the warm tea of a resinous plant, your throat becomes coated with the sticky substance. It protects tissues from irritation when coughing and phlegm is more easily coughed up. Resins also have a warming or stimulating property which is useful when applied to arthritic joints.

If this book is ever revised, I recommend a glossary which could include botanical terms such as carpels, chambers, partition walls, placentation, umbels, and other words which were not defined in the book (as far as I could tell).

I recommend this book for anyone interested in learning more about botany or herbal medicine.
Siramath
Botany in a Day provides an excellent overview to field botany. By learning plant characteristics by family, the reader can more quickly identify their plant by identifying the patterns each plant family presents. The book provides a page or two (or more!) on dozens of the most common families in the northern half of the US. Each plant family section contains additional information about the plant genera represented in this family. The keys to plant families allow the reader to quickly determine what section to turn to. This book is best coupled with a plant field guide to individual species that is grouped by family. You can use the Botany in a Day information to narrow your selection to the family and the field guide to identify the specific species.

I highly recommend this book to both lay and professional people who work with plants.
Coiriel
I really like the concept of this book and had a good time studying it, though some parts were a bit technical. Some reviewers commented on how "in a day" is misleading. I spent about a week studying it and still haven't come close to mastering it, but the core concept is simple. My biggest aha was in learning to identify members of the aster family. The thing I was mostly disappointed about was that the main means for identification came down to a plant's flowers. That may be the best way to identify members of a given family, but what do you do when they aren't in bloom? There were some comments about leaves, fruit, etc, but it mostly talked about flowers. I think the author did a good job. It wasn't everything I ever dreamed it could be, but it was very helpful.
Faegal
Nobody learns botanical ID in one day! The concept is great, however as a (degreed) novice, I found that it is not written for beginners at all. I quickly ordered a glossary of botanical terms because the book is written as though all readers are comfortable with them. I would not recommend to another beginner.
Debeme
I was looking forward to reading this book and using it with my herbal studies. I am living in South Florida and it clearly states in the beginning of the book that it is meant to be used for readers up North. I'm sure there is a book out there somewhere like this just for Florida..........I just haven't found it yet. I hope the author can create a similar series for those of us down South. I did return it. :-(
Kanek
I bought this for my 7 year old daughter, out little "budding botanist," *har har.* Rather than read it all at once, she would savor and study each section until she had it committed to memory. Upon realizing how much my little one was learning, I picked it up, and devoure it. Concise, yet descriptive. It is not a studyguideforyou to memorize, rather, it teaches you the way botanists and scientists discern one plant from another...i.e. how to think like a botanist.