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by Gregory Murphy
Download The Big Book of Concepts (A Bradford Book) fb2
Behavioral Sciences
  • Author:
    Gregory Murphy
  • ISBN:
    0262632993
  • ISBN13:
    978-0262632997
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    A Bradford Book; Revised edition (January 30, 2004)
  • Pages:
    568 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Behavioral Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1443 kb
  • ePUB format
    1438 kb
  • DJVU format
    1703 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    105
  • Formats:
    doc docx rtf azw


Start by marking The Big Book of Concepts (Bradford Books) as Want to Read . But persistent theoretical disputes have sometimes obscured this progress

Start by marking The Big Book of Concepts (Bradford Books) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. But persistent theoretical disputes have sometimes obscured this progress. The Big Book of Concepts goes beyond those disputes to reveal the advances that have been made, focusing on the major empirical discoveries.

Gregory Murphy begins this extraordinary book by saying, "Concepts are the glue that holds our mental world together". This is actually an understatement. Without concepts there would be no mental world in the first place. Concepts are mental representations that tie together specific instances, and are essential for relating ongoing experience to knowledge from the past. Concepts allow us to move from William James' "blooming buzzing confusion" to structured and adaptive thought.

Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin.

Book · August 2002 with 3 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Publisher: The MIT Press. Cite this publication. Concepts embody our knowledge of the kinds of things there are in the world.

Arthur B. Markman, Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin.

Concepts embody our knowledge of the kinds of things there are in the world. Tying our past experiences to our present interactions with the environment, they enable us to recognize and understand new objects and events. Concepts are also relevant to understanding domains such as social situations, personality types, and even artistic styles. Yet like other phenomenologically simple cognitive processes such as walking or understanding speech, concept formation and use are maddeningly complex.

Books: Cognitive Science: Gregory Murphy. Date: Fri, 08 Nov 2002 11:07:45 +0000 From: dgw

Born in Baltimore, Maryland, on April 8, 1951, Morrow grew up in Littleton, Colorado, and, "after a decade of vagabonding from Honduras to France, Italy to England", settled in New York City, where he remains.

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Concepts embody our knowledge of the kinds of things there are in the world. Tying our past experiences to our present interactions with the environment, they enable us to recognize and understand new objects and events. Concepts are also relevant to understanding domains such as social situations, personality types, and even artistic styles. Yet like other phenomenologically simple cognitive processes such as walking or understanding speech, concept formation and use are maddeningly complex.

Research since the 1970s and the decline of the "classical view" of concepts have greatly illuminated the psychology of concepts. But persistent theoretical disputes have sometimes obscured this progress. The Big Book of Concepts goes beyond those disputes to reveal the advances that have been made, focusing on the major empirical discoveries. By reviewing and evaluating research on diverse topics such as category learning, word meaning, conceptual development in infants and children, and the basic level of categorization, the book develops a much broader range of criteria than is usual for evaluating theories of concepts.


Taulkree
It can get a bit dry, but the concepts are very interesting. If you've studied AI or machine learning you can see a lot of similarities between how concepts exist in our minds and how we teach computers
Ballalune
This is a wonderful review. It is a little dry at times, and often repetitive. But it really does sum the material on concept theory. The Big Book of Concepts has been a valuable asset to my library.
Cordanara
Sons book....
Teonyo
The Big Book of Concepts is the best book on concepts since George Lakoff's Women, Fire and Dangerous Things, published 15 years earlier. I am a professional cognitive scientist and I first read this book a number of years ago. I recently needed to look something up on infant concept formation, so I reread the chapter called "Concepts in Infancy," and was reminded just how good the book is. It is crammed with so much information that it has the potential for being as dry as dust, but, happily, it is loaded with clear examples, and is written in such a fluid style that you tend to keep reading, even after you've found the item or reference or example you were looking for. The book includes in-depth discussions of everything from theories of what constitutes a concept, to how they develop, to how they are related to words, and to the role of computational modeling in concept understanding (the succinct description of Nosofsky's Generalized Context Model, pp. 65-71, is one of the clearest, simplest descriptions of that model around). In short, for people interested in concepts and categorization, this book is a must-have for their library.
Llanonte
Gregory Murphy begins this extraordinary book by saying, "Concepts are the glue that holds our mental world together". This is actually an understatement. Without concepts there would be no mental world in the first place. Concepts are mental representations that tie together specific instances, and are essential for relating ongoing experience to knowledge from the past. Concepts allow us to move from William James' "blooming buzzing confusion" to structured and adaptive thought.
Murphy is one of the leading scholars in this area, and he reviews a messy and complicated literature with honesty, clarity, and wit. This is going to be the classic text in the field for a very long time. It is one of the rare cases where the standard back-of-the-book blurb is actually true: Anyone seriously interested in concepts and categorization - seasoned researchers, graduates and advanced undergraduates, or scholars who simply want to get a sense of the field - really must read this book.
(Note: this is an excerpt from a review that was published in the journal "Nature")