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Download The Stargazer's Guide to the Universe: A Complete Visual Guide to Interpreting the Cosmos fb2

by Robin Kerrod
Download The Stargazer's Guide to the Universe: A Complete Visual Guide to Interpreting the Cosmos fb2
Astronomy & Space Science
  • Author:
    Robin Kerrod
  • ISBN:
    0764158449
  • ISBN13:
    978-0764158445
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Barron's Educational Series (October 1, 2005)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Astronomy & Space Science
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1558 kb
  • ePUB format
    1350 kb
  • DJVU format
    1932 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    303
  • Formats:
    docx lit lrf doc


Start by marking Stargazer's Guide to the Universe: A. .Exploring further into deep space, it pres This stunningly illustrated visual guide to the heavens deserves a place on every amateur astronomer's bookshelf.

Start by marking Stargazer's Guide to the Universe: A Complete Visual Guide to Interpreting the Cosmos as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It features both sky maps and dramatic photos of all major constellations, from Andromeda to Virgo. It also provides a stargazer's excursion across the solar system, focusing on planets, asteroids, meteors, and comets.

Guide to the Universe : A Complete Visual Guide to Interpreting the Cosmos. This stunningly illustrated visual guide to the heavens deserves a place on every amateur astronomer's bookshelf.

The Stargazer's Guide to the Universe : A Complete Visual Guide to Interpreting the Cosmos.

The Stargazer's Guide to the Universe is printed throughout in full color and features more than 250 photos and illustrations. The Stargazer's Guide to the Universe: A Complete Visual Guide to Interpreting the Cosmos by Fellow Robin Kerrod (Hardback, 2005). Read full description. See details and exclusions. Sold byanimal lector (639)100. 0% positive FeedbackContact seller.

Sun. by Robin Kerrod. Coauthors & Alternates.

Now, Robin Kerrod, one of the world’s leading writers on astronomy and space, has expertly updated . Recent planetary discoveries from the newest space probes and landers bring us closer to the cosmos than ever before.

Recent planetary discoveries from the newest space probes and landers bring us closer to the cosmos than ever before.

Ceres: Pluto's Little Sister/Plutos kleine Schwester.

AboutSee all. Contact Stargazers’ Visual Guide to the Cosmos on Messenger. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Ceres: Pluto's Little Sister/Plutos kleine Schwester.

The book provides a feeling for all the key issues and deep current controversies, and counters the common . An example of calculation is given for the universe. The method also offers a challenging view to bottom-up approaches in progress.

An example of calculation is given for the universe.

NightWatch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe is a best-selling popular science book by Terence Dickinson. NightWatch is widely regarded as the essential guidebook for beginning stargazers. First published in 1983, there are over 800,000 copies in print, making it the top-selling stargazing guide in the world during the past 20 years.

This stunningly illustrated visual guide to the heavens deserves a place on every amateur astronomer's bookshelf. It features both sky maps and dramatic photos of all major constellations, from Andromeda to Virgo. It also provides a stargazer's excursion across the solar system, focusing on planets, asteroids, meteors, and comets. Exploring further into deep space, it presents breathtaking photos—many of them taken from NASA's famous Hubble telescope—of colliding galaxies, supernovas, and spirograph nebulae. The author advises beginners on nighttime sky-watching, whether they make their observations with the naked eye, with binoculars, or with a telescope. He also discusses unmanned space exploration, provides star maps for each month of the year, and explains such phenomena as the Big Bang and black holes. The Stargazer's Guide to the Universe is printed throughout in full color and features more than 250 photos and illustrations.

Yozshubei
Amazing dialog. Learned lots. Am still reading this book.
Onaxan
The rather pompous title disguises a good beginner's guide to astronomy. The first two chapters provide a brief overview of our current understanding of astronomy, followed by a discussion of the instruments we now use to do astronomy, from Hubble to radio telescopes to space probes. After that comes the meat of the book, three chapters dividing the universe into our galaxy, outside our galaxy, and the solar system. Each chapter provides an overview followed by a host of examples. The examples are my favorite part of the book: each is a two-page spread, with a big beautiful photo on one side and an explanation on the other. The explanation consists not only of a brief text but a sky map showing the exact location of the object in the photo as well as a smaller, annotated version of the photo pointing out notable elements that appear in the image, whether it be craters or interstellar clouds of a particular composition or a ten-billion-year-old supernova. (I could have used some of that in my astronomy classes.)

The text is not terribly sophisticated, and I found myself skimming through it to get to the photo section. I also have one quibble and two errors. The quibble is that there's no mention of false-color imagery, even though I think a number of the photos are in false color - oxygen clouds are not automatically green. The errors are in the chapter on instruments. In one place it says the radio telescope at Arecibo is built into the top of a mountain. It's not, of course, it's built into the bottom of a (radio-dish-shaped) valley. It also states that the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, with its four 8.2 meter telescopes, has the light-gathering power of a mirror 200 meters across. Even with some additional smaller telescopes, that's unlikely: it would take another 590 8.2m telescopes to make that true. I assume he means the resolving power.

However, those are minor points in a beautiful and informative book. I got this at the library but would seriously consider getting my own copy, for both the beautiful photographs and the helpful explanations thereof.
Zadora
Although most serious astronomers don't look at images through their telescopes (they have instruments like spectroscopes analyzing the light that's coming in) the images that have been produced in the last few years have been truly outstanding. For the first time mankind has sent spacecraft to objects in our solar system. We have rocks back from the moon, we have close up images of planets and moons, we have Spirit and Opportunity roving around on Mars. And we have the Hubble Space Telescope sending back astounding photographs.

The result is this book, filled with images and information that just a short time ago simply wasn't available. The images that are reproduced here are simply spactactular. The book starts with the biggest objects: galaxies and star clusters. Then it moves down to our own Milky Way Galaxy, and then to our own solar system.

This is a coffee table picture book, but with some truly out of this world images.
Virn
Incredible photos of the universe from Hubble and other large telescopes. Makes you consider how insignificant we are in the scheme of things on the one hand and the size of our magnificent universe which we inhabit on the other. This book contains some of the most incredible astronomical photographs ever published anywhere in my opinion.