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Download Classic Telescopes: A Guide to Collecting, Restoring, and Using Telescopes of Yesteryear (The Patrick Moore Practical Astronomy Series) fb2

by Neil English
Download Classic Telescopes: A Guide to Collecting, Restoring, and Using Telescopes of Yesteryear (The Patrick Moore Practical Astronomy Series) fb2
Astronomy & Space Science
  • Author:
    Neil English
  • ISBN:
    1461444233
  • ISBN13:
    978-1461444237
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Springer; 2013 edition (August 30, 2012)
  • Pages:
    239 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Astronomy & Space Science
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1690 kb
  • ePUB format
    1840 kb
  • DJVU format
    1271 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    701
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi docx doc


Part of Patrick Moore’s Practical Astronomy Serie. lassic Telescopes approaches the topic from a skilled collectors and . This book is not a "Guide to collecting" nor is it a source of information on "restoring" old telescopes.

Part of Patrick Moore’s Practical Astronomy Serie. lassic Telescopes approaches the topic from a skilled collectors and telescope operators perspective. The focus is primarily on refractors of yesteryear, with a scattering of reflectors from the past century thrown i. Classic Telescopes is an indispensable reference resource for anyone refurbishing or hunting for a piece of astronomical history. That would be a nice book to write, but this book is not that. David Dickinson, Astro Guyz, November, 2012).

Classic Telescopes book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Classic Telescopes: A Guide to Collecting, Restoring, and Using Telescopes of Yesteryear (The Patrick Moore Practical Astronomy Series) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Classic telescopes are of interest to amateur astronomers for a variety of reasons. There are the dedicated collectors, but there are also many amateurs who love the nostalgia they inspire. These telescopes "feel" different from any contemporary telescope and perhaps have a unique ability to reconnect the owner to a bygone age of craftmanship. This book takes a look at traditional telescopes built by the great instrument makers of the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly the dynastic telescope makers, including Dollond, Alvan Clark, Thomas Cooke & Sons, and Carl Zeiss.

249 Pages · 2013 · 1. 2 MB · 159 Downloads ·English. Classic telescopes are of interest to amateur astronomers for a variety of reasons. by Neil English (auth. We may have all come on different ships, but we're in the same boat now. ― . A consumer's guide to the economics of electric utility ratemaking. 78 MB·5,476 Downloads·New! rates. Some of the examples used in the Guide are from particular states, such as Illinois. Knowledge and Diplomacy. 56 MB·23,161 Downloads·New!

Classic telescopes are of interest to amateur astronomers for a variety of reasons.

This book describes the telescopes built by such renowned makers as Dollond, Alvan Clark, Thomas Cooke & Sons, Carl Zeiss and others. Includes interviews with collectors of classic telescopes, and tips for readers on prospecting for and acquiring their own. These telescopes "feel" different from any contemporary telesc. Patrick Moore Practical Astronomy.

I restored Sir Patrick Moore's telesocpes and helped write the 'resurecting the Masters glass' chapter. Didn't realise the book had made it to print. Unfortunately it's just too expensive for me to grab a copy though. These telescopes "feel" different from any contemporary telescope and perhaps have a unique ability to reconnect the owner to a bygone age of craftmanship

Book Description: Classic Telescopes’ is a good introduction to historic telescope makers and their lives and creations mostly focusing on those telescope makers that also made smaller instruments that might end up in the hands of an amateur astronomer

Book Description: Classic Telescopes’ is a good introduction to historic telescope makers and their lives and creations mostly focusing on those telescope makers that also made smaller instruments that might end up in the hands of an amateur astronomer. In general it was fascinating and a fast read. this book makes for a good eye-opener as it introduces opticians and their work in a less academic way that would be appealing for a larger general audience.

Neil English, Classic telescopes are of interest to amateur astronomers for a variety of reasons. Also included are lesser luminaries such as John Brashear, John Calver, William Wray, Henry Fitz, and William Henry Mogey.

Classic telescopes are of interest to amateur astronomers for a variety of reasons. There are the dedicated collectors, but there are also many amateurs who love the nostalgia they inspire. These telescopes "feel" different from any contemporary telescope and perhaps have a unique ability to reconnect the owner to a bygone age of craftmanship. This book takes a look at traditional telescopes built by the great instrument makers of the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly the dynastic telescope makers, including Dollond, Alvan Clark, Thomas Cooke & Sons, and Carl Zeiss. Also included are lesser luminaries such as John Brashear, John Calver, William Wray, Henry Fitz, and William Henry Mogey.

'Classic Telescopes' covers the key features of the telescopes designed by these manufacturers, and shows how a heady combination of market trends, instrument condition, and pedigree will dictate their prices at auction. 'Classic Telescopes' also shows the reader how to find real bargains! Interviews with top classic telescope collectors (and users) provide the best tips of prospecting for a genuine acquisition.


Levaq
Let's get the subtitle out of the way first. This book is not a "Guide to collecting" nor is it a source of information on "restoring" old telescopes. It simply isn't. That would be a nice book to write, but this book is not that.

What this book is, is a delightful trip through the history of telescopes from the late 1700's to the present. You may have read about Dolland and Brashear and Clark before, but this book has a twist. When there's a section on Dolland, the author Neil English calls up one of his buddies who HAS a Dolland refractor and asks him how it compares to a new Stellarvue! He does this for most of the makers he profiles. His photos are of these telescopes as they are today, sometimes on their original mountings and sometimes not.

Overall, these very long focal length refractors compare quite favorably to modern refractors of similar aperture for certain tasks. They're especially good at things like splitting double stars. These comparisons continue into the 20th century with lengthy sections on Tasco, Unitron and Zeiss.

He covers telescope manufacturers right up to modern times, with sections (albeit small) on the Meade ETX, Celestron C8 and Questar. The last, all too brief, chapter tells how professionals restored Patrick Moore's telescopes, which had fallen into shocking disrepair.

After reading this you'll have a new appreciation for some of those old 70mm refractors on eBay.

Oh, one warning, the smallish black & white photos are very muddy looking (poor quality paper?) which is a crying shame, but there are quite a few excellent color photos too.
Urllet
A fascinating read for anyone who loves not only famous historical instruments, but also more modern "classic" refracting telescopes. As a Unitron owner, I especially enjoyed the Chapter on Unitron's history.

In fact, what I like most about this book is that it didn't have to be a Cooke, Clark, or Mogey to be considered a classic telescope. Many chapters covered more recent telescopes that have also become quality classics, and highly sought after refractors, like Zeiss, Unitron, Swift, Tasco, Discoverer (Towa), etc.

A joyful trip down memory lane with a gentle sprinkling of hard data and visual comparisons to move the storyline along. A great companion edition to Choosing and Using a Refracting Telescope, also by Neil English.
Dynen
This is a terrific introduction to the variety of telescopic equipment that has been available over the last couple centuries, many of which may still be found gracing a star party near you. I was pleased to see mention of a couple models I happen to have included as a part of my own amateur astronomy rig, a Celestron 8 "Orange Tube" and a Cave Astrola. The evolution of amateur astronomy is chronicled well in this survey of artifacts of the hobby.
DarK-LiGht
I am a professional astronomer. This book is an excellent reference for anyone truly interested in telescopes. Neil English not only writes an engaging history of the telescope, but also provides enough optics theory to explain how and why these instruments behave under varying conditions.
Every astronomer and serious amateur should have a copy!
Honeirsil
An absolutely informative and fascinating book that is a must ready for anyone who loves
refractors and old classic refractors. Neil English is superb as a writer and you can pick up
on his love for the topic. A must read!
Granigrinn
Well written, Neal is very knowledgeable, however I was looking for more information concerning the actual restoration processes.
Wel
great book on old refractors.