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by Patricia Daniels,Robert Burnham
Download The New Solar System: Ice Worlds, Moons, and Planets Redefined fb2
Astronomy & Space Science
  • Author:
    Patricia Daniels,Robert Burnham
  • ISBN:
    1426207530
  • ISBN13:
    978-1426207532
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    National Geographic (2010)
  • Subcategory:
    Astronomy & Space Science
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1439 kb
  • ePUB format
    1289 kb
  • DJVU format
    1714 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    980
  • Formats:
    lrf lit mobi docx


Top Ten New Solar System Stories From the new National Geographic book, The New Solar System . ello, dwarf planets Haumea, Makemake, Eris, and other newly christened dwarf planets expand the solar system family.

Top Ten New Solar System Stories From the new National Geographic book, The New Solar System: Ice Worlds, Moons, and Planets Redefined. ood-bye, Pluto Pluto’s demotion to dwarf planet leaves the solar system with eight major worlds. ater on Mars The case for life on Mars gets a boost when a flotilla of spacecraft finds not only ice, but evidence of ancient rivers and floods on the red planet. arget: Earth A large asteroid or comet will strike the Earth: The question.

The New Solar System book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Patricia Daniels has written extensively on history and science, including National Geographic Pocket Guide to the Constellations and National Geographic Encyclopedia of Space. Robert Burnham is a science writer at the Mars Space Flight Facility of Arizona State University

Patricia Daniels has written extensively on history and science, including National Geographic Pocket Guide to the Constellations and National Geographic Encyclopedia of Space. Robert Burnham is a science writer at the Mars Space Flight Facility of Arizona State University. He is the author of Great Comets and the Reader’s Digest Children’s Atlas of the Universe. Библиографические данные. The New Solar System: Ice Worlds, Moons, and Planets Redefined.

Torrent details for "The New Solar System: Ice Worlds, Moons .

As we celebrate NASA’s first half-century and look outward to exciting new possibilities, public interest in all things interplanetary will only grow more intense-and this wonderfully timely book is poised to launch us once more into the High Frontier.

Daniels, Patricia, 1955-. Publication, Distribution, et. Washington, . National Geographic Society, (c)2009

Daniels, Patricia, 1955-. National Geographic Society, (c)2009. From breathtaking photographs to detailed explanatory diagrams to expert essays, fascinating sidebars, and informative fact boxes, this is not just an easy-to-use reference, but also a visually stunning volume to fire the imagination of even the most casual reader. From publisher description.

Additional Product Features. Robert Burnham, Patricia Daniels. Patricia Daniels has written extensively on history and science, including National Geographic Pocket Guide to the Constellations and National Geographic Encyclopedia of Space

Additional Product Features. Patricia Daniels has written extensively on history and science, including National Geographic Pocket Guide to the Constellations and National Geographic Encyclopedia of Space. He is the author of Great Comets and the Reader s Digest Children s Atlas of the Universe. Country of Publication. The World, Ideas, Culture": General Interest.

After reading "New Solar System" my old interest in astronomy has become a fascination.

For anyone wanting to learn about the solar system without being blinded by science, this book is the ideal way to find out what's gone on, going on, and will be going on "out there". The author does a wonderful job in relaying facts and predictions in a manner that's easy to follow. After reading "New Solar System" my old interest in astronomy has become a fascination. It's incredible what advances have been made in the last decade or so, and more have been made since this text was published in 2009. Truth really is stranger than fiction. Can't really praise this one high enough.

Foreword by Robert Burnham. ISBN 9781426207532 Price Reflects 20% off! Selling worldwide since 1987. We always pack with great care!.

In The New Solar System, science writer Patricia Daniels states with good humor that while The New Solar . Hypotheses come and go. Definitions shift.

In The New Solar System, science writer Patricia Daniels states with good humor that while The New Solar System,Books. In conclusion, there is no conclusion. Space probes and giant telescopes keep pushing the human eye further from home, uncovering a universe richer in wonder than anyone but a science-fiction writer could have imagined even 50 years ago. Tags. David Luhrssen lectured at UWM and the MIAD.

Aimed at the popular audience by experienced astronomy author Patricia Daniels with contributions by former editor of Astronomy magazine Robert Burnham and highlighted by 160 photographs, diagrams and maps, this superb guide explores every corner of Earth's planetary neighborhood, from the fiery sun at its center to the dark, icy realm where interstellar space begins. It's a state-of-the-art observation of the solar system as we know it today and a knowledgeable forecast of what to expect in the future, from Pluto's demotion to plutoid to the upcoming Moon mission, the likelihood of a manned expedition to Mars, and much more.From breathtaking full-color photographs to detailed explanatory diagrams to expert essays, fascinating sidebars, and informative fact boxes, the New Solar System is not just an easy-to-use, solidly reliable reference, but also a visually stunning, invitingly browsable volume guaranteed to fire the imagination of even the most casual reader.As we celebrate NASA's first half-century and look outward to exciting new possibilities, public interest in all things interplanetary will only grow more intense-and this wonderfully timely book is poised to launch us once more into the High Frontier.

blac wolf
many science books these days that seem to have been proofread by people who are unfamiliar with the subject, or lack proofreading.... this book contains some glaring errors such as the temperature at the center of Jupiter may be 35,540 degrees Fahrenheit .... OK, this is a theoretical temperature , but then it goes on to state "hotter than the center of the sun".... however the center of the sun is about 27,000,000°F..... in "the new solar system " there are no images showing the orbits of the planets around the sun in their proper scale ! there are no images showing the relative size of planets ! or their moons .... nothing to convey that these are members of a solar SYSTEM.... this is produced by National Geographic, I thought it would be reliable ..... there are many big beautiful images, but all the planets and even the sun appear to be pretty much the same size ..ll if a child picked up this book and looked at it they would have no impression at all of what the solar system is really like ... the text itself is printed in a rather small thin light grey font on glossy paper making it difficult to read.... a MUCH better book is "the grand tour , a travelers guide to the solar system by Ron Miller and William K Hartman " .
Zut
While Patricia Daniels' summary of recent solar system data is neither perfect nor incredibly detailed, which may irk some physicists and astronomers, for the educated layman, it is still one of the best overviews among the current crop of similar publications. There is a considerable amount of information to consider and she does so in a well-organized, easy-to-understand fashion that includes good artwork and some excellent photographs. The author runs through the creation of the solar system, has a pretty good section on the sun, then deals with the inner terrestrial planets, including the Moon, discusses the asteroid belt, then moves to the gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn), their largest moons, the "ice giants" (Uranus and Neptune) and their major moons, and finally covers the so-called "plutoids" before rounding out the discussion with interesting sections on the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud before concluding with exoplanets and similar considerations. A table at the end of the book summarizes the salient info, which may prove handy for quick reference. While detailed information is somewhat lacking, making one yearn for a more in-depth analysis of several of the subjects that are raised, one can certainly use this book to easily reference the fundamental information currently available.
That said, there are some "mistakes" in the book (for instance, the author often refers to "Kelvins" rather than degrees Kelvin) and there is a reference to the hypothesis of anthropogenic climate change which I find inappropriate in the context of such a large-scale, physical discussion of the solar system. I also don't appreciate references to producers of relatively recent sci-fi movies or her touting the memory of Carl Sagan while neglecting such classic works as Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles or some of the books by Isaac Asimov. Such minor matters aside, however, this offering from National Geographic holds up well, especially when compared to even more recent summaries of solar system and space info that are fat, glitzy, expensive, and really not significantly better. Of course, it shouldn't be the only book you have on the subject, but there is little doubt you will find this one useful to reference again and again.
After his retirement from the Aerospace industry, my father (a nuclear and space physicist) worked doggedly for twenty years on a detailed compendium of similar subject matter. Unfortunately, he was never completely satisfied with the job he was doing and he died before he could finish the task. Keeping that in mind, while Daniels' book won't compare to an in-depth analysis written by an accomplished scientist in the field, it is nevertheless a pretty good effort and the author should be commended for it.
Jothris
great
Hasirri
This is an excellent book for anybody that is interested in the solar system. The book is easy to understand and it has great photos and illustrations.
Ucantia
If you were expecting National Geographic-style glossy pics, forget it. The graphics are supposed to be innovative but they are just annoying. Daniels writes well but there were nonsensical statements, scientific inanities, on every page - pity the editorial process missed them; if you know any physics, you'll find it infuriating.
Anarasida
Having been raised on Time-Life Books' _The Planets_, it was a pleasant surprise to find a worthy successor to the astronomy text I loved as a child.

And there is much to like in National Geographic's _The New Solar System_:

* For the masses of nonscientists, yet retaining facts and educational merit
* Great attention to photos, illustrations, and graphic layout, counterbalanced by text that is easy to read and process
* Up to date, featuring the latest info on space exploration and new discoveries within our solar system and just beyond
* A methodical outline of the journey from sun to Oort Cloud that never lags for interest
* A long chapter devoted to plutoids and Kuiper Belt objects
* An excellent overview of changing theories within astronomy and why the field is still in flux
* A fine cultivation of the sense of mystery and awe that confront modern astronomers and cosmologists
* Countless interesting facts about how astronomers make new discoveries
* Short biographic sidebars on astronomers whose names may not be household but who made significant contributions to the field

The only flaw, and it's a small one, is that the author occasionally "breaks the plane" through clichéd or overly familiar wordings.

_The New Solar System_ is the kind of popular science book that any family would be blessed to own. At this price, it's a tremendous value and will bring joy for years to come.